2019-20 Catalog

Ethics

Program Director: Robin S. Dillon, Ph.D.

Email:  rsd2@lehigh.edu   |   Phone: 610-758-3776

Website:  www.ethicscenter.cas2.lehigh.edu

Supported by the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs 610-758-3996; incasip@lehigh.edu
Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive


The interdisciplinary academic Center for Ethics promotes rigorous inquiry into, probing reflection on, and responsible engagement with the ethical dimensions of life from the personal to the global.

Ethics has to do with issues of action, character, and governing values, with questions about right and wrong, good and evil, worthiness and unworthiness, justice and injustice, with matters of individual and collective responsibility, respect and discrimination, war and peace, and with the norms, habits, and systems that make the persons we are, the lives we live, and the societies in which we live together, better or worse. Ultimately, ethics concerns how we ought to live, individually and collectively. Ethical concepts, issues, questions, norms, and systems can be studied philosophically, psychologically, sociologically, anthropologically, historically, politically; ethical inquiry engages the natural and applied sciences and engineering and addresses concerns in economics and business; ethical questions are explored in religion and literature and through artistic expression.

The Center's organizing perspective is that there is no aspect of human beings, no space in human lives, that does not have ethical dimensions—our intrapersonal lives, our interpersonal relations, as well as the educational, professional, familial, social, cultural, religious, artistic, political, economic, environmental, scientific, and global dimensions of our lives together. The ethics domain thus encompasses all aspects of Lehigh University.

For more information, visit our web site. 

ETHICS MINOR

The most important personal, professional, and social questions cannot be resolved through empirical research or technological innovation alone; they require disciplined engagement with the fundamental values at stake in private and public life. Lehigh’s Minor in Ethics prepares students for this engagement, enabling them to think carefully and critically about a wide variety of controversial issues, from the use of military drones and self-driving cars to the protection of our environment and personal data; from issues of human well-being and justice (e.g. in healthcare, immigration, and the economy) to the social problems of racism, sexism, and Islamophobia. The ethical knowledge and skills students develop in Lehigh’s Minor in Ethics are personally enriching and directly contribute to good decision-making in professional and civic life.

The interdisciplinary Minor in Ethics requires a core course that provides students with a robust foundation and critical reasoning tools for identifying and addressing ethical issues and challenges. Elective courses enable student to apply the skills of ethical inquiry and reasoning to specific issues arising in a wide variety of areas and professional fields (e.g. legal, medical, business).

The minor in Ethics consists of 16 credits, including a core course and electives. At least one course must be at the 200-level or above. A maximum of 4 credits of independent study can count for the minor. Senior theses and honors and capstone courses or projects may be eligible.Each semester a complete list of courses eligible for the Ethics minor can be found on the Center for Ethics website  or in the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs, Williams Hall 101.  Students considering minoring in Ethics should consult with the Director of the Center for Ethics in the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs (incasip@lehigh.edu).

Required core course (select one)4
Ethics
ETH/REL/PHIL 003
Electives (select three)11-12
ETH/REL 002
ETH/PHIL 005
Conduct and Character: An Introduction to Philosophy
Religion and Ecological Crisis
Introduction to Political Thought
Environmental Values and Ethics
Bioethics
Race, Racism, and Philosophy
Values and Ethics of Community-Engaged Research
ETH/REL 125
Social & Political Philosophy
Ancient Philosophy
ETH/REL 149
The Holocaust: History and Meaning
Independent Reading and Research
Philosophy of Economics
Special Topics in Ethics
ETH/PHIL 205
ETH/PHIL 206
ETH/REL/HMS 226
Computers, the Internet, and Society
Buddhism and Ecology
Independent Reading and Research
Special Topics in Ethics
The Psychology of Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination
Health and Environmental Controversies
The Psychology of Morality
The Psychology of Evil
Social Justice and Social Change
History of Fascism
Environmental Justice: From Theory to Practice
Politics Of Authenticity
Development of Good and Evil
Environmental Case Studies
Special Topics in Ethics
Total Credits15-16

Courses

ETH 002 (HMS 002, REL 002) Death and Dying: Religious and Ethical Perspectives 4 Credits

Introduces students to the study of religion, world religious traditions and ethics through an exploration of death and dying. Rituals, practices and texts focused on death provide the basis for comparative study of Asian and Western religious approaches to the meaning and mystery of death as it confronts individuals and communities. Attention will also be given to moral justification for deaths brought about by human actions (i.e., killings). Specific issues include suicide, war deaths, abortion, euthanasia and state-sponsored execution.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 003 (PHIL 003, REL 003) Global Religion, Global Ethics 4 Credits

Introduction to philosophical and religious modes of moral thinking, with attention given to ethical issues as they arise cross-culturally in and through religious traditions. The course will reference the United Nations Millennium Goals to consider family life and the role of women, social justice, the environment, and ethical ideals. Particular focus varies but may include one or more of the following: abortion and reproductive health, the death penalty, religiously motivated violence, and problems of personal disorder (heavy drinking, anorexia, vengeance).
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 005 (PHIL 005) Contemporary Moral Problems: An Introduction to Philosophy 4 Credits

An examination of contemporary issues that raise questions about right and wrong, good and bad, both for individuals and for social policy, using the methods, theories, and concepts of moral philosophy. Course not open to seniors.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 006 (PHIL 006) Conduct and Character: An Introduction to Philosophy 4 Credits

How should we live our lives? How should we act? What kinds of persons should we be? What should we care about? These are among the central questions of philosophy because they are among the most central questions of human existence. This explores answers that have been proposed by thinkers throughout history and across cultures. Course not open to seniors.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 105 (PHIL 105) Ethics 4 Credits

Examination of right and wrong, good and bad, from classic sources such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche.

ETH 116 (HMS 116, PHIL 116, REL 116) Bioethics 4 Credits

Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. Topics include: confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, medical research and experimentation, genetics, and the distribution of health care.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 120 (HMS 120, SOAN 120) Values and Ethics of Community-Engaged Research 4 Credits

The many dimensions of community-engaged research and learning are explored, with special attention to ethical practices, values, research methods, and critical reflection. Experiential and service aspects of the course provide opportunities for students to build skills for social and community change, as well as build capacity for research and critical inquiry.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

ETH 149 (REL 149) Modern Islamic Ethics 4 Credits

This course will focus on developments in Islamic thinking and ethics that emerge from the modern encounter between Muslim societies and the West. We will discuss Islamic modernism and fundamentalism through short primary texts from a variety of modern Muslim thinkers.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 171 Independent Reading and Research 1-4 Credits

Independent study of selected topic designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of the Center for Ethics Program faculty. May be repeated for elective credit. Consent of program director required. Repeat status: May be repeated.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ETH 191 Special Topics in Ethics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be crosslisted with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ETH 205 (PHIL 205) Contemporary Ethics 4 Credits

Examination of significant questions addressed by contemporary moral philosophers. Topics vary, but might include: What is a good person? What kind of life is worth living? What moral issues are raised by gender, race, and class? Is morality relative or absolute? Is morality all that important?
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 206 (PHIL 206) Figures/Themes in Ethics 4 Credits

This semester course will involve in-depth focus on a major figure in ethics (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, etc.) or on a theme such as relativism, free will, the intersection of religion and ethics, or war.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 226 (HMS 226, REL 226) From Black Death to AIDS:Plague,Pandemic,Ethics and Religion 4 Credits

An investigation into the way religion and morality shape interpretations of plague and pandemics. Three specific pandemics are examined: the bubonic plague of the 14th century, the 1918 influenza pandemic, and the current global AIDS crisis. Moral issues provoked by institutional, political and social responses to pandemic disease are also considered.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 254 (ASIA 254, ES 254, REL 254) Buddhism and Ecology 4 Credits

Buddhism’s intellectual, ethical, and spiritual resources are reexamined in light of contemporary environmental problems. Is Buddhism the most green of the major world religions? What are the moral implications of actions that affect the environment?
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ETH 271 Independent Reading and Research 1-4 Credits

Independent study of selected topics designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of the Center for Ethics Program faculty. May be repeated for elective credit. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ETH 291 Special Topics in Ethics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be crosslisted with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ETH 391 Special Topics in Ethics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be crosslisted with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.