2016-17 Catalog

Cognitive Science

Program Director: Barbara Malt, Ph.D. (Stanford)

Email: bcm0@lehigh.edu    ♦  Phone: 610-758-4797

Website:  http://cogsci.cas2.lehigh.edu/

Supported by the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs 610-758-3996; incasip@lehigh.edu
Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive


Core Faculty

Kate Arrington, Ph.D. (Psychology); Mark Bickhard, Ph.D. (Philosophy and Psychology); Amanda Brandone, Ph.D. (Psychology); Nancy Carlisle, Ph.D. (Psychology); John Gatewood, Ph.D. (Sociology and Anthropology); Jeffrey Heflin, Ph.D. (Computer Science and Engineering); Almut Hupbach, Ph.D. (Psychology); Kiri Lee, Ph.D. (Modern Languages and Literatures); Barbara Malt, Ph.D. (Psychology); Jessecae Marsh, Ph.D. (Psychology); Hector Munoz-Avila, Ph.D. (Computer Science and Engineering); Padraig O’Seaghdha, Ph.D. (Psychology); Dominic Packer, Ph.D. (Psychology); and Aladdin Yaqub, Ph.D. (Philosophy)


The mission of the Cognitive Science Program is to advance the study of minds and brains, real or artificial, in all their aspects, through research and teaching. This interdisciplinary field, encompassing the fields of psychology, linguistics, computer science, philosophy, anthropology, and neuroscience, provides excellent preparation for life in the age of information.  The program aims to instill in students a solid grasp of the intellectual problems, frameworks, and methodologies currently available; to provide experience exploring these through guided research; and to foster the desire to create and disseminate new knowledge. With this foundation, students are well prepared for a wide variety of careers in technology, human thought and behavior, or their interaction, or for graduate studies in Cognitive Science or any of the contributing disciplines.

We offer an undergraduate major in Cognitive Science, an undergraduate minor, a graduate minor, and a graduate certificate. A Cognitive Science major is easy to combine with a second major in the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, or computer science.

B.A. in Cognitive Science

The B.A. with a major in Cognitive Science requires a minimum of 13 courses. All majors take COGS 007, an introduction to cognitive science, core courses in cognitive psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, and cognitive neuroscience, and collaterals in computer science and math.  In a second tier, students pursue their individual interests in their selections of major electives by completing at least five electives from three tracks. A capstone integration occurs in the required two-semester senior thesis (COGS 301 and COGS 399), in which students focus on a topic of their choice spanning at least two cognitive science sub-disciplines.

Additional coursework in affiliated disciplines is recommended, to be selected in consultation with the major adviser and dependent upon anticipated career path.  These courses may fulfill college distribution requirements.  Note: A number of courses have pre-requisites.   Students considering this major should check pre-requisites and plan accordingly. A preliminary meeting with the program director may be useful.

Collateral Requirements
CSE 001Breadth of Computing2
CSE 002Fundamentals of Programming2
MATH 021Calculus I4
or MATH 051 Survey of Calculus I
Introductory Course
COGS 007Introduction to Cognitive Science4
Disciplinary Core Courses
COGS/PSYC 117Cognitive Psychology4
COGS/PSYC 176Cognitive Neuroscience4
COGS/PHIL 250Philosophy of Mind4
COGS/CSE 327Artificial Intelligence Theory and Practice3
Major Electives
Select a minimum of five electives, with at least one course from each of the three tracks.16-20
Senior Thesis
COGS 301Senior Project in Cognitive Science: Proposal3
COGS 399Senior Project in Cognitive Science: Thesis3
Total Credits49-53

MAJOR ELECTIVES

Artifical Intelligence and Formal Models
Programming and Data Structures
Game Design
Discrete Structures
Programming Languages
Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Pattern Recognition
Topics on Intelligent Decision Support Systems
Reinforcement Learning
AI Game Programming
Introduction to Mobile Robotics
Intelligent Agents
Symbolic Logic
Topics in Philosophical Logic
Philosophy of Mathematics
Mathematical Logic
Axiomatic Set Theory
Computability Theory
Language, Culture, and Meaning
Culture and the Individual
Introduction to Linguistics
Contemporary Philosophy
Ways of Knowing
Making Sense of Words
Higher Order Cognition
Person Perception
Social Cognition
Psychology of Language
Language Development
Health Care Reasoning and Decision Making
Children's Thinking
Cognition in Practice & Policy
Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Self and Identity
Human Communication
Cognition and Neuroscience
Biology Core III: Integrative & Comparative Biology
Central Nervous System and Behavior
Experimental Neuroscience Laboratory
Neurobiology of Sensory Systems
Diseases of the Nervous System
Endocrinology of Behavior
Synapses, Plasticity and Learning
Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory
Inside the Infant Mind
Memory Under Construction
Attention and Attentional Failures

Minor in Cognitive Science

The undergraduate minor in Cognitive Science requires five courses:

COGS 007Introduction to Cognitive Science4
Four additional courses selected from among the major's core courses and major electives, with at least two of these being Disciplinary Core Courses12-16
Total Credits16-20

Program Honors

Majors seeking to graduate with honors in cognitive science must have a 3.30 GPA in the major, a 3.30 GPA overall, and complete a high quality senior thesis. Theses submitted for honors will be evaluated by a committee of at least three cognitive science faculty. 

For Graduate Students

There are two concentrations in Cognitive Science available for post-baccalaureate students: a Graduate Minor and a Graduate Certificate. The minor is intended for students currently enrolled in a degree-granting graduate program at Lehigh University.  The certificate is intended for non-degree students.

Graduate Minor in Cognitive Science

The minor gives graduate students who are enrolled in Lehigh University degree programs, such as computer science or psychology, an opportunity to develop expertise at the intersection of information processing by humans and intelligent machines. Graduate students investigating mental processes or applications such as artificial intelligence or educational technology are encouraged to participate, with the approval of an adviser in their major program, by contacting the Director of the Cognitive Science Program. On completion of the program, the Director of the Cognitive Science Program will issue a letter to the student certifying that he or she has met the requirements of the minor.

The Graduate Minor requires five graduate level courses: the core course COGS/PSYC 423 and four electives.  At least two of the four electives must be taken outside the student's home department.  Special topics courses with a cognitive science emphasis may also count towards the minor, with the approval of the Cognitive Science Program Director.  Courses taken towards the minor may also fulfill requirements of the student's major program, with the approval of the major department. 

The Graduate Minor requires five graduate level courses.

COGS/PSYC 423Foundations of Cognitive Science3
Four electives from the list below (or approved substitutions).12-16
Computer Science
AI Game Programming
Pattern Recognition
Semantic Web Topics
Intelligent Agents
Topics on Intelligent Decision Support Systems
Data Mining
Mobile Robotics
Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Social Cognition
Seminar In Language Acquisition
Seminar in Psychology of Language
Naive Realism in Social Judgement
Seminar In Cognition
Ontological Psychology
Seminar in Cognitive Development
Philosophy 1
Philosophy of Mind
Making Sense of Words
Sociology and Anthropology
Culture and the Individual
Total Credits15-19
1

Note: These particular 200-level courses may be taken by graduate students.

Graduate Certificate in Cognitive Science

This concentration is intended for people working in technology-related businesses and other qualified individuals with an interest in cognitive science. It provides non-degree post-baccalaureate students with an interdisciplinary perspective on human and machine intelligence.

The Graduate Certificate requires four graduate level courses: the core course COGS/PSYC 423 and three electives.  At least two of the tree electives must be at the 400-level, and the three electives must be spread over at least two departments. 

COGS 423Foundations of Cognitive Science3
Three electives from the list below.9-12
Computer Science
Artificial Intelligence Theory and Practice
User Interface Systems and Techniques
Multimedia Design and Development
Topics on Intelligent Decision Support Systems
AI Game Programming
Pattern Recognition
Semantic Web Topics
Intelligent Agents
Topics on Intelligent Decision Support Systems
Reinforcement Learning and Markov Decision Precesses
Data Mining
Mobile Robotics
Psychology
Higher Order Cognition
Person Perception
Social Cognition
Psychology of Emotion
Psychology of Language
Language Development
Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory
Children's Thinking
Inside the Infant Mind
Cognition in Practice & Policy
Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Memory Under Construction
Attention and Attentional Failures
Developmental Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Social Cognition
Seminar In Language Acquisition
Seminar in Psychology of Language
Naive Realism in Social Judgement
Seminar In Cognition
Ontological Psychology
Seminar in Cognitive Development
Philosophy 1
Philosophy of Mind
Making Sense of Words
Sociology and Anthropology
Culture and the Individual
Total Credits12-15
1

Note: These particular 200-level courses may be taken by graduate students.

Courses

COGS 007 Introduction to Cognitive Science 4 Credits

What is a mind? How is the mind related to the brain? Could we make an artificial mind? Issues concerning knowledge representation and intelligence in minds and computers as investigated by psychologists, philosophers, linguists, neuroscientists, and researchers in artificial intelligence.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

COGS 117 (PSYC 117) Cognitive Psychology 4 Credits

The architecture and dynamics of the human mind: How we acquire knowledge through perception, represent and activate it in memory, and use it to communicate, make decisions, solve problems, and reason creatively. May not be taken pass/fail.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

COGS 140 (ANTH 140, MLL 140) Introduction to Linguistics 4 Credits

Relationship between language and mind; formal properties of language; language and society; how languages change over time. May not be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

COGS 161 Supervised Research 2-4 Credits

Research under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the cognitive science program. Students must arrange the particular project with a faculty member before enrolling. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

COGS 176 (PSYC 176) Cognitive Neuroscience 4 Credits

Perception and cognitive neuroscience as the link between mental processes and their biological bases. Visual and auditory perception; the control of action; neuropsychological syndromes of perception, language, memory, and thought; neural network (connectionist) models of mental processes. May not be taken pass/fail.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: NS

COGS 250 (PHIL 250) Philosophy of Mind 4 Credits

An exploration of the mind-body problem. Are the body and mind distinct substances (dualism); or is there only body (materialism); or only mind (idealism)? Other views to be considered include behaviorism (the view that behavior can be explained without recourse to mental states), and the view that the mind is a complex computer. Must have completed one HU-designated course in Philosophy at 100-level or higher.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

COGS 301 Senior Project in Cognitive Science: Proposal 1-3 Credits

Senior year integration of the material from cognitive science begins with the proposal of a substantial review or research project spanning at least two cognitive science disciplines under the direction of a Cognitive Science faculty member. Students must enroll for a total of three credits which may be split between the sections of a primary and secondary adviser. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

COGS 327 (CSE 327) Artificial Intelligence Theory and Practice 3 Credits

Introduction to the field of artificial intelligence: Problem solving, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning and machine learning. Use of AI systems or languages. Advanced topics such as natural language processing, vision, robotics, and uncertainty. CSE 261 is recommended.
Prerequisites: (CSE 001 and CSE 002) or CSE 017

COGS 361 Independent Research 2-4 Credits

Independent research in cognitive science with a faculty advisor. Students must arrange the particular project with a faculty advisor before enrolling. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

COGS 399 Senior Project in Cognitive Science: Thesis 1-3 Credits

Research during senior year culminating in senior thesis advised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty. Execution and written report of project proposed and approved in COGS 301. Students must enroll for a total of three credits which may be split between the sections of a primary and secondary adviser. Theses submitted for honors will be evaluated by a committee of at least three cognitive science faculty. Prerequisite: COGS 301 and consent of the program director.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: COGS 301

COGS 405 Individual Study in Cognitive Science 1-6 Credits

Study of a topic not covered in regular course offerings. By arrangement with a consulting faculty member. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

COGS 423 (PSYC 423) Foundations of Cognitive Science 3 Credits

Survey of fundamental theory and methodologies from artificial intelligence, linguistics, cognitive psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience, as well as salient research problems such as knowledge acquisition and representation, natural language processing, skill acquisition, perception and action, and the philosophical question of intentionality.

COGS 478 (PSYC 478) Ontological Psychology 3 Credits

Principles and constraints for modeling psychological phenomena. Representation; perception; memory; knowing; learning; emotions; consciousness; language; rationality.

Associate Professor. Padraig G O'Seaghdha, PhD (University of Toronto)