2017-18 Catalog

Modern Languages and Literatures

Knowledge of other languages opens the door to other cultures, traditions, and perspectives on the world, and promotes deeper insight into one’s own language and culture. Proficiency in modern languages is indispensable in a broad range of professions such as journalism, government, international affairs, law, the armed forces, and business. A bachelor of arts degree with a major in languages provides excellent preparation for professional careers in law, business, and the media. Language study is required for graduate study in many disciplines, as well as for research in science and technology. International experience is personally enriching and enhances career prospects.

Languages offered

Lehigh offers Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish. Courses include oral, reading, and writing skills, literature, film, culture, civilization, and professional areas such as business and health careers. A number of literature and culture courses are given in English, but most offerings stress classroom use of the target language.

Language requirements

The Global Studies major, the Joint IR/MLL major, as well as the honors major in international relations require language study. The college scholar program in the College of Arts and Sciences, the major in Asian Studies, the minors in Latin American Studies, and Asian Studies require language study. Students taking the B.A. in international relations are expected to study a language. Some doctoral programs also require competence in a language other than English, usually assessed by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

Advising

Major Programs

The department offers major programs in Chinese, French and Francophone Studies, German, Spanish and Hispanic Studies, and Joint IR/MLL. The candidate for the major is expected to demonstrate adequate written and oral command of the language, as well as knowledge of its literature and culture. A period of study abroad is strongly recommended.

Double majors and Arts-Engineering majors including a language component are well-received by employers. Studies in the two areas are carefully coordinated by major advisers.

Major in Chinese

The major in Chinese will require 36 credits: a minimum of 24 credits in courses taught in Chinese, including 8 credits at the 200 or 300 level of Chinese language and literature (marked CHIN). Courses offered in English in MLL on Chinese literature and history may be included in the major and a maximum of two courses outside of MLL in the Asian Studies Program that are concerned specifically with China, such as those available in International Relations, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, etc., by approval of the major adviser. Majors in Chinese are strongly encouraged to study abroad in a Chinese speaking country.

Major in German

The major in German requires 32 credits in German language, literature, and culture beyond German 12. This includes all German courses that are 100 level and above, and emphasis should be on 200 and 300 level courses. One of these courses may be taken in English when the class is taught by a German faculty member and when the writing assignments are completed in German. For specific course requirements, see the language major adviser.

Majors in German are strongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program in a German speaking country for the equivalent of one semester or more.  A maximum of 16 credits of study abroad (24 for the honors major) may be transferred toward the major, with a maximum of 8 credits for summer, 12 credits for a semester, and 16 credits for a year of study abroad (24 for the honors major).  In order to have credits from foreign institutions count toward their major, students must obtain approval from the German major adviser prior to their departure.

Requirements for the Honors Major in German (40 credits)

Requirements are the same as for the regular major in German, plus 8 additional hours of advanced literature, to be completed as course work or with an honors thesis of a comprehensive format, and maintenance of a 3.20 average in the major.

Major in French and Francophone Studies

Core Courses
FREN 143Advanced Written French4
FREN 144Advanced Oral French4
One of the following3-4
Contemporary France
Introduction to the Francophone World
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
Advanced course work16
or four courses (200 or 300 level), with at least three courses at the 300 level. One of these courses may be taken in English when taught by a French faculty member.
Collateral requisites6-8
from a list of approved courses taken in other programs and departments. These courses must be approved by the French major adviser.

Majors in French and Francophone Studies are strongly encouraged to participate in a study program in a French-speaking part of the world for the equivalent of one semester or more. Up to 12 credits for courses taken during one semester abroad (16 credits during one year) may count toward the major. In order to have credits from foreign institutions count toward their major, students must obtain approval from the French major adviser prior to their departure.

Requirements for the Departmental Honors Major (40 credits):

Requirements as for the major, plus 8 additional hour of advanced literature (honors thesis of a comprehensive type) and maintenance of a 3.20 average in the major.

Major in Japanese

The major in Japanese Studies requires 35 credits: a minimum of 23 credits in Japanese languages beyond JPNS 002; 3 credits from Study Abroad in Japan, and a minimum of 9 credits (or 3 courses) in Japanese literature and culture courses offered in English in MLL (electives). For elective courses, a maximum of two courses can be taken outside of MLL, either from study-abroad or the list of Japanese-related courses offered in the Asian Studies program. If a student is financially or academically unable to fulfill the study abroad requirement, other options could be negotiated with an advisor’s approval. 

Requirements:

        1. Japanese language courses (see recommended sequence below) = 23 credits

               2. Study Abroad (3) = 3 credits

If a student is financially or academically unable to fulfill this requirement, other options could be negotiated with an advisor’s approval.

               3. Electives:  Courses on Japan taught in English. 3 courses = Minimum of 9 credits

Electives can include credits from study abroad. Maximum of two courses offered outside of MLL are allowed. The following courses in the Asian Studies program cover topics related to Japan:

ASIA 010; ASIA 012; ASIA 061; ASIA 068; ASIA 119; ASIA 127; ASIA 140; ASIA 142; ASIA 162; ASIA 164; ASIA 170; ASIA192; ASIA 193; ASIA 337; ASIA 340

Total: 35 credits

Students must take the Elementary Japanese I (JPNS001) in the first semester upon arrival at Lehigh unless they have previously studied the Japanese language equivalent to JPNS 1 and 2. The following is the recommended semester-by-semester roster.

Semester 1: JPNS 001 (prerequisite)

Semester 2: JPNS 002 (Prerequisite)

Semester 3: JPNS 011, One course in MLL/Asia

Semester 4: JPNS 012, One Course in MLL/Asia

Semester 5: JPNS 131&151, One course in MLL/Asia  OR Study Abroad

Semester 6: JPNS 132&152,

Semester 7: JPNS 231

Semester 8: JPNS 232, JPNS 290 (Major Paper)

Major in Spanish and Hispanic Studies

Core Courses12
SPAN 141Advanced Spanish Grammar4
SPAN 151Cultural Evolution Spain4
SPAN 152Cultural Evolution of Latin America4
Advanced course work12
or three courses at the 300 level.
Electives8
at the 100 or 200 level.
Collateral requisites6-8
from a list of approved courses taken in other programs and departments. These courses must be approved by the Spanish major adviser.

Majors in Spanish and Hispanic Studies are strongly encouraged to participate in a study program in a Spanish-speaking country for the equivalent of one semester or more. Up to 12 credits for courses taken during one semester abroad (16 credits during one year) may count toward the major. In order to have credits from foreign institutions count toward their major, students must obtain approval from the Spanish major adviser prior to their departure.

Requirements for the Departmental Honors Major (40 credits)

Requirements as for the major, plus 8 additional hours of advanced literature (honors thesis of a comprehensive type) and maintenance of a 3.20 average in the major.

Joint International Relations/Modern Languages and Literatures Major

For more information please visit  the joint IR/MLL Major.

Minor programs

The department offers minor programs in Chinese, French, German,  International Film, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish, and coordinates these studies with a student’s major requirements in any college.

Requirements for the Minor

French, German, Spanish: Sixteen credit hours are required above Intermediate II; one or two courses at the 200 level, one or two courses at the 300 level.

Chinese, Japanese, Russian: A minimum of 16 credit hours.

See end of department section for International Film.

A maximum of 8 credits may be transferred for the minor.

Related programs

These are available in Asian Studies, Global Studies, Jewish Studies, Latin American Studies, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Students are urged to take elective courses on related subjects, either within or outside the department, as approved by their adviser.

Preliminary Courses

These may be replaced by other courses when a student qualifies for advanced standing.

Elementary I (4) Intermediate I (4)

Elementary II (4) Intermediate II (4)

Advanced courses

Except where otherwise noted, 200 or 300-level courses are open to students having completed eight credit hours beyond Intermediate II. Exceptions require the consent of the instructor.

Language of instruction

All courses are taught in the target language except MLL courses listed under “International Cultures and Literatures Taught in English.” Students thereby become accustomed to considering the language as an active means of communication and not solely as an object of study.

Language placement

Students are normally placed in language courses on the basis of years of a language taken in high school, CEEB Achievement Test score, or the departmental equivalent (instructor’s test, interview, or questionnaire). Students may change levels within a language during the first two weeks of class. Students who consider themselves capable of higher-level performance may apply to the instructor during the first two weeks of the semester for more advanced placement. They may also be allowed by the department chair to be admitted for credit to a lower-level language course after consultation with the instructor. Students who have had three years or more of a language in high school and drop to first-semester level will not receive credit for the course. No course under 100 level may be taken for credit once a higher course has been passed.

Courses in English

The department offers elective courses in English on literary, cultural, and social subjects listed under “International Culture and Literature Taught in English."

These courses may, in most cases, be taken to fulfill preliminary distribution requirements. One of these courses may be included in the major.

 Minor in International Film

Description

The minor in International Film affords students the opportunity to examine a wide cross-section of world cinema. It is designed to provide a critical understanding of historical trends and current issues in film across various regions of the world. Covering national cinemas from Asia, Europe, and Latin America, course offerings will allow students to explore diverse approaches to film that are rooted in the history, culture, and society of different countries in each region.

The minor consists of 16 credits. All students must take a required core course (MLL 100), and the remaining courses are to be chosen from the list of electives below, in consultation with the minor advisor. (One course may be taken outside of the MLL department with the minor advisor’s approval.)

Core course
MLL 100Introduction to International Film4
Elective courses
MLL/ASIA/WGSS/GCP 073Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China4
FREN 322Contemporary French Films4
GERM/GCP/MLL 231New German Cinema4
SPAN 265Spanish and Latin American Cinema4

Study Abroad and Travel Grants

The department encourages students of languages to spend a summer, a semester, or a full year on an approved program of study abroad. Exchange agreements with partner institutions are continually being developed. The department offers a limited number of travel grants for study abroad to qualified students. Applications should be submitted by the first week of November for the spring and summer semesters and by the first week of April for summer and fall. Applications for Study Abroad in Asia are also reviewed by the Asian Studies faculty when funds are available. For credit, transfer students must consult in advance with their major adviser, language adviser, other appropriate departments, the Office of International Education, and when appropriate, the Office of Financial Aid.

Lehigh offers summer programs through the Lehigh in Shanghai Internship Program. The Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC) offers programs in international locations for eight credits each. A faculty member acting as program director accompanies the students. Courses are taught at intermediate and advanced levels by qualified instructors from host institutions. Summer programs sponsored by the Lehigh-LVAIC Center for Jewish Studies include Hebrew in Israel. Credits are fully transferable under normal LVAIC cross-registration procedures. Interested students should consult with the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Williams Hall.

These courses are offered by Lehigh or under the Cooperation agreement with the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges. Summer or semester study abroad at approved programs may be incorporated into language majors and minors with the permission of the appropriate advisor to a maximum of 16 credits toward the major and eight credits toward the minor.

International Cultures and Literatures Taught in English

These courses on international cultures and comparative topics carry no prerequisites; knowledge of the language is not required.

Language majors may count one MLL course taught in English for credit toward a major requirement. Interested students should consult their language major advisors. For course descriptions, see under each language area below.

Hebrew

The department offers courses both separately and in the context of the Jewish studies minor.

Modern Hebrew is taught in the Department of Modern Languages and Literature. Biblical Hebrew is taught in the Department of Religion Studies.

Arabic Courses

ARAB 001 Elementary Arabic I 4 Credits

The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 002 Elementary Arabic II 4 Credits

Continuation of ARAB 001. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills and use of the language. Students develop ability to communicate with native speakers on a variety of everyday topics; introductions, descriptions of people and things, disseminating information, stating preferences, describing locations, etc. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand authentic materials on familiar topics, as well as recognize and understand various grammatical rules and their application in context, and expand their cultural awareness.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 011 Intermediate Arabic I 4 Credits

Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films. Grammar is presented in context. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials. Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions.
Prerequisites: ARAB 002
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 012 Intermediate Arabic II 4 Credits

Enhancement of communication skills, proficiency, competence, and use of the language. Students will enhance and develop their ability to understand the spoken word and to converse on a variety of topics; discuss, narrate, and read authentic materials that cover a variety of issues and topics; e.g., educational, cultural, and factual; write short paragraphs; recognize and use grammatical rules in context; and expand cultural awareness through class discussion and reading materials. Frequently taught in the target language to emphasize and reinforce classroom use. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the upper intermediate level.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 099 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ARAB 190 Special Topics I 1-4 Credits

Develop communication skills, emphasize and reinforce classroom use. Translate articles from newspapers, write short stories, and converse on a variety of topics. Directed study, reading, and writing. Periodic consultations and reports.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 191 Special Topics II 1-4 Credits

Continuation of ARAB 190. Literary and linguistic topics not covered in regular classes.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 231 Third Year Arabic I 4 Credits

Enhance fluency, particularly conversational Arabic. Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language. Dialogue, reading, and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language. Immersion in overall increase in fluency. Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e., newspaper, magazine).
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 232 Third Year Arabic II 4 Credits

Continuation of Third Year Arabic I. Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language. Dialogue, reading, and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language. Immersion in overall increase in fluency. Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e., newspaper, magazine).
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

ARAB 341 Fourth Year Arabic I 4 Credits

Enhance fluency, particularly conversational and written Arabic. Reading and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, and promote mastery of the language. Immersion and overall increase in fluency. Students will be expected to communicate with classmates and the instructor in Arabic and to make presentations in Arabic pertaining to current events. Increased use of Arabic during classroom instruction. Students expected to come prepared to present something that utilizes the language: poems, personal stories or experiences, current event articles etc.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

ARAB 342 Fourth Year Arabic II 4 Credits

Continuation of Fourth Year Arabic I. Enhance fluency, particularly conversational and written Arabic. Emphasis on reading and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, promote mastery of the language. Immersion and overall increase in fluency. Students will be expected to communicate with classmates and the instructor in Arabic and to make presentations in Arabic pertaining to current events. Increased use of Arabic during classroom instruction. Students expected to come prepared to present something that utilizes the language: poems, personal stories or experiences, current event articles etc.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

Chinese Courses

CHIN 001 Beginning Chinese Reading and Writing I 2 Credits

Introduction to the Chinese writing system and beginning character acquisition; reading practice with pinyin transcription system. (Fall) Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 002 Beginning Chinese Reading and Writing II 2 Credits

Continuation of CHIN 001: continued character acquisition, reading practice in pinyin and simple character texts. Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 003 Beginning Spoken Chinese I 2 Credits

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 004 Beginning Spoken Chinese II 2 Credits

Continuation of CHIN 003: further practice with text based dialogues in modern colloquial Chinese; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 011 Intermediate Chinese Reading and Writing I 2 Credits

Continued focus on vocabulary/character acquisition and text-based reading and writing exercises using Chinese characters. Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 012 Intermediate Chinese Reading and Writing II 2 Credits

Continuation of CHIN 011: vocabulary/character acquisition and text-based reading and writing exercises using Chinese characters. Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 013 Intermediate Spoken Chinese I 2 Credits

Further development of communicative skills in Chinese using situational dialogues and class discussion; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 014 Intermed Spoken Chinese II 2 Credits

Continuation of CHIN 013: further development of communicative skills in Chinese using situational dialogues and class discussion; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 021 Survival Chinese 2 Credits

A brief introduction to the language and culture. Focus on speaking and listening skills. Lessons based on practical situations for living or traveling in China.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 091 Chinese Language & Culture Abroad I 1-8 Credits

Introductory intensive study of conversation in the language of the country; reading, development of writing skills and selected aspects of the culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 092 Chinese Language and Culture Abroad I (Part TWO) 3 Credits

Intensive study of conversation in Chinese, rapid review of the basic grammar, reading and analysis of basic interactive dialogues, development of writing skills, familiarity with select aspects of the culture.
Prerequisites: CHIN 021
Can be taken Concurrently: CHIN 021

CHIN 111 Advanced Chinese Reading & Writing I 2 Credits

Reading, translation, and writing practice using text-based exercises, short stories, essays, and other selected materials. Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 112 Advanced Chinese Reading & Writing II 2 Credits

Continuation of CHIN 111: reading, translation, writing exercises using text-based exercises, short stories, essays, and other selected materials. Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 113 Advanced Spoken Chinese I 2 Credits

Topical discussions and oral presentations in Chinese. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 114 Advanced Spoken Chinese II 2 Credits

Continuation of CHIN 113: topical discussions and oral presentations in Chinese. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken .
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 119 Writing Skills in Chinese 2 Credits

Students above the intermediate level of spoken and written Chinese work individually with the instructor on topics of their own choice.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 122 Intermediate Business Chinese 2 Credits

Introduction to Chinese business environment and business terminology. Emphasis on reading comprehension and translation.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 134 Chinese Short Stories 2 Credits

Supplementary reading designed for students at the intermediate level Chinese. Focus on improved reading and speaking proficiency. Reading materials will strengthen understanding of both contemporary and historical Chinese culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 191 Chinese Language & Culture Abroad II 1-8 Credits

Intensive study of conversation in the language of the country; rapid review of basic grammar, the reading and analysis of moderately difficult texts, development of rudimentary writing skills, supplemented study of selected aspects of contemporary civilization. Consent of department required. Must have proficiency examination in the target country.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 251 Chinese Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Materials not covered in regular courses. Students help design the course.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 252 Advanced Business Chinese 2 Credits

Directed readings on the Chinese business environment and business terminology. Emphasis on reading comprehension and translation.
Prerequisites: CHIN 112 or CHIN 114
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 253 Chinese Fiction 2 Credits

Students read modern Chinese short stories or a novel. Emphasis on reading comprehension and translation.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: CHIN 112 or CHIN 114
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 254 Intensive Chinese Conversation 2 Credits

Conversational practice based on topical readings. For advanced speakers only.
Prerequisites: CHIN 112 or CHIN 114
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 255 Newspaper Readings In Chinese 2 Credits

Newspaper readings in Chinese. Emphasis on reading comprehension and translation.
Prerequisites: CHIN 112 or CHIN 114
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 291 Chinese Language & Culture Abroad III 1-8 Credits

Intensive practice of speaking and writing in the language of the country aimed at providing the student with extensive proficiency of expression and the ability to discriminate linguistic usage. Idiomatic expressions and an introduction to stylistics. Reading and analysis of more difficult texts, supplemented by in-depth study of selected aspects of contemporary civilization. Consent of department required. Must have proficiency examination in the target country.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CHIN 371 Advanced Readings in Chinese 1-4 Credits

Directed study of an author, genre, or period not covered in regular courses. Can be combined with select Asian Studies courses to include relevant readings in English. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CHIN 384 Research in Chinese Language and Culture Abroad 1-8 Credits

For students with advanced language skills to do research or work abroad in Chinese (above the third year level). Independent Study.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

French Courses

FREN 001 Elementary French I 4 Credits

Multimedia approach to the study of French. Introduction to French conversation, grammar, and culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 002 Elementary French II 4 Credits

Continuation of FREN 001.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 011 Intermediate French I 4 Credits

Further acquisition of the fundamentals of French conversation, writing, and culture. Multimedia approach.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 012 Intermediate French II 0,4 Credits

Continuation of FREN 011.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 099 French Special Topics 1-6 Credits

FREN 133 (AAS 133, HIST 133, LAS 133, MLL 133, POLS 133) Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity 3-4 Credits

History, culture, and politics of the French Caribbean island of Martinique, from its position as a key site of the 18th century Atlantic World economy to becoming an official French department and outpost of the European Union. Interdisciplinary perspectives on the complex nature of social identity, historical memory and impact of globalization. No French is required. Offered during winter inter-term through Lehigh Study Abroad.

FREN 143 Advanced Written French 4 Credits

Intensive practice in written French and introduction to literary criticism.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 144 Advanced Oral French 4 Credits

Emphasis on comprehension and oral performance of the French language. Student acquires confidence in speaking French through discussions of current issues, articles, novels, movies, and other topics. Required for French majors.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 152 Introduction to Literary Analysis 4 Credits

Exposure to representative French and Francophone works from the Middle Ages to the Twenty-First Century offering various critical strategies needed to read and interpret a literary text.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 199 French Special Topics 1-6 Credits

FREN 237 Introduction to the Francophone World 4 Credits

Introduction to the Francophone world through a series of texts, films, articles, etc. from Francophone Europe, North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, Canada, Vietnam, and the Caribbean. Students will become acquainted with Francophone cultures and literatures while developing their interpretative and writing skills. In French.

FREN 242 The Harem in French and Francophone Literature and Film 4 Credits

Explore representations of this forbidden and secret feminine space, the harem, starting with French theater from the 17th century all the way to 20th-21st century Francophone North African novels and film. We will attempt a comparative study between the French and Francophone traditions and will be looking at the harem as a visual as well as textual feminine space from which narratives emerge and the extent to which they constitute a counter-discourse that questions dominant power structures.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 251 Postcolonizing France: North African Immigration 4 Credits

Depictions of North African immigrants (legal or illegal) and French citizens of North African descent in postcolonial France in novels, film, and Rap music. Explore key concepts such as hospitality, minority ethnic settlement, multiculturalism, nationality and citizenship, racism, extreme-right politics, and anti-discrimination policy, and attempt to see how North African postcolonial identities are articulated in relation to perceptions of French national identity, republican values, universalism, etc.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 255 Introduction to the Francophone World 4 Credits

Introduction to the Francophone world through a series of texts, films, articles, etc. from Francophone Europe, North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Canada, Vietnam, and the Caribbean. Students will become acquainted with Francophone cultures and literatures while developing their interpretative and writing skills. In French.

FREN 259 Contemporary France 3-4 Credits

How is France defining itself today as a European nation in a global world? Issues to be explored include: family, gender, race and religion, the education and social systems, immigration, and politics. Strongly recommended for students who plan to study abroad in France.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 271 French Readings 4 Credits

Study of the works of some author or group of authors, or of a period, or of a literary theme.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 272 French Culture of Business 4 Credits

A course on the fundamentals of business in France. We will learn about banking, marketing, advertising, the stock market, and many other aspects of business in France. We will learn about foreign ventures in France, such as Disney and McDonald’s. We will learn how to open a bank account, apply for a job, and what life is like in a French company. Ideal for someone who wants to intern or work for an international company or a company with a French connection. Taught in French.

FREN 281 French Cultural Program 1-6 Credits

A program in a French-speaking country offering formal language courses and cultural opportunities.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 299 French Special Topics 1-6 Credits

FREN 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

FREN 311 French Classicism 4 Credits

French classical theater, novel, and criticism, with emphasis on Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Pascal, Lafayette, Malherbe, and Boileau.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 312 (AAS 312) Modernity in the Maghreb 4 Credits

Emergence of the modern self through a comparative study of textual as well as visual representations of postcolonial subjects by male and female writers and film makers. Study of the way the sociopolitical context of countries such as Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia informs the constitution of subjectivity within a multicultural and multilingual community. Issues such as patriarchy, nationalism, colonialism, postcolonialism, identity, gender, and Islam in North African literature and film from Franco-Arab traditions.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 313 The Age Of Enlightenment 4 Credits

The Philosophes and Encyclopédistes of the eighteenth century, with emphasis on Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, and Diderot.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 316 Nineteenth Century French Literature 4 Credits

Study of major nineteenth century novelists and poets.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 318 French Drama in the Twentieth Century 3 Credits

Contemporary French drama with an analysis of its origins and movements.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 320 Contemporary French Fiction 4 Credits

Reading and discussion of contemporary works of fiction (post1980). Study of how these works fit into the context of French literature and relate more specifically to major literary currents of the twentieth century.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 321 Twentieth-Century French Short Fiction 4 Credits

Examination, within the framework of short fiction, of the major literary currents that have made up twentieth-century literature. Works by Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Le Clézio, Echenoz, Sallenave, Toussaint, Diebar, Ben Jelloun, and others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 322 Contemporary French Films 4 Credits

French Films from the late 1950s to the present. Introduction to cinematograhic language and exploration of the issues of gender, power, and madness. Films by Truffaut, J-L Godard, C. Denis, A. Varda, J-J Beineix, E. Rohmer, and others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 324 The Outsider In French Fiction 4 Credits

Focus on otherness/difference in French fiction from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Reading and discussion of short stories and novels by Graffigny, Diderot, Maupassant, Gide, Camus, Duras, Beauvoir, Le Clézio and others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 325 Illegal immigration in Francophone Literature and Film 4 Credits

This course examines representations of illegal immigrants in postcolonial francophone literature and film. We will be looking at visual and textual narratives from and about those who decided to leave their African homeland to seek a better future in Europe despite the very restrictive policies adopted by most of the European Union on illegal immigration. The course will explore issues of postcolonial identity, the notions of borders, displacement, exile, trauma and how they relate to the act of writing.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 327 (WGSS 327) Women Writing In French 4 Credits

Reading and discussion of works written by women in French. The emphasis is on 19thand 20thcentury writers, such as G. Sand, Colette S. de Beauvoir, M. Duras, and Andrée Chédid.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 369 French Readings 4 Credits

Advanced study of an author, period, or theme. Topics vary. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 370 French Internship 1-8 Credits

Designed to give advanced qualified students the chance to acquire field experience and training with selected firms and governmental agencies in French-speaking countries. Assigned readings, written reports, and employer performance evaluations are required. Consent of instructor required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 371 French Independent Study 1-8 Credits

Special topics under faculty guidance, including honors thesis. for credit. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

FREN 389 Honors Project 1-6 Credits

FREN 399 French Special Topics 1-6 Credits

German Courses

GERM 001 Elementary German I 4 Credits

Fundamentals of German; reading and simple texts; simple conversation and composition; vocabulary building.Three class hours plus one laboratory or drill hour each week. No previous German required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 002 Elementary German II 4 Credits

Continuation of GERM 1, including reading of more advanced texts. Three class hours plus one laboratory or drill hour each week.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 011 Intermediate German I 4 Credits

Review of grammar, composition, reading of intermediate texts, vocabulary building.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 012 Intermediate German II 4 Credits

Continuation of GERM 011.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 091 German Language & Culture I Abroad 1-8 Credits

Intensive study of conversation in the language of the country; reading, development of writing skills and selected aspects of the culture.

GERM 163 German Civilization and Culture 4 Credits

Cultural, historical, and political evolution of Germany and German-speaking countries in Europe.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 167 German Conversation and Composition 4 Credits

Intensive practice in spoken and written German.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 169 Business German 4 Credits

German in business, the professions, international, and social relations. Letter writing, comprehension of technical texts, specialized vocabulary, and grammar review.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 181 German Cultural Program 1-8 Credits

Summer program abroad. Formal instruction in the language and the culture of a German-speaking country.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 191 German Language & Culture II Abroad 1-8 Credits

Intensive study of conversation in the language of the country; rapid review of basic grammar, the reading and analysis of moderately difficult texts, development of rudimentary writing skills, supplemented study of selected aspects of contemporary civilization. Consent of chair and proficiency examination in the target country is required.

GERM 211 German Drama 4 Credits

Drama as a literary genre; plays from various periods of German literature.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 218 (MLL 218) Goethe's "Faust" 4 Credits

Study of Goethe’s play with an introduction to the Faust tradition and Faustian themes in modern literature.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 231 (MLL 231) New German Cinema 4 Credits

Viewing, discussion, and written analysis of selected German films.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 240 Contemporary Germany 4 Credits

Readings and conversations in German about topics including the social and natural sciences, technology, the environment, politics, daily life, and sports. Practice in spoken and written German.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 250 German Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Literary and linguistic topics not covered in regular courses.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 260 (MLL 260) Multicultural Germany 4 Credits

A look at Germany from the perspective of its “others”--the immigrants. Literary and cultural texts, and films on ethnic diversity and integration.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 267 Advanced German Conversation and Composition 4 Credits

A continuation of Germ 167. Practice of speaking and writing skills in German through readings of more complex texts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 269 Advanced Professional German 4 Credits

A continuation of Business German with an emphasis on specific economic issues affecting contemporary Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. Preparation for the national exam “Certificate for the Professions” and the “International Business German Examination”.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 281 German Cultural Program 1-8 Credits

Study abroad. Formal instruction in German and direct contact with the people and the culture during at least one month in a German-speaking country. Consent of German study abroad adviser required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 291 German Language Culture II Abroad 1-8 Credits

Intensive practice of speaking and writing in the language of the country aimed at providing the student with extensive proficiency of expression and the ability to discriminate linguistic usage. Idiomatic expressions and an introduction to stylistics. Reading and analysis of more difficult texts, supplemented by in-depth study of selected aspects of contemporary civilization. Consent of chair and proficiency examination in the target country is required.

GERM 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

GERM 301 Survey Of German Literature 4 Credits

An overview of German literary traditions through the nineteenth century, focusing on the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Reformation, Baroque, Enlightenment, Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 303 (MLL 303, WGSS 303) Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 4 Credits

This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany, Europe and America. “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Cinderella”, or “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in many forms of world literature/film. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 305 Modern German Literature 4 Credits

Topics in German literature of the twentieth and twenty-first century.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 320 Berlin: Transformations of a Metropolis 4 Credits

A literary and cultural history of Berlin from its foundation to the present. After a historical overview, we will focus on the modern period that covers the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the divided city of the postwar era, the fall of the wall, and the continuing process of redefining Berlin’s identity as Germany’s old and new capital.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 345 German Short Stories 4 Credits

Readings of short prose texts in German.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 350 German Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Literary or linguistic topics not covered in regular courses. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GERM 370 German Internships 1-8 Credits

Designed to give advanced qualified students the chance to acquire field experience and training with selected firms and governmental agencies in German-speaking countries. Assigned readings, written reports, and employer performance evaluations are required. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

Hebrew Courses

HEBR 001 Elementary Modern Hebrew I 4 Credits

Class instruction will focus on the introduction of the Hebrew alphabet and basic vocabulary. Instruction will also emphasize the basics of Hebrew listening comprehension, vocabulary, reading, writing, grammar and speaking. Class activities are planned for an inclusive approach to different styles of learning. No previous study of Hebrew required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

HEBR 002 Elementary Modern Hebrew II 4 Credits

Continuation of Hebrew 1. Instruction will focus on expanding Hebrew vocabulary and grammar; introduction of the past tense. Class activities are planned for an inclusive approach to different styles of learning. Hebrew 1 or previous background in Hebrew required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

HEBR 011 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I 4 Credits

Class instruction will focus on developing fundamental patterns of conversation and expanding grammar. Hebrew 1 and Hebrew 2, or previous background in Hebrew required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

HEBR 012 Intermediate Modern Hebrew II 4 Credits

Continuation of Hebrew 011. Class instruction will focus on developing fundamental patterns of conversation and expanding grammar. Hebrew 1 and Hebrew 2, or previous background in Hebrew required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

HEBR 151 Hebrew Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Class instruction will focus on cultural, ethnic, and religious dimensions of Israeli society through film. Class discussion and writing in Hebrew will be based on related topics. Consent of instructor required. Taught in Hebrew.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

HEBR 152 Hebrew Special Topics II 4 Credits

Continuation of HEBR 151. Class instruction will focus on cultural, ethnic, and religious dimensions of Israeli society through film. Class discussion and writing in Hebrew will be based on related topics. Consent of instructor required. Taught in Hebrew.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

Japanese Courses

JPNS 001 Elementary Japanese I 4 Credits

This course introduces the basic grammatical structures commonly found in daily situations in Japan. All four aspects of language skills are introduced. Hirangana, Katakana, and approximately 50 Kanji are introduced.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 002 Elementary Japanese II 4 Credits

Continuation of JPNS 001. Approximately 100 Kanji are introduced.
Prerequisites: JPNS 001
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 011 Intermediate Japanese I 4 Credits

Continuation of JPNS 002. This course introduces more complex grammatical structures and develops all four aspects of language skills. Slightly more emphasis on reading and writing. Approximately 100 Kanji are introduced.
Prerequisites: JPNS 002
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 012 Intermediate Japanese II 4 Credits

Continuation of JPNS 011.
Prerequisites: JPNS 011
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 099 Japanese Special Topics 1-4 Credits

JPNS 131 Advanced Japanese Reading and Writing I 3 Credits

Reading, translation, and writing practice using authentic Japanese materials.
Prerequisites: JPNS 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 132 Advanced Japanese Reading and Writing II 3 Credits

Continuation of Advanced Japanese Reading and Writing I.
Prerequisites: JPNS 141 or JPNS 131
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 141 Advanced Japanese I 4 Credits

This course emphasizes advanced reading comprehension on topics related to Japan. Approximately 100 Kanji are introduced.
Prerequisites: JPNS 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 142 Advanced Japanese II 4 Credits

Continuation of JPNS 141.
Prerequisites: JPNS 141
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 151 Advanced Spoken Japanese 1 Credit

Emphasis on comprehension and oral performance of the Japanese language through discussion of current issues and other topics.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: JPNS 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 152 Advanced Spoken Japanese II 1 Credit

Continuation of JPNS 151. Emphasis on comprehension and oral performance of Japanese language through discussion of current issues and other topics. Variable content.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: JPNS 151
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 199 Japanese Special Topics 1-4 Credits

JPNS 231 Advanced Japanese Reading and Writing I 2 Credits

Reading, translation, and writing practice using authentic Japanese materials.
Prerequisites: JPNS 142 or JPNS 132
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 232 Advanced Japanese Reading and Writing II 2 Credits

Continuation of Advanced Japanese Reading and Writing I.
Prerequisites: JPNS 142 or JPNS 231
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 290 Japanese Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Literary or linguistics topics not covered in regular courses. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU, SS

JPNS 291 Advanced Japanese and Culture Abroad 1-8 Credits

Intensive practice of speaking and writing in the language of the country aimed at providing the student with extensive proficiency of expression and the ability to discriminate linguistic usage. Idiomatic expressions and an introduction to stylistics. Reading and analysis of more difficult texts, supplemented by in-depth study of selected aspects of contemporary civilization. Consent of chair and proficiency examination in the target country required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

JPNS 299 Japanese Special Topics 1-4 Credits

JPNS 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

JPNS 390 Japanese Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Literary or linguistics topics not covered in regular courses. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU, SS

Modern Languages & Literatures Courses

MLL 006 (GS 006) Globalization and Cultures 4 Credits

This course is a reflection on the processes of globalization and their consequences, both good and bad, on the world’s societies and on our concepts of culture and identity. It provides a multidisciplinary examination of what cultures gain and lose from their interaction with the rest of the world and what it means to be a citizen of a globalized yet diverse world.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 015 (ASIA 015, WGSS 015) Sex, War, Women, Art 4 Credits

hrough the study of selected visual and literary works in their historical and social contexts, students will gain knowledge of cultures in Japan. This course examines various cultures from the perspectives of gender and sexuality as constitutive factors of Japanese society. Materials include a film depicting a romantic life of samurai, art works by contemporary artists, and writings on sex workers impacted by the Japanese empire. No prior knowledge of Japanese language is required. An introductory course taught in English.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 027 Russian Classics 4 Credits

Russian classics in translation.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 051 Contemporary Hispanic-American Literature 4 Credits

Reading and discussion of distinguished Latin American writers: Borges, García Márquez, Cortázar, and Vargas Llosa.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 053 This Hispanic World and its Culture 4 Credits

Characteristics and values of the people of Spain and Latin America in literary works and other material. Hispanic cultural contributions to Western civilization.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 056 (ASIA 056, REL 056) Monkey Business 4 Credits

The search for immortality by Monkey, kongfu master and mischievous monk, is one of the most popular tales in Asia. A combination of comedy and religious quest, the traditional novel "Journey to the West" is filled with tricks and lively storytelling that teach without preaching. The class will read the entire novel looking carefully at the social context of its production but also its timeless lessons for transcendence.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 068 (ASIA 068) Japanese Language: Past and Present 4 Credits

Historical and contemporary aspects of the Japanese language, including the origins of Japanese in relation to Korean, the influence of Chinese, syntactic features which reflect the hierarchical character of Japanese society, differences in female and male speech, and use of foreign loan words.
Prerequisites: JPNS 001
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 073 (ASIA 073, WGSS 073) Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China 4 Credits

Study of the struggle for an individual “modern” identity out of traditionally defined roles for men and women as depicted by Chinese writers and filmmakers. Class, texts, and films in English. Students interested in setting up a corollary Chinese language component for credit as CHIN 371 or CHIN 251, may discuss this possibility with the professor.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 074 (ASIA 074) Chinese Cultural Program 1-8 Credits

A summer program in China, taught in English.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 075 (ASIA 075, HIST 075) Chinese Civilization 4 Credits

The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective.
Attribute/Distribution: HU, SS

MLL 076 (ASIA 076, HIST 076) Understanding Contemporary China 4 Credits

An overview of recent history, politics, economy, religion, problems of modernization, popular culture. Contemporary Chinese society viewed against the backdrop of tradition and the tumultuous history of twentieth-century China.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

MLL 078 (ASIA 078) Asian-American Studies 4 Credits

A survey of issues concerning Asians living in the United States from the perspectives of history, language, literature, and film.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 099 Modern Languages & Literature Special Topics 1-6 Credits

MLL 100 Introduction to International Film 4 Credits

An introduction to international film traditions and theory. We look at the importance of cinema as both art and entertainment and consider the social, political, and economic role of film in national and global contexts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 110 (ASIA 110, REL 110) Drinking and Immortality 4 Credits

This class explores modes of transcendence and their expression in literature and art, but most especially poetry. The primary focus is the role of drinking alcoholic beverages in traditional Chinese society and religion, but also on other modes and what is meant by the search for immortality - and the use of inner versus outer alchemy - will be examined.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 127 (ASIA 127) ORIENTations: Approaches to Modern Asia 4 Credits

An introduction to East, Southeast, and South Asia at the beginning of the 21st century. How is globalization transforming Asian societies? How are Asians represented (or misrepresented) in the West? How do Asian peoples view Western influences on them? What distinguishes our perspectives on politics, individual liberty, civic responsibility, religious faith and practice, work, etc? How is the trend toward globalization in the coming “Asian Century” likely to be affected by the growing assertiveness of nations like China and India? (H/S).

MLL 128 (GS 128) Literature and Globalization 4 Credits

An introduction to fiction as it reflects and discusses major issues related to globalization. The readings will include a selection of fiction from a diversity of world regions and will introduce the students to a theoretical reflection on the role of literary writing in a globalizing world. Students will be able to gain appreciation for the written fictional text as it takes on a diversity of issues related to globalization in a variety of world regions and cultural perspectives.

MLL 133 (AAS 133, FREN 133, HIST 133, LAS 133, POLS 133) Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity 3-4 Credits

History, culture, and politics of the French Caribbean island of Martinique, from its position as a key site of the 18th century Atlantic world economy to becoming an official French department and outpost of the European Union. Interdisciplinary perspectives on the complex nature of social identity, historical memory, and impact of globalization. No French is required. Offered during winter inter-term through Lehigh Study Abroad.

MLL 140 (ANTH 140, COGS 140) Introduction to Linguistics 4 Credits

Relationship between language and mind; formal properties of language; language and society; how languages change over time. May not be taken pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

MLL 165 (ASIA 165) Love and Revolution in Shanghai 4 Credits

Project-based course examines human relationships and political-economic changes in Shanghai through the lens of literature, film, and a selection of other readings. Discussion of conflicts between and influences of pre-communist, communist, and capitalist systems as played out in the Shanghai urban arena.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 177 (ASIA 177) China Enters the Modern Age 4 Credits

The collapse of the imperial order and China’s agonizing transformation into a modern nation-state over the past 150 years. The impact of imperialism, war, radical social change, and protracted revolution on Chinese traditions, values, and institutions.
Attribute/Distribution: HU, SS

MLL 199 Modern Languages & Literature Special Topics 1-4 Credits

MLL 202 (ENGL 202, GS 202, LAS 202) Latin American In Fact, In Fiction 4 Credits

This class couples a survey of Latin American literature in translation with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Latin America. Departing initially from readings of literary and cinematographic works, our analyses will engage methodologies from multiple disciplines including history, sociology, and cultural studies. Accordingly, this course will examine critical developments in Latin American aesthetics along with the cultural climates in which they matured. This course assumes no prior study of Spanish, Portuguese, or Latin American culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 211 German Drama 4 Credits

Drama as a literary genre; plays from various periods of German literature.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 218 (GERM 218) Goethe's "Faust" 4 Credits

Study of Goethe’s play with an introduction to the Faust tradition and Faustian themes in modern literature.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 231 (GERM 231) New German Cinema 4 Credits

Viewing, discussion, and written analysis of selected German films.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 260 (GERM 260) Multicultural Germany 4 Credits

A look at Germany from the perspective of its “others”--the immigrants. Literary and cultural texts, and films on ethnic diversity and integration.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 299 Modern Languages & Literature Special Topics 1-6 Credits

MLL 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

MLL 302 (ENGL 302, GS 302, LAS 302) Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction 4 Credits

Centering on a corpus of works presenting tales of travel and adventure, this class offers an overview of Latin American narrative genres (including “fantastic” narrative, magical realism, and postmodern fiction) from the mid 20th century to present day. Through close readings of works by Adolfo Bioy Casares and Roberto Bolaño, among others, and the analysis of filmic representations of travel in Latin America, we will examine differing modes of perceiving the region defined as Latin America.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 303 (GERM 303, WGSS 303) Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 4 Credits

This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany, Europe and America. “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Cinderella”, or “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in many forms of world literature/film. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 321 (GS 321) Intercultural Communication 4 Credits

Language is ambiguous by nature and discourse is interpreted in cultural and linguistic contexts. This course covers different cultural and linguistic strategies individuals use to communicate with each other, essential concepts for interacting with individuals from other cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and different strategies of communication as defined by specific cultures. Covering the theory and practice of intercultural interaction, this course examines assumptions about language and culture, and includes practical advice to help students develop the cultural sensitivity essential for communication today.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 326 Modernity in the Maghreb 4 Credits

The emergence of the modern self through a comparative study of textual as well as visual representations of post colonial subjects by male and female writers and film makers. How the sociopolitical context of countries such as Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia informs the constitution of subjectivity within a multicultural and multilingual community. Issues of patriarchy, nationalism, colonialism, post colonialism, identity, gender and religion in North African literature and film from Franco-Arab Traditions Taught in French.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

MLL 389 (IR 389) IR/MLL Capstone Project 4 Credits

A research project on international politics that will include original research in at least one foreign language under the joint supervision of an adviser in IR and one in the relevant language in MLL. Consent of department required.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

MLL 399 Modern Languages & Literature Special Topics 1-6 Credits

MLL 403 (WGSS 403) Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 3 Credits

This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany as well as Europe and America. Versions of “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Cinderella”, or “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in films and many forms of world literature. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.

Russian Courses

RUSS 001 Elementary Russian I 4 Credits

Classroom and laboratory, audio, and video introduction to the fundamentals of conversational and grammatical patterns; practice in pronunciation, simple conversation, reading, and writing.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 002 Elementary Russian II 4 Credits

Continuation of RUSS 001.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 011 Intermediate Russian I 4 Credits

Classroom and laboratory practice in conversation. Development of reading and writing skills.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 012 Intermediate Russian II 4 Credits

Continuation of RUSS 011.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 141 Russian Conversation and Composition I 4 Credits

Intensive practice in oral and written Russian and oral comprehension. Readings and discussions on Russian literature and culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 142 Russian Conversation and Composition II 4 Credits

Continuation of RUSS 141.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 199 Russian Special Topics 1-6 Credits

RUSS 215 Russian Classics: Russian Literature with Variable Topic and Credit 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 231 Russians In Real World I 4 Credits

Readings and conversations about selected nonliterary topics including the social and natural sciences, business, economics, the environment, current political events in Russia and throughout the former Soviet republics.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 232 Russians In Real World II 4 Credits

A continuation of RUSS 231.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 251 Russian Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of literary or linguistic topics.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 252 Russian Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of literary or linguistic topics.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

RUSS 370 Russian Internship 1-6 Credits

Designed to give advanced qualified students the chance to acquire field experience and training with selected firms and governmental agencies in Russian-speaking countries. Assigned readings, written reports, and employer performance evaluations are required. Consent of faculty committee required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

RUSS 389 Honors Project 1-8 Credits

RUSS 391 Russian Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Independent study of research under faculty guidance on a literary, linguistic, or methodological topic. for credit. May be used to satisfy the doctoral language requirement. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

Spanish Courses

SPAN 001 Elementary Spanish I 4 Credits

Basic conversational Spanish illustrating essential grammatical principles. Reading of simple texts and writing.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 002 Elementary Spanish II 4 Credits

Continuation of SPAN 1.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 011 Intermediate Spanish I 4 Credits

Limited review of elementary grammar concepts and introduction to more advanced grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on discussion, reading, and writing about short literary works and current topics in the Spanish-speaking world.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 012 Intermediate Spanish II 4 Credits

Continuation of SPAN 011.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 091 Spanish Language & Culture Abroad 1-8 Credits

Intensive study of conversation in the language of the country; reading, development of writing skills and selected aspects of the culture.

SPAN 133 Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation 4 Credits

Comparison of Spanish and English sounds; descriptions of Spanish vowels and consonants in their various positions. Oral practice with special emphasis on accent and intonation patterns.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 141 Advanced Spanish Grammar 4 Credits

Intensive review of Spanish grammar with stress on finer points. Analysis of syntax and style. Improvement of grammar through composition. Heritage speakers should substitute with another 100-level class.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 142 Advanced Conversational Spanish 4 Credits

Conversational practice stressing the building of vocabulary based on literary texts and topics of general interest. Designed to stimulate fluent and spontaneous use of spoken Spanish. does not count toward completion of major.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 151 Cultural Evolution Spain 4 Credits

The historical and cultural evolution of Spain. Discussion of representative literary works in their cultural and historical contexts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 152 (LAS 152) Cultural Evolution of Latin America 4 Credits

The historical and cultural evolution of Latin America. Discussion of representative literary works in their cultural and historical contexts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 191 (ALLN 191) Spanish Language & Culture Abroad II 1-8 Credits

Intensive study of conversation in the language of the country; rapid review of basic grammar, the reading and analysis of moderately difficult texts, development of rudimentary writing skills, supplemented study of selected aspects of contemporary civilaztions. Prerequisites: consent of chair and proficiency examination in the target country.

SPAN 199 Spanish Special Topics 3-4 Credits

For students who take a course, not offered at Lehigh, at another institution. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 211 (LAS 211) Business Spanish 4 Credits

An introduction to business concepts and vocabulary in Spanish. Letter writing, specialized professional vocabulary, and review of grammar.
Prerequisites: SPAN 141
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 212 Spanish Writing Skills 4 Credits

Improving writing proficiency through practice in composition and translation.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 213 (LAS 213) Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Film 4 Credits

An introduction to the analysis of Latin American and Spanish cultural productions (mainly literature and film).
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 243 (LAS 243) Indigenous Cultures in Spanish America 4 Credits

A survey of Spanish American narratives that deal with the relationship between indigenous and occidental cultures. While examining works created from the late 19th century up until present day, we analyze the construction of cultural identity in several countries including Bolivia, Ecuador, and Mexico. Analysis will include works of poetry, short story, novel, essay, and film by several influential artists: Clorinda Matto de Turner, Jorge Icaza and José María Arguedas, to name just a few.

SPAN 263 (LAS 263) The Spanish American Short Story 4 Credits

Comparative study of representative works by major writers such as Quiroga, Borges, and Cortazar, among others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 265 (LAS 265) Spanish and Latin American Cinema 4 Credits

An introduction to cinema in the Spanish-speaking world. Oral discussion and written analysis of selected films. Students view films independently.
Prerequisites: SPAN 141
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 270 Communicating in Spanish for Medical Personnel 4 Credits

For prospective medical personnel communicating with Spanish-speaking patients. Dialogues, healthcare vocabulary. Review of grammar.
Prerequisites: SPAN 141
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 275 (LAS 275, WGSS 275) Introduction to Hispanic Women Writers 4 Credits

The objective of this class is to introduce students to Hispanic contemporary female authors from Latin America, Spain, and the United States through the analysis of all literary genres (novel, short story, poetry, essay, and drama). This class provides students with a solid introduction to Hispanic women’s writing from the last years of the Nineteenth Century to the present, as well as to feminist literary theory.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 276 (LAS 276) Contemporary Literature Of The Southern Cone 4 Credits

This course focuses on the literature of Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay from the beginning of the 20th Century to the present. It analyzes the works of major authors through different genres studying how they represent history and culture, particularly during periods of political instability and state violence. Texts by Jorge Luis Borges, Pablo Neruda, Manuel Puig, Griselda Gambaro, Cristina Peri Rossi, and Antonio Skarmeta, among others, are studied.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 290 Spanish Special Topics 2-4 Credits

Study of an author or theme, or completion of a special project. Topics may vary. for credit.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 291 (ALLN 291) Spanish Language & Culture Abroad III 1-8 Credits

Intensive practice of speaking and writing in the language of the country aimed at providing the student with extensive proficiency of expression and the ability to discriminate linguistic usage. Idiomatic expressions and an introduction to stylistics. Reading and analysis of more difficult texts, supplemented by in-depth study of selected aspects of contemporary civilization. Consent of chair and proficiency examination in the target country.

SPAN 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

SPAN 308 Spanish Novel Since 1939 4 Credits

The evolution of the novel from post civil war to the present. Reading of Cela, Laforet, Delibes, Rodoreda, and Marsé, among others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 320 (LAS 320) Literature of the Spanish Caribbean 4 Credits

Study of representative works with emphasis on Cuba and Puerto Rico. Writers include Barnet, Carpentier, Sánchez, and Rodriguez Juliá.
Prerequisites: LAS 152 or SPAN 152
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 321 (LAS 321) Children and Adolescents in Contemporary Spanish American Literature 4 Credits

Discussion of narrative techniques and the category of the self as they relate to the images of adolescence and childhood in works by such authors as Vargas Llosa, Reinaldo Arenas, José Bianco, Silvina Ocampo.
Prerequisites: LAS 152 or SPAN 152
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 322 (LAS 322) The Short Novel in Contemporary Spanish American Literature 4 Credits

Reading and discussion of representative works by García Márquez, Onetti, Rulfo, and Bioy Casares, among others.
Prerequisites: LAS 152 or SPAN 152
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 323 (LAS 323) Literature and Revolution in Contemporary Cuba 4 Credits

Study of works written after 1959 by dissident, nondissident, and exiled authors (Desnoes, Norberto Fuentes, Benítez Rojo, and Pedro Juan Gutiérrez, among others).
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 325 (LAS 325) Hispanic Literature Of The United States 4 Credits

Discussion of fiction, poetry, drama, and film from the main groups in the U.S. Hispanic population. Discussion of Hispanic ethnic identity, bilingualism, and minority issues.
Prerequisites: LAS 152 or SPAN 152
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 326 (LAS 326, WGSS 326) Tradition and Resistance: Women Writers of Latin America 4 Credits

Study of poetry and narrative works by Latin American women writers. Authors include Rosario Ferré, Rosario Castellanos, Elena Poniatowska, and Cristina Peri Rossi, among others.
Prerequisites: SPAN 152
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 342 (LAS 342) The New Narrative in Spanish American Literature 4 Credits

Critical evaluation of distinguished works of Spanish American prose fiction of the 1960’s and 70’s. Readings by Donoso, Fuentes, García Márquez, and Vargas Llosa, among others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 345 (LAS 345) Testimonial Writing of the Hispanic World 4 Credits

This course explores the genre testimonio, which confronts the official history of the Latin American and Spanish dictatorships and portrays the experiences and struggles of those who suffered political repression. The course focuses on the analysis of both literary and visual testimonios from the Hispanic world, as well as on theoretical issues concerning discourses of truth.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 346 (LAS 346, WGSS 346) Contemporary Hispanic Women Writers: The Novelists 4 Credits

This course explores the works of Hispanic women writers who have been oppositional to hegemonic cultural politics during the Twentieth Century in Latin America and Spain. Within their particular contexts, we examine issues these writers define as important in their work, their literary and political impact, use of literature to empower minority positions, and their narratives’ effects on the changing literary canon. Selected topics include: historical interpretations, exile, forms of violence and repression, expressions of desire, and sexuality.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 379 Spanish Internship 2-4 Credits

Designed to give advanced qualified students the chance to acquire field experience and training with selected firms and governmental agencies in Spanish-speaking countries or U.S. agencies serving the Hispanic community. Assigned readings, written reports, and employer performance evaluations are required. Students must be registered through an educational institution to receive credit. Consent of instructor required.
Prerequisites: SPAN 141
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 389 Honors Project 1-8 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

SPAN 390 Spanish Special Topics 2-4 Credits

Study of an author, theme or period. Topics vary. for credit. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 391 (LAS 391) Melodrama in Contemporary Spanish American Narrative 4 Credits

From the earliest works of Latin American narrative onward, melodrama has served as a fundamental tool for the structuring of dramatic conflict. Ranging from the programmatic social novel to the most parodic contemporary works, we will carefully examine the aims of melodramatic narration in works by Roberto Arlt and Mario Vargas Llosa, among others, as well as in various films and telenovelas.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 392 (LAS 392) The City and the Country in Spanish American Narrative 4 Credits

Across the history of the region defined as Latin America, urbanization, on the one hand, and the isolation of national interiors, on the other, have contributed to a problematic relationship between the city and the country. In examining works by the likes of Roberto Arlt, José Donoso, and Mario Bellatin, among others, this course examines the dialogue between the ostensibly separate environs of city and country, and questions they ways in which they influence one another.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

SPAN 393 (LAS 393) The Boom and Beyond 4 Credits

This class will examine works from the so-called Boom of Spanish American literature in the 1960s alongside texts produced following this crucial moment of artistic and social change throughout Latin America. Moving from the Boom toward the postmodern, we will consider works by Gabriel García Márquez, Manuel Puig, and Mario Levrero, among others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

Professors. Marie-Helene Chabut, PhD (University of California San Diego); Constance A. Cook, PhD (University of California Berkeley); Kiri Lee, PhD (Harvard University); Mary A. Nicholas, PhD (University of Pennsylvania)

Associate Professors. Marie-Sophie Armstrong, PhD (University of Oregon); Taieb Berrada, PhD (Northwestern University); Matthew R. Bush, PhD (University of Colorado Boulder); Antonio Prieto, PhD (Princeton University); Vera S. Stegmann, PhD (Indiana University)

Assistant Professors. Thomas Chen, PhD (University of California Los Angeles); Olivia Landry, PhD (Indiana University Bloomington); Miguel Pillado, PhD (University of California Berkeley); Sara Lindsey Reuben, MA (Columbia University); Nobuko Yamasaki, PhD (University of Washington)

Lecturers. Jessica Racines Brandt, MA (Lehigh University); Eunice Cortez, PhD (Temple University)

Professor Of Practice. Limei Shan, MS (East China Normal University)

Emeriti. Linda S. Lefkowitz, PhD (Princeton University); David W. Pankenier, PhD (Stanford University); Anje C. Van Der Naald, PhD (University of Illinois Urbana); Lenora D. Wolfgang, PhD (University of Pennsylvania)