2013-14 Catalog

Psychology

The Psychology Department offers B.A. and B.S. undergraduate degrees, undergraduate minors in general psychology and clinical psychology, and M.Sc. and Ph.D. graduate degrees.

Psychology is the science of mind, brain, and behavior. Undergraduate study in Psychology provides:

  • A knowledge base about how people think, feel, and act as individuals and in groups, from infancy to old age
  • An understanding of how psychological principles can be applied in everyday life to improve the human condition
  • Working knowledge of empirical research methods for psychology and ethical issues in research and application
  • An appreciation of individual, sociocultural, and international diversity
  • Familiarity with the relationship of psychological processes to brain processes
  • Critical thinking, communication, and teamwork skills

Psychology majors pursue careers in many areas such as: business including marketing and industrial/organizational psychology; education; medicine/health; mental and behavioral health professions including clinical, counseling, and sports psychology; law; human services; and basic and applied research positions. The knowledge and skills provided by a degree in Psychology are valuable to all such careers.

For more information, please visit our website:  http://psychology.cas2.lehigh.edu/

B.A. Major Program in Psychology

The Bachelor of Arts in psychology is a social science major requiring 11 courses (approximately 44 credit hours) in psychology as described below. The B.A. requires three core courses, four 100-level breadth courses, and four 300-level seminars. Students must also fulfill college and university degree requirements. This flexible program permits development of one or more minors in other fields or the undertaking of a double major. Transfer credits and study abroad course work may be applied toward the major; however, students must take a minimum of two 100-level breadth courses, three 300-level seminars, and PSYC 210 at Lehigh to complete a psychology major from Lehigh.


Required Core Courses12
Introduction to Psychology
Statistical Analysis of Behavioral Data
Experimental Research Methods and Laboratory
Breadth Courses16
Four 100-level courses, with a minimum of one from each of the following three areas, are required of all majors. 1
Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience
Cognitive Psychology
Mind and Brain
Developmental
Child Development
Adulthood and Aging
Social and Personality
Social Psychology
Personality
Seminars16
Four 300-level seminars are required of all B.A. students. Seminars need to span at least two areas. (See list of seminars per area in Psychology Concentrations section below). 2
Total Credits44

1

The fourth 100-level breadth course must be selected from any of the above courses or PSYC 138.

2

Students can not use PSYC 300, PSYC 310, PSYC 391, PSYC 392, PSYC 393 or PSYC 394 to fulfill this requirement. All other 300-level psychology courses can be used to fulfill this requirement.

Optional Concentration

Students in the B.A. program may choose to complete an optional concentration. Concentrations are available in four areas: Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience; Developmental; Social and Personality; and Clinical and Behavioral Health. Completion of a concentration involves selecting specific 100-level breadth courses and 300-level seminars within the concentration. See listings of individual concentration courses below.

Recommended Electives

The B.A. program in psychology is a flexible preparation for a number of fields. With suitable selection of additional courses, students can prepare themselves for graduate study in any subfield of psychology or for careers in areas for which psychology is a desirable and relevant major such as neuroscience, law, social work, marketing, management, and education.

Depending on the specific subfield of interest, many courses in other departments within CAS, and in other Colleges, may be relevant. Examples include Biological Sciences (especially the Behavioral Neuroscience program), Philosophy, Sociology and Anthropology, Marketing, Economics, Management, Education, and in the interdisciplinary programs of Cognitive Science; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Health, Medicine, and Society; Global Studies; and Africana Studies.

For graduate programs in psychology, neuroscience, and related fields, additional coursework in research and statistics is desirable, as is engagement in supervised research and participation in the honors program.

Preparation for programs in health-related areas such as nursing, medicine, and dentistry will include additional coursework in biology, chemistry, and physics. Students should consult with the appropriate pre-professional advisors to determine specific requirements.

Students interested in applying psychology to fields such as law, marketing, social work, management, or education should consult with faculty in those areas to discuss relevant courses.

B.S. Major Program in Psychology

The Bachelor of Science in psychology is a highly structured and comprehensive behavioral science major requiring 12 courses (approximately 48 credit hours) in psychology and 10 collateral courses (approximately 35-40 credit hours) as described below. Students must also fulfill college and university degree requirements. Students pursuing a wide-range of post-graduate plans may find this program fits their needs and interests. One difference between the B.S. in psychology and other B.S. programs is that the collateral requirements for the B.S. in psychology allow for a level of breadth that is not always possible in B.S. programs. The collateral courses for the B.S. in psychology span three areas (Mathematics and Computer Science; Natural Science; and Social and Cognitive Science). Hence, students with wide-ranging interests may find that they can pursue their varied interests while fulfilling the collateral requirements for this B.S. program. For students considering graduate programs in psychology, neuroscience, and related fields, additional coursework in research and statistics is desirable, as is engagement in supervised research and participation in the honors program.

Students in the B.S. program must complete a concentration in Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience; Developmental; Social and Personality; or Clinical and Behavioral Health. Progression through the program is best served through early commitment. Students who do not declare their majors early may find it difficult to complete the B.S. major program. Transfer credits and study abroad course work may be applied toward the major; however, students must take a minimum of two 100-level breadth courses, three 300-level seminars, and PSYC 210 at Lehigh to earn a psychology major from Lehigh.

Requirements for the B.S. in Psychology

Collateral Requirements

For students in the B.S. program, collateral courses can be used to fulfill the college distribution requirements in mathematics, natural science, and social science. To fulfill natural science college distribution requirements, at least one course must include the associated lab.

Please consult the course listings for information on prerequisites.

Mathematics and Computer Science7-8
Select two of the following:
Basic Statistics
Survey of Linear Algebra
Any of the calculus courses or above
Breadth of Computing
   and Fundamentals of Programming
Any CSE course 12 or above
Natural Science14-16
Select at least one of the following:
Drugs and Behavior
Bioscience in the 21st Century
Biology Core I: Cellular and Molecular
The Environment and Living Systems
Conservation and Biodiversity
Introduction to Environmental and Organismal Biology
Select three of the following:
Any BIOS course 010 or above
Any CHM course 030 or above
Any PHY course 010 or above
EES courses 25, 28, or 31
Social and Cognitive Science7-8
Select two of the following:
Any Anthropology (ANTH), Sociology and Anthropology (SOAN), Sociology/Social Psychology (SSP). 1
Any area studies (Asian, Africana, etc.); Global Studies (GS); Health, Medicine, and Society (HMS); Science, Technology, and Society (STS); and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS). 1,2
Additional Coursework7-8
Select any two additional courses from the above lists. 3
Total Credits35-40

1

 Courses may not be cross-listed with Psychology.

2

 Courses must have a SS designation.

3

 Students are strongly encouraged to discuss their interests and career goals with their advisor before selecting courses.

Psychology Requirements

Required Core Courses12
Introduction to Psychology
Statistical Analysis of Behavioral Data
Experimental Research Methods and Laboratory
Breadth Courses16
Four 100-level courses, with a minimum of one from each of the following three areas, are required of all majors. 1
Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience
Cognitive Psychology
Mind and Brain
Developmental
Child Development
Adulthood and Aging
Social and Personality
Social Psychology
Personality
Seminars20
Five 300-level seminars are required of all B.S. students. Seminars need to span at least two areas. (See list of seminars per area in Psychology Concentrations section below.) 2
Total Credits48

1

 The fourth 100-level breadth course is determined by the concentration being pursued.

2

 Students can not use PSYC 300, PSYC 310, PSYC 391, PSYC 392, PSYC 393, PSYC 394 or to fulfill this requirement. All other 300-level psychology courses can be used to fulfill this requirement.


Psychology Concentrations

Concentrations are available in four areas: Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience; Developmental; Social and Personality; and Clinical and Behavioral Health. Students in the B.A. major program may choose to complete a concentration. Students in the B.S. major program are required to complete a concentration. Completion of a concentration involves selecting two specific 100-level breadth courses and three 300-level seminars within the concentration area.

Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience Concentration
Specified 100-level breadth courses, take both:
Cognitive Psychology
Mind and Brain
300-level seminars, choose three:
Memory Development from Infancy to Old Age
Higher Order Cognition
Psychology of Language
Educational Psychology
Health Care Reasoning and Decision-Making
Children's Thinking
Inside the Infant Mind
Cognition in Practice & Policy
Memory Under Construction
Attention and Attentional Failures
 
Developmental  Concentration
Specified 100-level breadth courses, take both:
Child Development
Adulthood and Aging
300-level seminars, choose three:
Memory Development from Infancy to Old Age
Seminar in Gender and Psychology
The Child In Family and Society
Educational Psychology
Children's Thinking
Inside the Infant Mind
Personality and Social Development in Childhood
Children and Narratives
Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Children, Psychology, and the Law
Emotional Development
Attachment Theory & Research: The Study of Close Relationships Across the Lifespan
Child and Adolescent Health Psychology
 
Social and Personality Concentration
Specified 100-level breadth courses, take both:
Social Psychology
Personality
300-level seminars, choose three:
Stress and Coping
The Psychology of Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination
Person Perception
Social Cognition
Seminar in Gender and Psychology
The Child In Family and Society
The Psychology of Human Goodness
Social Psychology and Social Issues
Personality and Social Development in Childhood
Children and Narratives
Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Emotional Development
Attachment Theory & Research: The Study of Close Relationships Across the Lifespan
Self and Identity

Clinical and Behavioral Health Concentration
Specified 100-level breadth courses, take both:
Abnormal Psychology
Personality
300-level seminars, choose three:
Stress and Coping
Health Psychology
The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders
Phenomenology and Theory of Childhood Disorders
Health Care Reasoning and Decision-Making
Psychological Assesssment
Clinical Psychology
Emotional Development
Sports Psychology
Child and Adolescent Health Psychology

Department Honors in Psychology

Students in either the B.A. or B.S. degree programs may undertake a program that leads to graduation with department honors. The honors program permits majors of unusual academic ability and interest to explore topics in greater depth than the curricula normally allow. Under faculty supervision, a student normally spends the first semester of the senior year enrolled in PSYC 391 doing library research, learning the appropriate methodology, and preparing a written proposal and oral presentation. In the second semester, while the student is enrolled in PSYC 392, the proposal is implemented, culminating in a written honors thesis and oral presentation.

In the junior year, students may apply for the honors program with the department Honors Program Director. To be eligible to participate in the honors program, a student must maintain overall and major GPAs of 3.5.

Minor Programs

General Psychology

The general psychology minor consists of a minimum of four courses in psychology beyond the introductory course (PSYC 001). Students should declare this minor in the Psychology Department office.

Clinical Psychology

The clinical psychology minor consists of the following courses beyond the introductory course (PSYC 001):

Required Courses12
Abnormal Psychology
Personality
Clinical Psychology
Elective Courses8
Select two of the following:
Stress and Coping
Health Psychology
Educational Psychology
Psychological Assesssment
Total Credits20

The clinical minor is available to Psychology majors as well as to students from other majors.  To complete the clinical minor, students must be prepared to register for at least one summer session since some courses (PSYC 367, PSYC 354) are most frequently offered in the summer, and other courses have limited enrollment during the academic year. Only one course may be used to jointly fulfill the requirements of a major program and minor program.

For Graduate Students

The Department of Psychology offers a distinctive, research-intensive graduate program centered on Human Cognition and Development with specializations in cognitive, developmental and social psychology.  The department accepts mainly Ph.D. students, who obtain a master’s degree in the process of working for the doctorate.  However, well-qualified students may also be accepted for a Master of Science degree.  Students are trained primarily for positions at universities, and in basic or applied research settings.  For more information visit: http://psychology.cas2.lehigh.edu/content/welcome-graduate-program-psychology.

In addition we offer two non-degree Certificate Programs in collaboration with other departments and programs.

The Graduate Certificate in Stereotypes, Prejudice, Discrimination, and Intergroup Relations is administered by the Psychology Department. Information is available via: http://psychology.cas2.lehigh.edu/content/stereotypes-prejudice-discrimination-and-intergroup-relations-graduate-certificate.

The Graduate Certificate in Cognitive Science is administered by the Cognitive Science Program. Information is available at: http://psychology.cas2.lehigh.edu/content/cognitive-science-graduate-certificate.

 

Requirements for a Ph.D. in the Department of Psychology

Research

All graduate students are expected to be involved in research throughout their graduate careers. There are also several formal research requirements of the program.

First-Year Apprenticeship

First-year students are expected to choose an advisor and begin to work on research projects as early as possible. An oral report of the student’s research activities is made to the department.  Students will submit a draft Master's Thesis Proposal by June 1 of the first year of the Ph.D. program.

Master’s Thesis

A master’s thesis (usually empirical or data-based) is required. An oral presentation of the thesis is made to the department. Students entering with a master’s degree may instead conduct an equivalent non-degree Pre-dissertation Project.

Third-Year independent scholarly activity 

Third year students will work toward formulation of their dissertation proposal by completing a literature review or writing a small grant proposal.  By the end of the third year of the Ph.D. program, students will choose a dissertation committee, and meet to report on their research activities.  

Doctoral Dissertation

This is an original piece of scholarly work usually involving empirical research, although original theoretical or historical research is possible with faculty approval.

Course work 

For the Ph.D., the minimum course requirements include:

  • Three core courses covering cognitive psychology (PSYC 403), developmental psychology (PSYC 402), and social cognition (PSYC406);
  • Two courses in statistics and research methodology (PSYC 421 and PSYC 422);
  • At least three graduate seminars (PSYC 430 and above);
  • Two elective courses, approved by the advisor;
  • A professional development seminar (PSYC 409) 

Teaching

Students are encouraged to participate in teaching as appropriate for their training throughout their graduate years. Normally, students begin as teaching assistants and progress to teaching independently.

General Examination

A general examination is required for all doctoral candidates and will be completed at the end of the second year of the Ph.D. program.  Readings and questions for the exam will be compiled by faculty in the student’s specialization area. 

 

Requirements for a Master of Science in the Department of Psychology

Research

Master of Science students will complete the First-Year Apprenticeship and Master’s Thesis requirements as described in the Ph.D. section above.

Coursework

For the M.Sc., the minimum course requirements include:

  • Two core courses covering cognitive psychology (PSYC 403), developmental psychology (PSYC 402), or social cognition (PSYC 406);
  • Two courses on statistics and research methodology (PSYC 421, and PSYC 422 or approved equivalent);
  • Two elective courses, approved by the advisor;
  • A professional development seminar (PSYC 409)

 

Evaluation 

Graduate students are evaluated on their performance in coursework, research and scholarship, teaching assistantship assignments, and the general examination.  The faculty provides each student with an annual written evaluation of their progress in the graduate program.

Financial Support

Support for Ph.D. students is available in the form of teaching and research assistantships, fellowships and scholarships.

How To Apply

Information about admission and financial aid can be obtained from the Department of Psychology or found at: https://psychology.cas2.lehigh.edu/node/67. While a strong undergraduate background in psychology is desirable, promising students with majors other than psychology are encouraged to apply.  Completed application forms, plus transcripts, letters of recommendation, and a report of scores on the Graduate Record Exam and advanced tests in psychology should be submitted no later than January 1 of the year of admission.  New students are normally accepted for entrance into the program only for the fall semester.

Courses

PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology 4 Credits

Psychology as a science of behavior. Natural science aspects such as learning, sensation-perception, and physiological bases; and social science aspects such as human development, intelligence, and personality. Methodologies appropriate to these areas, and related societal problems.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 107 Child Development 4 Credits

Survey of theories and research concerning perceptual, cognitive, social, and personality development through infancy and childhood. Prerequisites as noted below. May not be taken pass/fail. Open to Freshman with departmental permission.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or SSP 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 109 Adulthood and Aging 4 Credits

Social science approaches to the latter two-thirds of life. Cognitive and personality development; attitudes toward aging; social behavior of older adults; widowhood; retirement. Prerequisites as noted below. May not be taken pass/fail. Open to Freshman with departmental permission.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or SSP 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 110 Statistical Analysis of Behavioral Data 4 Credits

Principles of experimental design and statistical analysis: characteristics of data and data collection; descriptive statistics; hypothesis testing theory and practice; correlation, chi-square, t-test, analysis of variance. Three hours lecture and one hour computer lab. Department permission required. Open to Freshman with departmental permission.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 115 Religion and Psychology 4 Credits

A study of the origins, development and consequences of religion from a psychological perspective. Attention will be given to classic and contemporary sources, with a focus on major psychoanalytic theorists of religion (Freud, Jung, Erikson); psychological analyses of religious experience (e.g., Wm. James, Victor Frankl); and the diverse culture and religious forms that structure the connection between religion and psychology (e.g., Buddhist psychology, Japanese Morita therapy). Course examines the role of religion as a powerful meaning system that can affect the lives of individuals in terms of motivations, beliefs, emotions and behaviors, and can influence their interactions on both interpersonal and intergroup levels.

PSYC 117 Cognitive Psychology 4 Credits

The architecture and dynamics of the human mind: How we acquire knowledge through perception, represent and activate it in memory, and use it to communicate, make decisions, solve problems, and reason creatively. May not be taken pass/fail. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 121 Social Psychology 4 Credits

Theories, methods of investigation, and results of research on the way social and psychological processes interact in human behavioral settings. Topics include analysis of self and relationships, dynamics of small groups, attitudes and persuasion, prejudice, prosocial and antisocial behavior. Prerequisites as noted below. Open to Freshman with departmental permssion.
Prerequisites: ANTH 001 or SSP 001 or PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 138 Abnormal Psychology 4 Credits

Examines research and theory on the patterns, causes, and treatment of various forms of abnormal behavior. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 140 Introduction to Linguistics 4 Credits

Relationship between language and mind; formal properties of language; language and society; how languages change over time. No pass/fail option.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 153 Personality 4 Credits

Examination of the major theoretical frameworks psychologists use to understand human thought, feeling, and behavior. Whereas these frameworks each emphasize very different concepts (e.g., the unconscious mind vs. culture vs. neurotransmitters), they are united in their effort to answer the question: Why does a given individual think, feel, or behave as she does? Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or SSP 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 160 Independent Study 1-3 Credit

Readings on topics selected in consultation with a staff member. May be repeated for credit. Consent of faculty sponsor required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 161 Supervised Research 1-3 Credit

Apprenticeship in ongoing faculty research program. Literature review, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and professional writing under faculty supervision. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Consent of faculty sponsor required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 162 Psychological Field Work 1-3 Credit

Work-study practice including supervised experience in one of several local agencies. Development of familiarity with the operations of the agency and working with individual patients or students. Must have completed two additional psychology courses. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 176 Mind and Brain 4 Credits

Perception and cognitive neuroscience as the link between mental processes and their biological bases. Visual and auditory perception; the control of action; neuropsychological syndromes of perception, language, memory and thought; neural network (connectionist) models of mental processes. Prerequisites as noted below. May not be taken pass/fail.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: NS

PSYC 210 Experimental Research Methods and Laboratory 4 Credits

Designing, conducting, and reporting psychological experiments. Laboratory exercises, report writing, and a group research project. Consent of department required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001 and PSYC 110
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credit

PSYC 301 Industrial Psychology 4 Credits

Psychological concepts and methods applied to business and industrial settings. Personnel selection, placement and training, leadership, work motivation, job satisfaction and consumer behavior.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 302 Stress and Coping 4 Credits

How does stress affect the psychological system, and what psychological mechanisms are in place to help people overcome environmental stressors? This seminar examines classic and contemporary theories and research on stress, coping, and social support. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 121 or SSP 121 or PSYC 153 or SSP 153
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 304 Memory Development from Infancy to Old Age 4 Credits

Memory development throughout the lifespan. We will discuss methods invented to study memory in preverbal infants, and the amazing memory capacities they have revealed. We will explore memory components that develop during early and middle childhood, look at memory in adults, and consider the normal and pathological decline of memory in older age, and possible ways of slowing aging processes down. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or COGS 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 176 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 307 Higher Order Cognition 4 Credits

In depth exploration of selected areas of higher level cognition such as thinking and reasoning, metacognition, expertise, executive processes, language and thought. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 310 Advanced Research Methods in Psychology 4 Credits

Experimental and nonexperimental research design; Sampling and selection from populations; Data exploration; Quantitative and qualitative measurement and analysis; Computer-based data collection; and other specialized topics. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 210
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 311 The Psychology of Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination 4 Credits

We will start by examining the basic cognitive processes that make stereotyping a functional aspect of everyday cognition, and then we will turn toward examining emotional, motivational, and personality differences that affect one’s level of prejudice. Finally, we will study the role of social forces in transmitting prejudice (parents, schools, religion, media) and the impact of societal prejudice (discrimination) on those who are the targets of prejudice. The changing face through the decades of how stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination are measured, expressed, and understood is the focus of the course. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 153 or SSP 153 or PSYC 121 or SSP 121
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 313 Person Perception 4 Credits

Psychological processes involved in forming impressions of others. Survey of the factors that influence the way in which we think about the people who make up our social environment and of the laboratory methods with which experimental social psychology investigates person perception. The emphasis is on demonstrating the joint impact of the behaviors performed by others and the biases/expectancies that we bring into the social setting. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 153 or SSP 153 or PSYC 121 or SSP 121
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 314 Social Cognition 4 Credits

Examines the cognitive processes through which people make sense of social groups, individual others, themselves, and the world. Topics include judgment and decision making, attitudes and persuasion, ordinary personology, stereotyping and prejudice, and the self. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 121 or SSP 121
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 315 History of Modern Psychology 4 Credits

Origin and development of major theories within perception, cognition, biological, clinical, personality, developmental, learning. 19th and 20th century thought to provide an overview of psychology as a discipline. Must have completed two 300-level PSYC courses.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 317 Psychology of Emotion 4 Credits

A selective overview of the scientific study of emotion. Topics will include: historical and modern theories of emotion, physiological and neuropsychological aspects of emotions, evidence that facial expressions of emotion may be universal among humans, and the role of emotion in cognition. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 110
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 318 Seminar in Gender and Psychology 4 Credits

Gender as shaped by psychological and social psychological processes. Socialization, communication and power, gender stereotypes, methodological issues in sex differences research. Consent of department required. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 210
Can be taken Concurrently: PSYC 210
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 320 Psychology of Language 4 Credits

Psychological processes involved in language comprehension, production, and use. Topics include the relation of language to thought; word meaning; speech perception; language acquisition; sign language; language in society. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 321 Language Development 4 Credits

Descriptive and theoretical accounts of the development of language. Primary focus is on the development of spoken language in infancy and early childhood. Involves observation of children at various stages of language development. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107 or PSYC 117
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 323 The Child In Family and Society 4 Credits

Influences such as marital discord, family violence, poverty and prejudice on the development of the child from birth through adolescence. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: ANTH 001 or SSP 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 325 Theories in Social Psychology 4 Credits

This course will compare the contributions and limitations of major theoretical perspectives on social behavior, and examine the nature of theory-construction and theory-testing in psychology generally. We will discuss broad theories of social behavior (Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychodynamics, Symbolic Interactionism), as well as more specific theories of social phenomena, such as social perception, self-perception, and social influence. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 121 or SSP 121
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 327 Health Psychology 4 Credits

An overview of the topic of health psychology. The course presupposes a preventative intervention approach to the problem of assisting healthy individuals to understand the relationship between behavior and health, and to engage those behaviors that promote health. This course will be underpinned with basic science and research on health psychology, but will include an application focus.
Prerequisites: PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 328 Educational Psychology 4 Credits

Overview of historical, contemporary, and emerging issues in the field of educational psychology. Implications of various social, cognitive and behavioral educational-psychological theories for teaching and learning in the classroom. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107 or PSYC 117
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 332 The Psychology of Human Goodness 4 Credits

We begin with the Big Questions: Are human beings intrinsically good? How potent is our intrinsic capacity for goodness? What does it mean to be “good” or “moral”? How can we answer these questions? Next, we examine a variety of motives, capacities, and emotions that can promote our “good” behavior. Some examples include empathy, compassion (and other moral emotions), the justice motive, the norm enforcement motive, moral intuitions, social bonds, and perhaps even our general capacity for reason. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 121 or SSP 121
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 333 Social Psychology of Politics 4 Credits

Political behavior viewed from a psychological and social psychological perspective. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of department required.
Prerequisites: ANTH 001 or SSP 001 or PSYC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 334 The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders 4 Credits

The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 335 Animal Behavior 3 Credits

Discussion of the behavior of invertebrates and vertebrates and analysis of the physiological mechanisms responsible for behavioral actions, and adaptive value of specific behavior patterns. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: BIOS 120
Attribute/Distribution: NS

PSYC 338 Phenomenology and Theory of Childhood Disorders 4 Credits

The nature, classification, and treatment of childhood disorders. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 341 Social Psychology and Social Issues 4 Credits

This course examines the methods, concepts, and research findings associated with the effort to apply social psychology to the understanding and amelioration of social problems. Special attention will be paid to the topic of human conflict.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 342 Motivation 4 Credits

This seminar emphasizes theory and research on motivational approaches to social psychology. We will focus on the ways in which goals, motives, and needs guide behavior. We will explore such key issues as the nature of achievement, wellbeing, self-regulation and self-control; emotions, values, and belief-protection as sources of social action; and the role of motivated cognition in understanding the self and others. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 153 or SSP 153) or (PSYC 121 or SSP 121)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 344 Health Care Reasoning and Decision-Making 4 Credits

Health care professionals diagnose physical and mental illnesses and create treatment plans to improve their patients’ health. How do these professionals make decisions related to these important issues? We will explore the literature on how medical and mental health professionals reason and make decisions about health care issues. Topics to be covered include diagnosis, treatment decisions, access to care, and how these reasoning processes are swayed. Consideration will be given to patient decision-making as well. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 351 Children's Thinking 4 Credits

This course examines the development of children’s thinking from infancy through adolescence. We will discuss current research and theories on the content of children’s knowledge and how mental abilities develop. We will also consider the implications of research on children’s thinking for real-world questions about parenting, education, and policy-making. Topics include memory, concepts, social cognition, language, reading, mathematics, and individual and cultural differences. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107 or PSYC 117 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 354 Psychological Assesssment 4 Credits

Basic concepts in the construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment procedures commonly used in psychology. Selection and evaluation of assessment procedures. Supervised experience administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment procedures. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 110
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 356 Seminar In Personality Psychology 4 Credits

Topics in personality psychology: the self, personality consistency, motivation, psychological adjustment. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 153 or SSP 153
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 358 Inside the Infant Mind 4 Credits

How do babies understand and learn about the world? This course explores the origin and development of human knowledge by venturing inside the infant mind. Topics include current research and theory on infants’ understanding of objects, number, language, and people. Research examining thinking in non-human primates is also considered to shed light on what aspects of knowledge are and are not uniquely human. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107 or PSYC 117 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 359 Seminar on Psychological Issues in the Legal System 4 Credits

Contributions of psychological research to understanding the legal system. Social science data on juries, eyewitnesses, mental illness, and the death penalty will be discussed. Conflicts between psychological and legal approaches will be highlighted.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 361 Personality and Social Development in Adulthood 4 Credits

Theories and current research. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: SSP 109 or PSYC 109
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 362 Cognition in Practice & Policy 4 Credits

Taking the study of cognition from principle to practice, this course examines how basic research and theory informs understanding of human performance in real-world settings. Topics will be chosen from domains such as automobile safety, environmental and medical decision-making, human-technology interaction, spatial navigation, and breakdown of cognition under fatigue and alcohol. Public policy implications will be considered. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 363 Personality and Social Development in Childhood 4 Credits

Issues related to social development (e.g., attachment, social competence), social contexts (e.g., family, day care), and personality development (e.g., sex roles, aggression, temperament) from infancy through adolescence. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 364 Children and Narratives 4 Credits

Examines the complex role of narratives-told to and by children, and enacted by children in play-in children’s experience and development. Compares and seeks to integrate different approaches in psychology and other disciplines. In the process, we will also be addressing three basic questions: what is narrative, how is it significant, and how should we study it? Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 365 Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4 Credits

The formation of mind and personality is shaped in profound ways by the sociocultural contexts within which individuals develop. This course introduces students to basic theoretical and methodological issues and explores important examples of cross-cultural variation and diversity, using comparisons between different societies and between different subcultures within American society. Topics include cognition, language, personality, moral development, socio-emotional development, identity, attachment, and socialization. Materials drawn from anthropology, sociology and education in addition to psychology. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 109 or PSYC 107 or PSYC 121 or SSP 121 or ANTH 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 366 Seminar In Cognitive Aging 4 Credits

Information processing by older adults: perception, attention, memory, speech and text processing and comprehension. The course will also examine the effects on cognitive processing of such diseases as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 109
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 367 Clinical Psychology 4 Credits

The science and profession of helping people overcome psychological problems. Theories of human personality and abnormality in relation to techniques for assessing and treating psychosocial problems and in the light of empirical evidence of validity and effectiveness. Professional issues are also covered. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 153 or SSP 153) and (PSYC 138)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 368 Children, Psychology, and the Law 4 Credits

Covers psychological research on child witnesses, child victims, juvenile crime, children’s rights and decision-making capabilities, divorce and custody. Implications of psychological research for social policy and legal reform will be discussed. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 369 Memory Under Construction 4 Credits

Investigation of the constructive nature of human memory through hands-on exercises, reading and discussion. Includes exploration of personal memories, a memory expanding project, and a final project. Coverage includes autobiographical memory, expert memory, and memory disorders. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 007
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 377 Attention and Attentional Failures 4 Credits

Attention allows us to function in complex environments where there is more information than we could possibly process all at once and failures of attention can have drastic consequences. Experimental and neuropsychological evidence will be surveyed for topics including basic attentional phenomena, the role of attention in everyday tasks, and the impact of attentional failures from mind wandering to neuropsychological deficits like ADHD. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 007 or COGS 117 or COGS 176
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 378 Emotional Development 4 Credits

The course will cover selected topics in emotional development from infancy through adulthood. Topics will include: infant attachment (learning to love), romantic attachment (being in love), emotion regulation, sympathy/empathy, anger/aggression, temperament, etc. We will also discuss the ways in which significant relationships with peers and parents shape children’s emotional development. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107

PSYC 380 Sports Psychology 4 Credits

Theory, research and application comprise this focal area of psychology. The course will allow students to explore the theory and research giving rise to individual, team, and peak performance assessment and interventions. Topics will include assessment, affect modulation, imagery, cognitive formulation, and psychodynamic development. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 110 or PSYC 153 or SSP 153

PSYC 381 Special Topics In Psychology 4 Credits

Topics vary from semester to semester. Topics are presented at an advanced level. Previous course work in psychology and consent of faculty sponsor is required. May be repeated for credit.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

PSYC 382 Endocrinology of Behavior 3 Credits

Hormonal effects upon animal and human behavior. Emphasis on neuroendocrinology of steroid hormone involvement in reproductive behaviors. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: BIOS 120
Attribute/Distribution: NS

PSYC 383 Attachment Theory & Research: The Study of Close Relationships Across the Lifespan 4 Credits

This course will examine the influence of close relationships across the lifespan on personality development. We will examine the influence of parents, peers, siblings, and romantic relationships using traditional attachment theory. In addition, we will also explore how attachment quality is measured and the clinical applications of attachment theory. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 384 Self and Identity 4 Credits

We will examine different types of identity (e.g., personal, relational, collective) and the cognitive processes that allow for a multifaceted yet unified sense of self. We will study how self-related motives (e.g., enhancement, consistency, distinctiveness) influence self-knowledge, self-regulation, and mental health. Finally, we will explore the origins of self from evolutionary, neuroscientific, and cultural perspectives. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 121 or SSP 121 or PSYC 153 or SSP 153
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 386 Child and Adolescent Health Psychology 4 Credits

Focuses on developmental research and theory related to health and wellness issues in children and adolescents. Topics include children's understanding of biology and disease, disease management, medical consent, education and policy efforts to promote children's health.Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107
Attribute/Distribution: SS

PSYC 389 Honors Project 1-8 Credit

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

PSYC 391 Thesis 4 Credits

Written report: Literature review and design of project in selected area of psychology. Only open to students in the honors program. Consent of Honors Program Coordinator required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PSYC 210
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 392 Thesis 3 Credits

Execution of project designed in PSYC 391. Final report and oral presentation. Only open to students in the honors program. Consent of Honors Program Coordinator required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 391)
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 393 Independent Research 1-3 Credit

Individual research projects designed and executed in collaboration with faculty sponsor. Regular meetings with sponsor to give progress reports and receive feedback. Student reads relevant literature and writes report in APA format. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites as noted below. Consent of faculty sponsor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: PSYC 210 or PSYC 161
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 394 Senior Research Project 3 Credits

Literature review, design and execution of project in selected area of psychology. Intended for senior majors in psychology. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Consent of faculty sponsor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

PSYC 402 Developmental Psychology 3 Credits

Survey of theories and research concerning perceptual, cognitive, social, and personality development through infancy and childhood. Must have graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PSYC 403 Cognitive Psychology 3 Credits

Survey of theories and research in cognitive psychology. Must have graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PSYC 404 Behavioral Neuroscience 3 Credits

Theoretical and empirical issues in biopsychology. Must have graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PSYC 406 Social Cognition 3 Credits

Theory and research on cognitive processes in personality and social functioning. The self, personality consistency and change, causal attributions, social judgment, goals and self-regulation, and mood and emotion. Topics may vary. Must have graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PSYC 409 Professional Seminar I 1 Credit

For students entering the Ph.D. program: Acculturation to graduate school and the Psychology Ph.D. program in particular; professional issues of relevance to individuals at the outset of a research career in psychology. Department permission required.

PSYC 410 Professional Seminar II 1 Credit

For students nearing graduation: Professional issues of special relevance to Psychology Ph.D. students preparing for academic or nonacademic postdoctoral employment. Department permission required.

PSYC 412 First Year Research Project 1-3 Credit

Research project or paper to be completed by June of the first year of the Ph.D. program under the direction of a faculty advisor. May be repeated in second semester of program.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

PSYC 421 Statistical Analysis of Psychological Data I 3 Credits

First of a two-semester sequence covering essential issues in statistical analysis as practiced by psychologists. Topics include data description, probability, z and t-tests, general linear model, simple correlation/regression, univariate analysis of variance, chi-square. Emphasis on connecting research designs to appropriate statistical tests, data interpretation, and implementation in statistical packages. Department permission required.

PSYC 422 Statistical Analysis of Psychological Data II 3 Credits

Second course of the two-semester statistics sequence. Topics include advanced analysis of variance designs, analysis of covariance, multivariate analysis, multiple regression, and analysis of categorical data. Emphasis on connecting research designs to appropriate statistical tests, data interpretation, and implementation in statistical packages. Consent of department required. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 421

PSYC 423 Foundations of Cognitive Science 3 Credits

Survey of fundamental theory and methodologies from artificial intelligence, linguistics, cognitive psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience, as well as salient research problems such as knowledge acquisition and representation, natural language processing, skill acquisition, perception and action, and the philosophical question of intentionality.

PSYC 433 Cognitive Neuroscience Techniques 3 Credits

This glimpse into the toolkit of modern cognitive neuroscience will provide an overview of a range of techniques from psychopharmacology and single cell recording, to human neuroimaging and neuropsychology. The course introduces different techniques with a focus on issues of temporal and spatial resolution of different methods, the costs and benefits of various techniques, and the appropriateness of techniques for different types of research questions. Students will develop the skills to be knowledgeable consumers of the modern literatures in psychology and related fields that are increasingly incorporating a range of neuroscience methods.
Prerequisites: PSYC 403

PSYC 443 Seminar In Language Acquisition 3 Credits

Special topics in language acquisition. Content will vary each time the seminar is offered. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402 or PSYC 403

PSYC 446 Developmental Theories and Special Populations 3 Credits

Traditional developmental theories focus on normative development. Children with disabilities have a unique set of experiences that pose special challenges for these theories. In the developmental literature, children with disabilities have sometimes been the focus of studies because they provide a “tests case” for specific theoretical predictions. In this course, we will consider some of these theoretical issues and the insights that have been gained by focusing on special populations. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402

PSYC 448 Seminar in Psychology of Language 3 Credits

Topics in language comprehension and production. Content will vary from year to year. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 403

PSYC 450 Special Topics in Mathematical Models and Statistics 3 Credits

Selected topics in the application of mathematics to psychological research. May be repeated for credit.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

PSYC 460 Special Study 1-9 Credit

Study of some special topic not covered in the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

PSYC 461 Research Seminar 1-9 Credit

Original research designed and executed in collaboration with the faculty. May be repeated for credit.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

PSYC 462 Stereotypes, Prejudice, Discrimination 3 Credits

An in-depth survey of the social psychological literature on stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. Topics will include: Origin of stereotypes, mental representation of stereotypes, cognitive and behavioral consequences of stereotypes, inevitability of stereotyping, nature of prejudice in contemporary American society, context-specificity of discriminatory behavior, and theories of intergroup conflict reduction. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 406

PSYC 464 Naive Realism in Social Judgement 3 Credits

This seminar examines the variety of unconscious influences that impact on social judgment, with a focus on the cognitive processing mechanisms through which influence is exerted. These influences include contributions to judgment from attitudes, goals, accessible constructs, mindsets, stereotypes, expectancies, heuristics, and theories about social objects. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402

PSYC 466 Prosocial Cognition, Emotion, and Behavior 3 Credits

In this course we will examine such phenomena as compassion, caregiving, sympathy, justice motivation, and helping. We will begin with an examination of human nature: Is prosociality fundamental to human nature? Subsequently, we will examine how prosociality can be nurtured by particular developmental experiences. Finally, we will examine the literature on the nature of prosociality in adulthood: What cognitive capacities support prosociality? What situational factors promote prosociality? What emotional qualities promote prosociality? What belief systems are linked to prosociality?.
Prerequisites: PSYC 406

PSYC 476 Seminar In Cognition 3 Credits

Selected topics in human information processing, including such areas as attention, memory, language and comprehension, and decision-making. Area of emphasis will vary from year to year. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 403

PSYC 478 Ontological Psychology 3 Credits

Principles and constraints for the modeling of psychological phenomena: Representation, perception, memory, knowing, emotions, consciousness, language, and rationality.

PSYC 480 Seminar in Cognitive Development 3 Credits

Selected topics in cognitive development in infancy and childhood, including such areas as conceptual development, memory development, the development of reasoning abilities, and language acquisition. Emphasis will vary from year to year. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402

PSYC 481 Selected Topics in Social and Personality Development 3 Credits

Topics include emotional and sex-role development, peer relations, and social competence. Emphasis will vary from year to year. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402

PSYC 482 Seminar In Adult Development 3 Credits

Application of lifespan developmental theory and methodology to personality, social, and cognitive development in adulthood. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402

PSYC 483 Seminar In Cultural Psychology 3 Credits

Major theoretical approaches and empirical debates in cultural psychology, with a focus on the interplay of individual and sociocultural elements in the formation of mind, the emergence of the self, and the definition and reproduction of culture. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: PSYC 402

PSYC 484 Psychology of Gender 3 Credits

Major theoretical approaches and empirical debates in the psychology of gender, with a focus on the interplay of nature and nurture in producing gender similarities, gender differences and gender variation in personality, social behaviors, cognitive abilities, achievement, sexuality, and mental health. Methodological issues in gender research. Consent of instructor required.

PSYC 490 Thesis Research 1-6 Credit

Master's Thesis or Pre-dissertation Project research directed by committee.

PSYC 495 Narrative & Psychology 3 Credits

This course explores the increasing significance of narrative analysis in psychology by delineating the conceptual foundations of a narrative perspective and considering arguments for narrative as an integrative paradigm in psychological research. Particular emphasis will be on the constitutive role of narrative in cognitive and socio-emotional development, the formation of identity, moral understanding, and other domains. Some specific topics will be narrative development, autobiographical memory, self-narrative, identity development, narratives of conflict, and the role of narrative in socialization and education.

PSYC 499 Dissertation Research 1-15 Credit

Ph.D. dissertation research directed by dissertation committee.

Professors. Diane T. Hyland, PhD (Syracuse University); Barbara C. Malt, PhD (Stanford University); Gordon B. Moskowitz, PhD (New York University); Ageliki Nicolopoulou, PhD (University of California Berkeley)

Associate Professors. Catherine M. Arrington, PhD (Michigan State University); Susan E Barrett, PhD (Brown University); Michael J. Gill, PhD (University Texas Austin); Deborah Laible, PhD (University of Nebraska-Lincoln); Padraig G O'Seaghdha, PhD (University of Toronto)

Assistant Professors. Amanda C. Brandone, PhD (University of Michigan Ann Arbor); Christopher T. Burke, PhD (New York University); Almut Hupbach, PhD (Universitat Trier); Jessecae Marsh, PhD (Yale University); Dominic J. Packer, PhD (University of Toronto)

Emeriti. William Newman, PhD (Stanford University); Martin L. Richter, PhD (Indiana State Univer); George K. Shortess, PhD (Brown University)