2016-17 Catalog

Sociology and Anthropology

Web site: http://socanthro.cas2.lehigh.edu/. The department houses two disciplines, sociology and anthropology. Sociology is concerned with the study of human beings in relationships with others. Anthropology takes a holistic approach to the study of humans today and in the past, in a global, comparative, and multidimensional perspective. Together these disciplines encompass the study of the broadest range of human activities, from the comparative examination of widely divergent past and present cultures and societies, to the inner life of individuals as this influences social behavior, to an examination of the most pressing social issues of our time.

The offerings within the department seek to foster self and societal awareness as well as an understanding of what it means to be human. Instruction within the department also provides students with the necessary analytic skills to understand and conduct social research. Central to the department's major programs is training in research methods, statistics, and the use of computer applications in social science.

The department offers three bachelor of arts majors: anthropology, sociology and anthropology, and sociology. The three programs are parallel in structure and requirements and each consists of 40 credit hours of course work. The sociology and anthropology major is an interdisciplinary program for students desiring a wider familiarity with social science fields, whereas the anthropology and sociology majors are for students desiring more traditional, disciplinary programs of study.

Research Opportunities

It is the explicit aim of the department to involve majors, minors and other interested students in the ongoing research activities of faculty members. Second semester sophomore, junior and senior students interested in a supervised research experience are encouraged to consult with the chair or appropriate faculty member. Course credit can be received for research experience.

Internship Opportunities

The department maintains close working relationships with a variety of social agencies and institutions in the area. Majors can earn course credit by carrying out supervised work in field settings—see http://socanthro.cas2.lehigh.edu/ for more details. This experience allows a student to apply the concepts learned in the classroom to a field setting and to evaluate vocational aspirations and interests.

Senior Thesis

All majors are encouraged to do independent research culminating in a senior thesis; this is especially recommended for students intending to go on to graduate or professional school. The time to begin discussing possible projects with faculty is during the second semester of the junior year. The department chairperson should be consulted for further details. Our web site has additional information.

Departmental Honors

To be eligible for departmental honors, students must have at least a 3.5 GPA in the major. In addition, students pursuing honors must take ANTH or SOC 399 and write a thesis during their senior year. Awarding of departmental honors is contingent on both the quality of the thesis, as judged by a department committee, and the candidate's GPA at time of graduation.

B.A. Major Programs

Anthropology

Collateral Requirement
Select one of the following general courses in statistics:3-4
Basic Statistics 1
Statistical Methods
Statistical Analysis of Behavioral Data
Or equivalent
Introductory
ANTH 011Cultural Diversity and Human Nature4
ANTH 012Human Evolution and Prehistory4
Methodology
SOAN 111Research Methods and Data Analysis (fall)4
Major Electives
Select five anthropology courses 220
Research, Internship, or Thesis
Select one of the following: 34
Apprentice Teaching
Supervised Research
Field School
Internship
Senior Thesis 4
Total Credits39-40
1

Note: MATH 012 fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences requirement.

2

At least two of which must be at the 300-level. Individualized study courses ANTH 300, ANTH 393, ANTH 394, ANTH 395, and ANTH 399 cannot be used to fulfill this requirement; however, one SOC course can be substituted as an anthropology elective.

3

Preferably during the senior year, majors must complete at least four credits of experiential learning on a subject or in a context relevant to their major. Students may fulfill this requirement in a variety of ways - research, field school, internship, or thesis.

4

Students who intend going on to graduate or professional school are strongly encouraged to do the senior thesis option, and a senior thesis is required for departmental honors.

Concentrations within the Anthropology Major

Anthropology majors may choose to concentrate in cultural or archaeological anthropology. These optional concentrations in one or the other subfield entail additional constraints on course selection within the major electives category, as described below.

Concentration in Cultural Anthropology

Anthropology majors electing to concentrate in cultural anthropology must complete at least four courses in cultural anthropology at the 100-level or above. Regular course offerings that would satisfy this concentration include the following:

Select at least four of the following:16
Cultural Studies and Globalization
Comparative Cultures
Environment and Culture
Anthropology of Gender
Introduction to Linguistics
North American Indians
Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
Anthropology Of Fishing
Global Capitalism
Economic Anthropology
Food For Thought
Religion, Witchcraft And Magic
Culture and the Individual
Total Credits16

Students choosing this concentration are strongly encouraged to use their general education electives to complete at least two physical anthropology/archaeology courses; the equivalent of two years of foreign language study; pursue courses in museum studies, mathematics, computer science, philosophy, religion studies, literature, biology, and geology as specific interests dictate; and take a wide range of courses in the social sciences, generally, such as SOC 001, PSYC 001, POLS 003, IR 010, ECO 001, and history offerings.

Concentration in Archaeological Anthropology

Anthropology majors electing to concentrate in archaeological anthropology must complete at least four courses in archaeological anthropology at the 100-level or above. Regular course offerings that would satisfy this concentration include the following:

Select at least four of the following:16
Doing Archaeology
Environment and Culture
Human Evolution
North American Archaeology
Greek Archaeology
Roman Archaeology
Mesoamerican Archaeology
Archaeological Theory
Historical Archeology
Archaeology Of Death
Field School
Total Credits16

Students choosing this concentration are strongly encouraged to use their general education electives to complete at least three courses in cultural anthropology; pursue courses in museum studies, mathematics, computer science, history, and the social sciences as interests dictate; and take a wide range of natural science courses of special relevance to archaeologists.

Sociology and Anthropology

Collateral Requirement
Select one the following general courses in statistics:3-4
Basic Statistics 1
Statistical Methods
Statistical Analysis of Behavioral Data
Or equivalent
Introductory
ANTH 011Cultural Diversity and Human Nature4
SOC 001Introduction to Sociology4
Theory and Methodology
SOAN 111Research Methods and Data Analysis (fall)4
SOAN 112Development Of Social Theory (spring)4
Major Electives
Select three courses in sociology 2,312
Select three courses in anthropology 2,412
Total Credits43-44
1

Note: MATH 012 fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences' mathematics requirement.

2

One of which must be at the 300-level.

3

Individualized study courses SOC 300, SOC 393,  SOC 395, and SOC 399 can be taken as major electives but cannot be used to fulfill the 300 level course requirement.

4

Individualized study courses ANTH 300, ANTH 393, ANTH 394, ANTH 395, ANTH 395, and ANTH 399 can be taken as major electives but cannot be used to fulfill the 300 level course requirement.

Sociology

Collateral Requirement
Select one of the following general courses in statistics:3-4
Basic Statistics 1
Statistical Methods
Statistical Analysis of Behavioral Data
Or equivalent
Introductory
Theory and Methodology
SOC 001Introduction to Sociology4
SOAN 111Research Methods and Data Analysis (fall)4
SOAN 112Development Of Social Theory (spring)4
Major Electives
Select five courses in sociology 220
Research, Internship, or Thesis
Select one of the following: 34
SOC 300Apprentice Teaching1-4
SOC 393Supervised Research1-4
SOC 395Internship1-4
SOC 399Senior Thesis2-4
Total Credits44-56
1

Note: MATH 012 fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences' mathematics requirement.)

2

At least two of which must be at the 300-level. Individualized study courses SOC 300, SOC 393SOC 395 and SOC 399 cannot be used to fulfill this requirement; however, one ANTH course can be substituted as a "sociology" elective.

3

Preferably during the senior year, majors must complete at least four credits of experiential learning on a subject or in a context relevant to their major. Students may fulfill this requirement in a variety of ways: supervised research, field school, internship, or thesis.

4

Students who go on to graduate or professional school are strongly encouraged to do the senior thesis option, and a senior thesis is required for departmental honors.

Minor Programs

Anthropology

ANTH 011Cultural Diversity and Human Nature4
or ANTH 012 Human Evolution and Prehistory
Select any four courses in Anthropology16
Total Credits20

Sociology and Anthropology

ANTH 011Cultural Diversity and Human Nature4
or SOC 001 Introduction to Sociology
Select two courses in sociology at the 100 level or above8
Select two courses in anthropology at the 100 level or above8
Total Credits20

Sociology

SOC 001Introduction to Sociology4
Select any four courses in Sociology16
Total Credits20

Graduate Courses in Sociology

The Master's Program in Sociology prepares students to apply sociological perspectives and methods to the analysis of social realities. Grounded in a strong theoretical and substantive understanding of social institutions, social relations, and social policy, as well as in advanced research and data analytic skills, students are prepared to be effective and experienced practitioners in the field of applied social research or to continue into doctoral studies in the field.

Sociology MA program

The Sociology MA program requires 30 hours of course work. Required courses are:

Quantitative Research3
Statistics for Sociological Inquiry3
Qualitative Research3
Social Theory3
Select six electives18
Total Credits30

All students take a comprehensive exam. Students choose whether to write a thesis.

Community Fellows Program

Applicants for the Sociology MA program may also choose to apply to the Community Fellows Program, a one year Master’s Program in which students work for 15 hours a week in a non-profit organization as part of their academic experience. Please see the program website at www.lehigh.edu/communityfellows.

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 011 Cultural Diversity and Human Nature 4 Credits

A cross-cultural investigation of variation in human societies. Examines forms of social organization, kinship, religion, symbolism, and language through the consideration of specific cultural case studies in local and global contexts. Students will learn how anthropological research methods enhance understanding of contemporary social issues, help solve real-world problems, and foster an informed perspective on what it means to be human.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 012 Human Evolution and Prehistory 4 Credits

Introductory biological anthropology and prehistory. Adaptive functions of human culture and its relation to biological evolution. Mechanisms of evolution, non-human primate morphology and behavior, hominid fossil record, cultural beginnings, and survey of world prehistory.
Attribute/Distribution: NS

ANTH 100 Seminar in Anthropology 1-4 Credits

Topics in anthropology.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 106 (GS 106) Cultural Studies and Globalization 4 Credits

This course closely examines the complex relationship between culture and globalization. The impact of globalization on local culture is an essential topic. But the interaction of globalization and culture is not a one-way process. People around the world adapt globalization to their own uses, merging global cultural flows with local practices in transformative ways. The course will study the interaction of local culture with globalizing forces; immigration and culture; the localizing of mass culture; cultures of diasporic and migratory groups, and globalization, gender and identity.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 111 Comparative Cultures 4 Credits

Anthropology is a comparative discipline; through comparisons we learn what is unique to a particular culture, what is shared among a number of cultures, and how trait, idea, practice or belief are related to each other. Students will learn how anthropologists do comparisons and do their own comparative research utilizing both qualitative and quantitative techniques.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 112 (CLSS 112) Doing Archaeology 4 Credits

Principles of archaeological method and theory. Excavation and survey methods, artifact analysis, dating techniques, and cultural reconstruction. Includes field project.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 121 (ES 121) Environment and Culture 4 Credits

Impact of environment upon cultural variability and change. Comparative study of modern and past cultures and their environments as well as current theories of human/ environmental interaction.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 123 (WGSS 123) Anthropology of Gender 4 Credits

Comparative study of the meanings and social roles associated with gender. Psychological, symbolic, and cultural approaches.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 139 (JST 139, REL 139) Jewish Folklore 4 Credits

Examines the transformation of folk and popular Judaism from the Old World, through the period of immigration to America, to ethnic and later forms of American Jewish culture. Attention paid to concept of folklore revivals and their meanings. Four case studies: folk tales and storytelling, klezmer music, lifecycle rituals, and food.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 140 (COGS 140, MLL 140) Introduction to Linguistics 4 Credits

Relationship between language and mind; formal properties of language; language and society; how languages change over time. May not be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 145 Human Evolution 4 Credits

Principles of biological anthropology focusing on the evolution of the human species. Topics include evolutionary theory, nonhuman primate diversity and behavior, the relationship between biology and behavior in evolutionary terms, the hominid fossil record, and genetic variability among contemporary human populations.
Attribute/Distribution: NS

ANTH 155 (HMS 155) Medical Anthropology 4 Credits

Medical Anthropology is the study of how conceptions of health, illness, and healing methods vary over time and across cultures. Students will learn how social and cultural factors shape health outcomes in a variety of human contexts, and will study culturally specific approaches to healing, including Western bio-medicine. The course offers a broad understanding of the relationship between culture, health, and healing.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 172 North American Archaeology 4 Credits

Development of prehistoric North American indigenous population north of Mexico, beginning with earliest evidence of people in the New World continuing up through European contact.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 174 (ARCH 174, ART 174, CLSS 174) Greek Archaeology 3-4 Credits

Ancient Greek culture from the Neolithic to Hellenistic periods. Reconstructions of Greek social dynamics from study of artifacts.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 175 Britain After the Romans 4 Credits

Exploration of the archaeological record of the British Isles from the Roman Invasion until the Middle Ages. Focuses on the long-term impacts of incorporation into the Roman Empire on the indigenous cultures of Britain, the culture instability that accompanied the collapse of Roman rule, and the subsequent waves of invasion and immigration from Western Europe that followed. Regional variations within and between various island cultures are addressed.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 176 (ARCH 176, ART 176, CLSS 176) Roman Archaeology 4 Credits

Cultures of the Roman Empire. Reconstructions of social, political, and economic dynamics of the imperial system from study of artifacts.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 177 Britain Before the Romans 4 Credits

Exploration of the archaeological record of the earliest inhabitants of the British Isles. Focusing primarily on the Paleolithic and Neolithic cultures of ancient Britain, this course examines the transition from foragers to farmers, the construction of monumental earthworks and stoneworks like Avebury and Stonehenge, and culture connections beyond the islands. Regional variations within and between various island cultures are also addressed.

ANTH 178 Mesoamerican Archaeology 4 Credits

Ancient civilizations of Mesoamerica: Olmec, Zapotec, Maya, Toltec, and Aztec. Reconstructions of urban centers, political and economic organizations, and theories of the Mayan collapse.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 182 North American Indians 4 Credits

Culture areas of native North America prior to substantial disruption by European influences north of Mexico. Environmental factors and cultural forms.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 183 (AAS 183) Peoples and Cultures of Africa 4 Credits

Studies African modernity through a close reading of ethnographies, social stories, novels, and African feature films.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 184 (LAS 184) Indigenous Cultures of Latin America 4 Credits

This course examines social change in Latin America from the perspective of indigenous peoples. Main goals are to develop an appreciation for the diversity of cultures found in Latin America, explore anthropological concepts like cultural ecology, ethnicity, acculturation, and religious syncretism, and to apply these concepts to contemporary issues, including cultural survival, human rights, and environmental sustainability.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 187 (ASIA 187) Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia 4 Credits

Peoples and cultures of Burma, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. World view, religion, economy, politics, and social organization.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 188 (ASIA 188) Southeast Asian Migrants and Refugees 4 Credits

Focus on migrants and refugees from Southeast Asia to the United States; examines cultures and practices while in Southeast Asia, the migration process, and the ways in which the people and their cultural practices have changed in the United States.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ANTH 305 Anthropology Of Fishing 4 Credits

Comparative study of fishing peoples and their technologies. Fishing strategies, control of information, and social organization of marine exploitation in subsistence and modern industrial contexts. Theory of common property resources and the role of social science in commercial fisheries management.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 312 The Anthropological Signature of the Past 4 Credits

covers the basic tenets of different anthropological analyses of premodern cultures. Emphasis on the archaeological traces of different social constructions in the past.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 320 (GS 320) Global Capitalism 4 Credits

Anthropological approach to the forms and effects of global capitalism. Topics include the structure of contemporary global capitalism, including the growth of multinational corporations, flexible corporate strategies, overseas manufacturing, and global branding and marketing; the impact of global capitalism on the environment and on the lives of people in "Third World" countries; consumer culture and the diversity of non-Western consumption practices; alternative capitalist systems.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 324 (AAS 324, GS 324) Globalization and Development in Africa 4 Credits

examines the challenges Africa presents to expectations of modernization and development. Have African societies been left behind by globalization, shut out from it, or do they reflect an unexpected side of globalization processes? What is Africa’s place in the neoliberal world order? What role does “African culture” play in generating or blocking social change? How can anthropology illuminate prospects for change on what has long been regarded as the “dark continent”?
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 325 Economic Anthropology 4 Credits

Cross-cultural perspectives on the ways people produce, distribute, and consume goods; how these systems are organized; and how they are connected with other aspects of society, particularly political and ideological systems.
Prerequisites: ANTH 001 or ANTH 011 or SOC 005 or SOC 021 or PSYC 021 or SOC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 330 Food For Thought 4 Credits

Symbolic and cultural analyses of foods and cuisines. Examines what people eat, who prepares it, what it means, and the social and religious uses of foods historically and cross-culturally.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 335 (REL 335) Religion, Witchcraft And Shamanism 4 Credits

Addresses broad questions about supernatural beliefs as systems of meaning and as practical and moral guides, with a focus on theoretical explanations for supernatural beliefs and the function of religious specialists in the social organization of cultures.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 337 (ASIA 337, REL 337) Buddhism and Society 4 Credits

The course approaches Buddhism as a lived tradition rather than as a textual tradition. We examine how Buddhist practices are integrated into local traditions and how religious practices become part of the larger social, political, and value systems. Societies examined include Thailand, Nepal, Japan, China, and the U. S. Students will develop a comparative framework that includes Theravada, Tibetan, and Zen Buddhism.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 339 Seminar In Anthropology 4 Credits

Topics in anthropology. Varying semester to semester: human evolution, politics and law, introduction to linguistics, human use of space, anthropology of deviance.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: ANTH 001 or ANTH 011 or SOC 005 or SOC 021 or PSYC 021 or SOC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 340 Archaeological Theory 4 Credits

Explores important issues in the interpretation of archaeological material. Issues include variable utility of anthropological analogies, unevenness of data, reconstructions of past cultures, processual and post-processual approaches. Students will write a sample NSF proposal.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 352 (ES 352) Environmental Archaeology 4 Credits

This course reviews the various categories of archaeological data used to examine the nature of past human-environmental relationships. We will explore how archaeologists use data to recognize anthropogenic and natural environmental changes, as well as cultural adaptations to local environments.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 370 (HIST 370) Historical Archeology 3-4 Credits

This course exams the unique nature of historical archaeology of post contact America. Topics include reconstructing the past through the archaeological and historical record, exhibiting past culture, and capturing the real or imagined past. Course includes fieldwork and visits to famous historical archaeological sites.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 371 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Advanced work through supervised readings. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 376 Culture and the Individual 4 Credits

Concepts and methods of studying relations between the individual and the sociocultural milieu. Culture and personality language and thought, cross-cultural studies of cognition.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 377 Archaeology Of Death 4 Credits

examines what we can determine about the past from human remains. Class will study health, age, and disease from the analysis of human bone, the cultural aspects of burial and funerals, and take part in a field project in Nisky Hill Cemetery in Bethlehem.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 378 (LAS 378) Blood, Pyramids, and the Tree of Life 4 Credits

This course explores the ways of life of the Maya people. We will take a close look at their religion, their foods, their family life, music, medicine, festivals, etc. An important part of this class explores the long tradition of the Maya, making connections between the modern Maya and the Maya of their past.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 389 Honors Project 1-8 Credits

ANTH 393 Supervised Research 1-4 Credits

Conducting anthropological research under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 394 Field School 1-8 Credits

Field school in archaeology or ethnography. Maximum of eight credits for a single season or field experience.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 395 Internship 1-4 Credits

Supervised experience involving nonpaid work in a setting relevant to anthropology. Open only to department majors.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ANTH 399 Senior Thesis 2-4 Credits

Research during senior year culminating in senior thesis. Required for anthropology majors seeking departmental honors. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

Sociology and Anthropology Courses

SOAN 041 (WGSS 041) Human Sexuality 4 Credits

Sexuality and gender roles across the life cycle, including human reproduction, decision-making, and the societal regulation of sexual behavior.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

SOAN 042 (WGSS 042) Sexual Minorities 4 Credits

How minority sexual identities have been the subject of speculation, misunderstanding, and sometimes violent attempts at correction or elimination. Sexual orientation, gender role, including transvestism and "drag", transsexualism, sexism, heterosexism, and homophobia. Emphasis on critical thinking, guest speakers, and discussions.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOAN 111 Research Methods and Data Analysis 4 Credits

Research skills in anthropology, sociology and social psychology. Problem formulation; research design; methods and measures; analysis and interpretation of data. Emphasis on the use of statistics in the research process.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOAN 112 Development Of Social Theory 4 Credits

This course introduces some of the most influential theoretical ideas in sociology. It focuses on understanding the differences among several classical theoretical traditions and their strengths and weaknesses in analyzing societies. It also helps students learn to apply social theory to contemporary sociological research and problems, learning the ways theory can be used to answer questions and problems societies face today.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOAN 381 Development of Social Theory 4 Credits

Comparative study of social theory.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

Sociology Courses

SOC 001 Introduction to Sociology 4 Credits

Patterns of social interaction, group behavior and attitudes provide a focus on the relationship of the individual to society. Social structure and social change within the institutions of society provide a focus on the relationship of society to the individual. The influences of social class, gender and race are explored at each level of analyses. Theories, methods and research results provide micro and macro models for understanding society.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 100 Seminar in Sociology 1-4 Credits

Topics in sociology.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 103 (AAS 103) Race and Ethnicity in the Contemporary U.S. 4 Credits

examines race and ethnicity from a sociological perspective. Focus on the role of the major racial and ethnic communities in modern American society. Explores the roles of race and ethnicity in identity, social relations, and social inequality. Topics include racial and ethnic communities, minority/majority groups, assimilation, prejudice and discrimination, identity, and the social construction of the concept of "race.".
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 104 (POLS 104) Political Sociology 4 Credits

An introduction to political sociology through an examination of the major sociological questions concerning power, politics, and the state. Covers questions concerning state formation, nationalism, social movements, globalization, political culture and participation, and civil society.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 105 Social Origins Of Terrorism 4 Credits

Examines the social, religious, and political foundations of terrorism by studying the roots of terrorism historically and cross-nationally. We will look at the differing kinds of terrorism, including political terrorism in the Middle East, antiabortion terrorism in the United States, ecoterrorism, and religious and state terrorism throughout the world. Students will have a chance to better understand the beliefs of terrorists, conditions that produce and sustain terrorism, and the origins of political violence more generally.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 106 Race and Ethnicity in the Americas 4 Credits

How is it possible that someone who is officially considered black in the United States, can embody different racial identities throughout current Latin America? Even more, how is it possible that people consider white nowadays were not officially so in early twentieth-century US (although they were viewed as white in the Latin American context at the same time period)? This course offers a historical comparative analysis of the nature and dynamics of race between the United States and Latin America.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 110 (WGSS 110) Women's Work in Global Perspective 4 Credits

This course brings to the forefront the intersections of race, class, gender, and nation with women's employment around the world. We will examine women's paid and unpaid work in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa in an effort to understand the striking persistence of gender inequality over time and across the world. Topics of study include: work and family relations, women's domestic labor, factory work, and agribusiness. In addition, we will explore the ways in which women have organized for changes in work and in their communities in order to conceive of possibilities for the future of women's work.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 114 (ASIA 114) Social Issues in Contemporary China 4 Credits

Dramatic economic, cultural and social changes are underway in China today and have aroused much debate among social scientists, East and West. The following social issues are critical for understanding China's development trajectory: inequality and poverty; rapid demographic shifts; provision of health care services; provision of education services; and becoming an "information society." We will explore how these issues intersect with old hierarchies in China, urban-rural differences, and gender differences.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 115 A Nation of Immigrants: The American Experience 4 Credits

The course provides an introduction to contemporary immigration, conceptualizing it as a social and economic process, as well as a human experience that is simultaneously liberating and limiting. Through immigration we will analyze processes of assimilation and resistance, the construction of cultural boundaries, the development of modern nation-states, as well as the role race plays in current debates about immigrants. The course advances a critical perspective by questioning how immigration is framed in the West, particularly in the Unites States.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 116 (GS 116, JST 116) Jewish Community and Identity 4 Credits

A century ago, large Jewish communities existed throughout the world, including North Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and South America. Today, over 80% of all Jews live in North America or Israel. This course focuses on these historical changes in Jewish communities and the transformation of Jewish identities and social life in recent years, particularly in the U.S. and in Israel.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 125 Social Psychology of Small Groups 4 Credits

Theories and empirical research regarding interpersonal behavior in small groups. Classroom exercises and group simulations.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 128 (WGSS 128) Race, Gender, and Work 4 Credits

Race, Gender and Work is a class designed to help students understand racial and gender inequalities as they relate specifically to work and employment. We explore the origins and histories of inequalities, the ways in which inequalities persist and/or change today, and what steps might be taken toward creating a more equal society.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 130 Sociology of Sports 4 Credits

This course provides an encompassing explanation of the process of globalization in the twentieth century through exploring the diffusion of sports, inquiring whether the sports has been connected to multiple forms of Empires, i.e. colonialism and imperialism. To do so, we will use sports to explore social and racial tensions, analyze mechanism of resistance, re-conceptualize the boundaries of social, economic and political spheres, examine the adoption of cultural practices, as well as understanding the construction of modern nation-states.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 135 (COMM 135, JOUR 135) Human Communication 4 Credits

Processes and functions of human communication in relationships and groups.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 141 Social Deviance and Social Control 4 Credits

Analysis of deviant social systems, supporting factors maintaining them, and societal responses to deviant roles and collectivities.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 144 (AAS 144) Global Hip Hop and Social Change 4 Credits

Hip Hop has become a global phenomenon. We will analyze how and why socially Conscious Hip Hop, as a tool for social change, has expanded to Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 152 (HMS 152) Alcohol, Science, and Society 4 Credits

Alcohol use and abuse, its historical function in society, moral entrepreneurship, status struggles and conflict over alcohol. Current problems with attention to special population groups and strategies for prevention of alcohol abuse.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 155 (AAS 155, LAS 155) Afro-Latino Social Movements in Latin America & the Caribbean 4 Credits

This course focuses on Afro-Latinos who make up nearly 70% of the population of the Americas. Despite the large amount of people of African descent living in the Americas, Afro-Latinos are an understudied population who face significant amounts of racial discrimination in their countries. Who are Afro-Latinos? Where do they live? How are they challenging the racism that they face? These are questions we will tackle in this course.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 160 (HMS 160) Medicine and Society 4 Credits

Sociological perspectives on health, illness, and medical care. Focus on social epidemiology, social psychology of illness, socialization of health professionals, patient-professional relationships, medical care organization and policies.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 162 (HMS 162) AIDS and Society 4 Credits

Impact of the AIDS epidemic on individuals and on social institutions (medicine, religion, education, politics, etc.); social and health policy responses; international experience; effect of public attitudes and policy on people affected directly by AIDS.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 163 (AAS 163) Sociology of Hip Hop Culture 4 Credits

Hip Hop culture is a complex form of artistic practices reflecting and impacting the environments in which they were produced. Through readings, music and video, this class will uncover the origins of Hip Hop by examining the musical history of the Afro-diaspora in the 20th century. Further study will reveal how the young Bronx, NY underclass in the 1970s fused elements of past musical styles with their own personal and political expression that sparked a worldwide phenomenon and culture industry.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 165 Contemporary Social Problems 4 Credits

Studies of major problems facing contemporary society.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 166 (AAS 166) Wealth and Poverty in the United States 4 Credits

examines the sociology of wealth and poverty affluence and disadvantage, "rags and riches" in American Society. Focus is a critical analysis of the wealth gap, its causes, consequences, and social context. We will consider the roles of wealth and poverty in determining life chances and structuring opportunity, as well as their roles in the perpetuation of social inequality across generations. We will address contemporary debates surrounding public policy, tax laws, antipoverty programs and other reform efforts aimed at decreasing the gap between the "Haves" and the "Have-Nots.".
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 171 (REL 171) Religion And Society 4 Credits

An introduction to the sociology of religion. Covers classical and contemporary approaches to defining and studying the role of religion in society. Emphasis on understanding religious beliefs and practices in the United States, the sources and contours of religious change, and the effects of religion on individuals and society. Specific topics include religious fundamentalism, religious conversion, religious practices and authority, secularization, religion in public life, religion in social change, religious terrorism, and the ways in which religion impacts our personal health, educational attainment, and family life.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 177 (AAS 177, LAS 177) Cuba: Race, Revolution and Culture 4 Credits

This course analyzes the role of race & “culture” in the Afro Cuban struggle for equality. By focusing on the arts: particularly music, film & literature, this course will analyze the development of race during Cuba’s colonial period; the Afro Cuban challenge to the “race blind” political and cultural movements of the Cuban Republic. We will then wrap up the semester by addressing the significance of contemporary cultural movements that challenge the social issues currently facing Afro Cubans.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

SOC 302 The Sociology Of Cyberspace 4 Credits

An examination of social life on the Internet and the World Wide Web. Topics may include sociocultural and psychological aspects of communication in cyber-environments (e.g., email, chat rooms, news groups, MUDS, etc.), interpersonal relationships and group development, the nature of community, the politics of cyberspace (control and democracy), privacy and ethics, and economic dimensions. Examination of past and current case studies.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 310 (AAS 310, WGSS 310) Gender, Race and Sexuality: The Social Construction of Differences 4 Credits

Students will engage with current debates about the meaning and use of racial and sexual classification systems in society. We will examine the historical and sociological contexts in which specific theories of racial and sexual differences emerged in the U.S. We will also explore the ways in which changes in the images have implications on the role racial, gender, and sexual identity plays in our understanding of the relationship between difference and inequality.
Prerequisites: SOC 103 or SSP 103
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 313 (AAS 313) Social Movements 4 Credits

Explores the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements through both sociological theory and empirical case studies. Covers questions of what constitutes a social movement, where and when social movements arise, who joins a social movement, and how social movements are able to contribute to change. Answers to these questions highlight issues of social movement recruitment and leadership, interactions between movements and the media, the state, and the broader public, ideology, strategies and tactics, and the factors contributing to the success and failure of social movements. Course readings drawn from case studies on civil rights, women's rights, gay rights, the environment, American Indians, abortion, globalization, antiapartheid, democratization, peace, and Islamic fundamentalism. Must have completed one 100-level SSP course.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 316 (HMS 316) Social Epidemiology 4 Credits

Social epidemiology is the study of the distribution and social determinants of health and disease in human populations. This course introduces the basic principles of epidemiological study design, analysis and interpretation, covering topics such as how a disease spreads across populations and how public health interventions can help control or reduce the spread of disease. This course also reviews epidemiology as a social science by reviewing the social causes and consequences of health.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 317 Seminar in Globalization and Social Issues 4 Credits

Advanced seminar that focuses on research and discussion of specialized topics in globalization and social issues. Subjects vary by semester. Junior or senior standing and departmental permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 319 (GS 319) The Political Economy of Globalization 4 Credits

This course studies the relationship among economic, political and cultural forces in an era of globalization. Focus is on how global capitalism, the world market and local economics shape and are shaped by social, cultural and historical forces. Topics include political and cultural determinants of trade and investment; culture and the global economy; global capitalism, especially studied through the lens of culture; globalization and patterns of economic growth; cross-cultural study of consumerism; and poverty and inequality.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 321 (ES 321) Information Ecology 4 Credits

Information theory, critical social theory, and ecological principles are combined to model how information organizes human ecosystems. These concepts are applied to enviromental policy analysis using base studies.

SOC 322 (GS 322, HMS 322) Global Health Issues 4 Credits

Sociological dimensions of health, illness, and healing as they appear in different parts of the world. Focus on patterns of disease and mortality around the world; the relative importance of 'traditional' and 'modern' beliefs and practices with regard to disease and treatment in different societies; the organization of national health care systems in different countries; and the role of international organizations and social movements in promoting health.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 323 The Child In Family and Society 4 Credits

Influences such as marital discord, family violence, poverty and prejudice on the development of the child from birth through adolescence.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 325 (HIST 325, WGSS 325) History of Sexuality and the Family in the U.S. 3,4 Credits

Changing conceptions of sexuality and the role of women, men, and children in the family and society from the colonial to the post-World War II era. Emphasis on the significance of socioeconomic class and cultural background. Topics include family structure, birth control, legal constraints, marriage, divorce, and prostitution.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 326 (HIST 326) Social Class in American History 3-4 Credits

Changing role of women, minority groups, and the family during the industrial era. Development of the modern class structure and the impact of the welfare state.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 327 (JOUR 327) Mass Communication and Society 4 Credits

A review of theories and research on the relationship of mass communication to social processes. Intensive analysis of selected media products (e.g., TV news, dramas, and sitcoms; films; print; music videos, etc.).
Prerequisites: ANTH 011 or SOC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 328 (GS 328) Global Food Systems 4 Credits

Where does our food come from? How does it get to our tables? Why are there famines in some parts of the world and obesity epidemics in other parts of the world? This course will investigate these questions by focusing on food systems – the chains of social action that link food producers to food consumers. We will also explore a range of alternatives to global food systems that emphasize food democracy, security, and sustainability.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 329 (GS 329) Global Migration 4 Credits

International migration is transforming societies at both the global and national levels, and in both origin and destination areas. Why do people move? What are the consequences of these movements? We will investigate the political and economic explanations for international migration and explore how each act of migration contributes to the trans-nationalization of social relations, alters existing livelihoods, transforms economic production and social support arrangements, and recreates racial, ethnic, and national identities.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 330 (LAS 330) Society, Democracy and Revolution in Latin America 4 Credits

Latin America is a region fi lled with protest and armed guerrilla movements. Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1989, at least 5 nations in the region elected openly socialist or communist candidates, many of whom are still in power today. What is happening in Latin America? This course will focus on Latin American perspectives on democracy and social revolution. For many Latin American countries, the move to the ‘left,’ and the rejection of American capitalism is not that Latin American people embrace socialism, but rather it is a reflection of larger social dynamics at play... or is it?
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 331 (GS 331, WGSS 331) Gendered Experience of Globalization 4 Credits

Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 333 Social Psychology of Politics 4 Credits

Political behavior viewed from a psychological and social psychological perspective. Department permission.
Prerequisites: (ANTH 011 or SOC 001 or PSYC 001)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 341 (HMS 341, WGSS 341) Gender and Health 4 Credits

Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity in the U.S. and around the world. Influence of medical systems on men's and women's lives and the impact of gender-based consumer health movements on health and medical care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, masculinity and health, and gender and mental health.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 343 (HMS 343) Race, Ethnicity, and Health 4 Credits

People who belong to racial and ethnic minority groups are exposed to more health risks, have disproportionately high levels of sickness and excess deaths, and have limited access to good quality healthcare. This course provides students with theoretical and empirical insights into the intersection of race, ethnicity, and health in the U.S. Historical and contemporary patterns in U.S. demography, race relations, residential segregation, environmental justice, and social stratification will be explored in the context of health and health care.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 345 (AAS 345) Colonialism and the Black Radical Tradition 4 Credits

Karl Marx was not the only figure who developed an influential theory of social revolution. A cadre of theorists from the Global South have extensively theorized about the issues facing their particular nations, and they have developed social theories that have challenged social and global inequality.This theory-based course will focus on the anti-colonial and post-colonial thought of radical black intellectuals from the Black America, the Caribbean, and West Africa.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 351 (WGSS 351) Gender and Social Change 4 Credits

Changes in gender roles from social psychological and structural perspectives. Comparative analyses of men and women (including people of color) in the social structure; their attitudes and orientations toward work, family, education, and politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 355 Sociology Of Education 4 Credits

Examines the social organization of education as a social institution and the role of schools in society. Focus is primarily on educational processes in the United States. Topics include: IQ, curriculum, tracking, educational inequality, primary/secondary/higher education, private vs. public, informal education and social capital, effects on and of race/class/gender, schools as agents of socialization, educational policy and school reform.
Prerequisites: (ANTH 001 or SOC 001)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 364 (WGSS 364) Sociology of the Family 3,4 Credits

Sociological analysis of families in the United States, including investigations of historical and contemporary patterns. Issues addressed include parenting, combining work and family, divorce and remarriage, family policies.
Prerequisites: ANTH 011 or SOC 001 or SOC 005 or SOC 021 or PSYC 021
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 365 (WGSS 365) Inequalities at Work 4 Credits

Primary focus is on race, gender, and class as axes of disadvantage and privilege in work and employment. We will explore both theories and empirical studies of inequality as well as their social, political, and practical ramifications for the workplace. The course will be conducted seminar-style and the` class will rely heavily on student participation.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 366 Sociology of Aging 4 Credits

Residential patterns, social policies and services for the aged. Alternative political strategies, health programs, living arrangements and workplace choices considered. The changing roles of the elderly in American and other societies, and the special problems they face. Impact of changing age structure.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 370 (ES 370, GS 370) Globalization and the Environment 4 Credits

This course investigates globalization and the environment including how globalization has influenced society-nature relationships, as well as how environmental conditions influence the globalization processes. A key focus will be on the rapidly evolving global economic and political systems that characterize global development dynamics therefore resource use. Particular attention is paid to the role of multi-national corporations, international trade, and finance patterns and agreements. Questions related to consumption, population, global climate change, toxic wastes, and food production/distribution represent key themes.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 371 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Advanced work through supervised readings. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 373 Seminar In Sociology 4 Credits

Intensive consideration of selected topics in contemporary theory or research in sociology. The subject matter varies from semester to semester.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: ANTH 011 or SOC 005 or SOC 021 or PSYC 021 or SOC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 374 Social Stratification: Race, Class, Gender 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to social stratification. Examines social inequality as an organizing principle in complex societies. Explores the intersection of the "great divides" of race, class, and gender. Through readings from classical sociological theory to cutting-edge literature we embark on a critical analysis of the causes and consequences of social stratification and social mobility in the United States and in a global context.
Prerequisites: ANTH 011 or SOC 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 375 (REL 375) The Christian Right In America 4 Credits

What do we know about the Christian Right? Who are they? What do they believe? Where do they come from? Seminar explores answers to such questions through a focus on the history of the Christian Right as well as its ideologies and beliefs, the people who are a part of it, and its evolving relationship to the American political system.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 379 Race And Class In America 4 Credits

This course focuses on the ways in which race and class intersect in the social, economic, and political structures of American society. Through sociological literature, fiction, nonfiction, film, and other media we will explore the place of race and class in American society. We will examine how race and class operate on a personal, "micro" level, while at the same time operating on a large scale, "macro" level.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 389 Honors Project 1-6 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

SOC 391 Evaluation Research 3 Credits

Application of social research methods of evaluation of the effectiveness of social programs. Measurement, research design, criteria of effectiveness and decision making. Consent of department chair.
Prerequisites: SR 111
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 393 Supervised Research 1-4 Credits

Conducting sociological or social psychological research under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 395 Internship 1-4 Credits

Supervised experience involving nonpaid work in a setting relevant to sociology/social psychology. for credit. Open only to department majors.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 399 Senior Thesis 2-4 Credits

Research during senior year culminating in senior thesis. Required for sociology/social psychology majors seeking departmental honors. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 401 Classical Social Theory 3 Credits

Explores influential sociological theory, the differences among classical theoretical traditions, the main strengths and weaknesses of such traditions. Emphasis is placed on understanding the uses of theory in research, and the implications of theoretical models when applied to contemporary research and problems.

SOC 402 Sociology of Cyberspace 3 Credits

The course focus is on case-based discussion in the social psychology and sociology of the Internet and the World Wide Web. Questions of what it means to be an individual online, how relationships develop, the nature of groups, democracy and power, and education are considered.

SOC 404 (ES 404) Socio-cultural Foundations of Environmental Policy Design 3 Credits

This course is based on the premise that social and ecological sustainability require new policy approaches. Drawing on social, organizational, and behavioral theory, students will learn techniques for analyzing and critiquing existing environmental policies and designing more effective policies. Case studies highlight how cultural values, social norms, public opinion and politics shape policies and their outcomes. We examine the entire policy process from how environmental problems are defined, to how organizations implement policies and how policies are evaluated.

SOC 410 Statistics for Sociological Inquiry 3 Credits

Principles of statistical inference including hypothesis testing and analysis of variance. Covers univariate and multivariate techniques, including probability, correlation, test statistics, and regression. Emphasis is on the choice of proper approaches to answer research questions and the interpretation of analysis results.

SOC 411 Advanced Research Methods, Part I: Quantitative 3 Credits

Study of quantitative methods of data collection and analysis, measurement and research design issues at an advanced level.
Prerequisites: SOAN 111

SOC 412 Adv Research Methods, Part II, Qualitative 3 Credits

Study of qualitative methods of data collection and analysis, measurement and research design issues at an advanced level.

SOC 413 Research Practicum 3-6 Credits

Supervised research, either with a faculty member or in a community agency, designed to apply research skills to a particular problem as defined by the faculty member or agency in collaboration with the student and supervising instructor. Final paper should demonstrate theoretical understanding, proper application of methodology and data analysis, and results of the project.

SOC 415 Case Studies Of Social Control 3 Credits

Social control leads to social order and also generates social deviance. The processes involved in this dual production are found in the formal institutions of society and in the informal patterns of interaction within groups. Macro and micro level approaches are explored, especially in the drug and alcohol area.

SOC 416 Social Epidemiology 3 Credits

Social epidemiology is the study of the distribution and social determinants of health and disease in human populations. This course introduces the basic principles of epidemiological study design, analysis and interpretation, covering topics such as how a disease spreads across populations and how public health interventions can help control or reduce the spread of disease. This course also reviews epidemiology as a social science by reviewing the social causes and consequences of health.

SOC 418 (WGSS 418) Gendered Experience of Globalization 3 Credits

Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.

SOC 419 Global Food Systems 3 Credits

Where does our food come from? How does it get to our tables? Why are there famines in some parts of the world and obesity epidemics in other parts of the world? This course will investigate these questions by focusing on food systems – the chains of social action that link food producers to food consumers. We will also explore a range of alternatives to global food systems that emphasize food democracy, security, and sustainability.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 420 Global Migration 3 Credits

International migration is transforming societies at both the global and national levels, and in both origin and destination areas. Why do people move? What are the consequences of these movements? We will investigate the political and economic explanations for international migration and explore how each act of migration contributes to the trans-nationalization of social relations, alters existing livelihoods, transforms economic production and social support arrangements, and recreates racial, ethnic, and national identities.

SOC 421 (ES 421) Information Ecology 3 Credits

Information theory, critical social theory, and ecological principles are combined to model how information organizes human ecosystems. These concepts are applied to environmental policy analysis using case studies.

SOC 438 Sociology of the Body 3 Credits

This course examines the body not as a biological entity but as a product of complex social forces. We will study how our bodies are connected to social structures, such as class, gender and race. In doing so, students will realize how our bodies are simultaneously expressions of the self as well as powerful social factors. To explore these topics we will analyze the work of thinkers such as Marx, Elias, Goffman, Foucault, Bourdieu, and Butler.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 441 (WGSS 441) Gender and Health 3 Credits

Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity in the US and around the world. Influence of medical systems on men's and women's lives and the impact of gender-based consumer health movements on health and medical care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, masculinity and health, and gender and mental health.

SOC 443 Race, Ethnicity, and Health 3 Credits

People who belong to racial and ethnic minority groups are exposed to more health risks, have disproportionately high levels of sickness and excess deaths, and have limited access to good quality healthcare. This course provides students with theoretical and empirical insights into the intersection of race, ethnicity, and health in the U.S. Historical and contemporary patterns in U.S. demography, race relations, residential segregation, environmental justice, and social stratification will be explored in the context of health and health care.

SOC 454 Urban Education: Inequality and Public Policy 1-4 Credits

Social inequality is found throughout American Society but problems of inequality related to education have perhaps received more attention than those of any other contemporary social institution. Researchers, scholars, journalists, social critics, and observers have studied, written, and talked about educational inequality to an enormous extent. Social service organizations, activists, policymakers, legal professionals, and government officials have focused massive reform efforts and political agendas to tackle inequality in education. Many sociologists have long viewed education not just as an arena of inequality but as the solution to the widespread inequalities they see reflected in society. Urban education has been an especially complex and controversial subject of scrutiny in recent scholarly and popular debates. This course will focus with a sociological perspective on urban education, inequality, and public policy in the contemporary United States. The first portion of the course examines research and literature relevant to the contemporary social problems of urban education and inequality. The second portion of the course will explore the role of public policy in perpetuating educational inequality, and as a potentially promising solution to it.

SOC 461 Seminar In Sociology 1-4 Credits

Topics vary.

SOC 465 (WGSS 465) Inequalities at Work 3 Credits

Primary focus is on race, gender, and class as axes of disadvantage and privilege in work and employment. We will explore both theories and empirical studies of inequality as well as their social, political, and practical ramifications for the workplace.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

SOC 471 Special Topics 1-3 Credits

Intensive study in an area of sociology that is appropriate to the interests and needs of staff and students.

SOC 472 Special Topics 1-3 Credits

Continuation of SSP 471.

SOC 473 Social Basis Of Human Behavior 3 Credits

Development of human behavior from a social psychological perspective. Emphasis placed on the impact of society upon school-age children and adolescents.

SOC 476 Issues In Health Policy Analysis 3 Credits

Sociological analyses of health care and health care policy issues of current concern in American and other societies. Application of analytic frameworks to several majors issues such as organization and financing of services, effects of aging populations on needs, impact of new diseases and of new technologies. Students will analyze selected health care problems faced by local communities.

SOC 490 Master's Thesis 1-6 Credits

Professors. John B. Gatewood, PhD (University of Illinois Urbana); Judith N. Lasker, PhD (Harvard University); David B. Small, PhD (University of Cambridge); Nicola B. Tannenbaum, PhD (Iowa State University); Cameron Braxton Wesson, PhD (University of Illinois Urbana)

Associate Professors. David Casagrande, PhD (University Georgia Athens); Heather Beth Johnson, PhD (Northeastern University); Jacqueline Krasas, PhD (University of Southern California); Ziad Munson, PhD (Harvard University); Bruce Whitehouse, PhD (Brown University); Yuping Zhang, PhD (University of Pennsylvania)

Assistant Professors. Sirry Mbong Alang, PhD (University of Minnesota); Kelly F. Austin, PhD (North Carolina State University); Hugo Ricardo Ceron Anaya, PhD (University of Essex); Danielle J. Lindemann, PhD (Columbia University)

Professor Of Practice. Sarah Eliza Stanlick Kimball, PhD (Lehigh University)

Emeriti. Roy C. Herrenkohl, Jr., PhD (New York University); James R. McIntosh, PhD (Syracuse University); Robert E. Rosenwein, PhD (University of Michigan Ann Arbor); Robert C. Williamson, PhD (University of Southern California)