2016-17 Catalog

Global Studies

Program Director: Bruce Whitehouse, Ph.D. (Brown)

Email: bruce.whitehouse@lehigh.edu  ♦  Phone: 610-758-4821

Website:  http://global.cas2.lehigh.edu/

Supported by the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs 610-758-3996; incasip@lehigh.edu
Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive


Core Faculty

Kelly Austin, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology); William Bulman, Ph.D. (Department of History); Marie-Hélène Chabut, Ph.D. (Department of Modern Languages and Literatures); Vera Fennell, Ph.D. (Department of Political Science); Jack Lule, Ph.D. (Department of Journalism and Communication); Ageliki Nicholopoulou, Ph.D. (Department of Psychology); Rob Rozehnal, Ph.D. (Department of Religion Studies); John Savage, Ph.D. (Department of History); Bruce Whitehouse, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology)


Terrorism. Poverty. The dollar. Global warming. The World Cup. Immigration. K-pop. The United Nations. Ebola. McDonald’s.

Almost every aspect of human existence has been touched by the dynamic of globalization, which may be the defining characteristic of the 21st Century.

Yet, the origins, history, evolution, and impact of globalization – even its very definition – are subject to intense debate. We can surely say, however, that every student leaving college and entering the workforce – the world – should have a fundamental understanding of globalization.

Such understanding will give students crucial knowledge and skills that will set them apart in this new world and help them succeed in an increasingly globalized context. It will help them anticipate the social, cultural, economic and political changes brought about by globalization — and the resistance to globalization. It will better prepare students to draw connections in an interdependent and interconnected world.

Global Studies is a relatively new and increasingly popular major at universities worldwide, including Yale, UCLA, the London School of Economics and others. Different from study in an individual department, Global Studies is emphatically interdisciplinary, with professors from anthropology, journalism, sociology, modern languages and literature, religion studies, political science, history, international relations, and others. Increasingly, the most important questions cannot be answered by one discipline but by the combined efforts of multiple disciplines.

Although study of globalization has been conducted at Lehigh for years, the University formally created the Globalization and Social Change Initiative in Fall 2006, and the major in Global Studies followed soon after.

The Initiative’s three main areas of focus are Global Communication, Culture and Identity, and Politics and Social Structures. Rooted in these areas of interest, the major examines how the forces of globalization shape and are shaped by history, culture, economics, art, politics, communication, and other fundamental aspects of the human condition.

In many Global Studies programs, students choose from a sprawling array of courses tied together by virtue of international content. Global Studies at Lehigh directs students in a more focused manner to core courses that confront, from the perspectives of multiple disciplines, perhaps the single, central force shaping the world today – globalization.

The program requires a total of 40 credits, advanced language proficiency, a semester of study abroad, and a senior seminar.

The program also takes advantage of Lehigh’s NGO (non-government organization) status at the United Nations. Students have the opportunity to meet and work with UN officials. A number of Global students become delegates to the UN for international NGOs while they are still at Lehigh.

Careers in Global Studies

Career opportunities are numerous for graduates of Global Studies. Professions in the 21st century increasingly are demanding global understanding and expertise as well as the ability to take on interdisciplinary work across boundaries. People trained in the interdisciplinary field of Global Studies have increasing advantages over those trained in a single discipline.

Through the Global Studies major, students acquire a strong grounding in global affairs and an understanding of the complex phenomenon of globalization. They engage in problem-solving across boundaries and cultures. They are able to critically and analytically evaluate information from a comparative perspective. They learn to be effective communicators and learn to argue and defend complex views in writing, such as policy papers, and public speaking, such as individual and group presentations, to a variety of global audiences.

Lehigh’s Global Studies graduates have gone on to work for employers in the areas of business and finance (Credit Suisse First Boston, Edward Jones, Goldman Sachs, IBM Consulting, JP Morgan), media (A&E Networks, Getty Images, Hearst Magazines, News China, Viacom New Media), and nonprofits and the public sector (Habitat for Humanity, Israel Teaching Fellows, Peace Corps, Teach for America). Others have established careers with governmental, non-governmental, and for-profit organizations in the fields of public policy, energy consulting, public relations, and health care.

Global Studies Major

Introductory Course4
Introduction to Global Studies
Core Courses20
Select one course from each core area that explores how globalization shapes and is shaped by social, cultural, economic, and political factors.
Arts and Humanities Core
World Stories Literary Expressions Globalization
Globalization and Religion
History Core
Histories of Globalization
Culture Core
Cultural Diversity and Human Nature
Cultural Studies and Globalization
Political Economy Core
The Political Economy of Globalization
Politics Core
Introduction to World Politics
Comparative Politics
Introduction to Political Thought
Elective Coursework16
Select four elective courses (see list below). 1,2
Senior Seminar4
A 300-level writing intensive Global Studies course designated as a senior seminar.
Collateral Requirements
Language Study
Global Studies majors are required to complete the equivalent of six semesters of language study in a language taught at Lehigh other than the student’s native language. This requirement can be fulfilled using credits from high school AP language tests reported to Lehigh's registrar, from courses taken at Lehigh, from courses taken elsewhere, or some combination of these. It may be fulfilled all in one language (advanced level), or by studying the equivalent of four semesters of one language and an additional two semesters of a second language.
Study abroad
12 credits of study abroad. A lower number of study abroad credits and/or coursework can be substituted, with the guidance of an adviser, if student is financially or academically unable to fulfill the requirement. Courses taken during study abroad may be counted toward satisfaction of major requirements with adviser approval.
Total Credits44
1

In consult with the Global Studies adviser, students can choose from a wide variety of Global Studies courses each semester, including but not limited to the courses listed.

2

At least two electives must be 200-level or above.

Global Studies Minor

A minor in Global Studies consists of four courses with at least one core course and at least one class at the 200 level or above. Visits to the UN as well as study abroad or Lehigh Abroad are strongly recommended.  To declare a minor in Global Studies, students  must complete a minor declaration form

GS 001Introduction to Global Studies4
Select one course from the list of core courses.4
Select two courses from the list of elective courses. 1, 2, 38
Total Credits16
1

 One class must be 200 level or above.

2

Core courses may substitute for elective courses. 

3

 With the approval of the program director, Global Studies minors may identify other courses not included on the elective list to satisfy the elective requirement.

eLECTIVE COURSES

Students choose from a wide variety of courses each semester that can satisfy the Global Studies major's requirement for elective courses. The following list shows the courses that have satisfied this requirement in the past. Note that some of these courses are offered infrequently. With the approval of their major advisor, Global Studies majors may identify other courses not included on this list to satisfy the elective requirement.  Additionally, special topics courses offered by departments or programs may satisfy the elective requirement.  Click here for a printable list of Global Studies approved electives.

000 and 100 LEVEL ELECTIVES

Africana Studies
Introduction to Africana Studies
African Civilization
Introduction to Black Religions and Hip-Hop
Race and Ethnicity in Latin America and the Spanish Speaking Caribbean
Race, Racism, and Philosophy
Literature from Developing Nations
Arts of the Black World 16th-20th Centuries
Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
Global Hip Hop and Social Change
Afro-Latino Social Movements in Latin America & the Caribbean
Cuba: Race, Revolution and Culture
Peoples and Cultures of Africa
Anthropology
Comparative Cultures
Environment and Culture
Anthropology of Gender
Medical Anthropology
Peoples and Cultures of Africa
Indigenous Cultures of Latin America
Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
Southeast Asian Migrants and Refugees
Art
Arts of the Black World 16th-20th Centuries
Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times
France from Medieval to Modern:Soc., Pol. & Art
Asian Studies
Mountains, Buddhas, Ancestors: Introduction to East Asian Religions
Religions of South Asia
East Asian International Relations
U.S.-China Relations
Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China
Chinese Civilization
Understanding Contemporary China
The Islamic Tradition
Social Issues in Contemporary China
The Podcast and the Lotus
ORIENTations: Approaches to Modern Asia
Islam and the Modern World
Pilgrims, Bandits, Traders, Nuns: Traveling Religious Identities in Asia
U.S.-China Relations
Japan in a Changing World
Love and Revolution in Shanghai
Religious Nationalism in South Asia
Engaged Buddhism
Buddhism in the Modern World
The Last Samurai
China Enters the Modern Age
Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
Southeast Asian Migrants and Refugees
Environmental Studies
Environment and the Consumer Society
Political and Environmental Geography
Environmental Values and Ethics
The Politics of the Environment
Environment and Culture
English
Literature from Developing Nations
The Playwright as Traveler
German
German Civilization and Culture
Global Studies
Globalization and Cultures
Religion and Food
Religious Fundamentalism in Global Perspective
Explorations in Dialogue
The Islamic Tradition
Technology and World History
Jewish Community and Identity
The Podcast and the Lotus
Arts of the Black World 16th-20th Centuries
Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times
Globalization and Religion
Religious Nationalism in a Global Perspective
Islam and the Modern World
Pilgrims, Bandits, Traders, Nuns: Traveling Religious Identities in Asia
Islam Across Cultures
Religious Nationalism in South Asia
France from Medieval to Modern:Soc., Pol. & Art
Health, Medicine and Society
History of Modern Medicine
Medical Anthropology
Medical Humanities
History
African Civilization
Inventing the Modern World: Europe in Global Perspective, 1648-present
Pirates of the Caribbean and Other Rogues of the Atlantic World
History of Latin America
Chinese Civilization
Understanding Contemporary China
Technology and World History
History of Modern Medicine
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
The Holocaust: History and Meaning
Europe in the Age of Total War, 1870-1945
Contemporary Europe
The Last Samurai
France from Medieval to Modern:Soc., Pol. & Art
International Relations
East Asian International Relations
U.S.-China Relations
U.S.-China Relations
Japan in a Changing World
Jewish Studies
Jewish Community and Identity
Journalism and Communication
Media, Sports and Society
Latin American Studies
Race and Ethnicity in Latin America and the Spanish Speaking Caribbean
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
Cultural Evolution of Latin America
Afro-Latino Social Movements in Latin America & the Caribbean
Cuba: Race, Revolution and Culture
Indigenous Cultures of Latin America
Modern Languages and Literatures
Globalization and Cultures
Russian Classics
Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China
Chinese Civilization
Understanding Contemporary China
Introduction to International Film
ORIENTations: Approaches to Modern Asia
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
Love and Revolution in Shanghai
China Enters the Modern Age
Philosophy
Intro: Ethics In Global Perspectives
Race, Racism, and Philosophy
Political Science
Environmental Values and Ethics
The Politics of the Environment
Global Citizenship and its Discontents
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
Religion Studies
Spiritual Journeys
Mountains, Buddhas, Ancestors: Introduction to East Asian Religions
Religion and Food
Introduction to Black Religions and Hip-Hop
Religious Fundamentalism in Global Perspective
Religions of South Asia
Explorations in Dialogue
The Islamic Tradition
The Podcast and the Lotus
Globalization and Religion
Religious Nationalism in a Global Perspective
Islam and the Modern World
Pilgrims, Bandits, Traders, Nuns: Traveling Religious Identities in Asia
Islam Across Cultures
The Holocaust: History and Meaning
Religious Nationalism in South Asia
Engaged Buddhism
Buddhism in the Modern World
Sociology
Social Origins Of Terrorism
Race and Ethnicity in the Americas
Women's Work in Global Perspective
Social Issues in Contemporary China
Jewish Community and Identity
Global Hip Hop and Social Change
Afro-Latino Social Movements in Latin America & the Caribbean
Cuba: Race, Revolution and Culture
Spanish
Cultural Evolution Spain
Cultural Evolution of Latin America
Science, Technology and Society
History of Modern Medicine
Theatre
The Playwright as Traveler
Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China
Women's Work in Global Perspectives
Anthropology of Gender

200 and 300 LEVEL ELECTIVES

Africana Studies
Global Contemporary: Recent Art Movements Around the World
Caribbean Artistic and Cultural Traditions
Gender, Race and Sexuality: The Social Construction of Differences
Modernity in the Maghreb
Social Movements
Globalization and Development in Africa
Africans and the Atlantic World
United States and Africa
Slavery and the American South
Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa
Colonialism and the Black Radical Tradition
Anthropology
Global Capitalism
Globalization and Development in Africa
Economic Anthropology
Food For Thought
Religion, Witchcraft And Shamanism
Buddhism and Society
Architecture
Architecture and the City since WWII
Paris: Plan of Metropolis
Art
Global Contemporary: Recent Art Movements Around the World
Latino Visual Arts and Culture in American Art
Asia
Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia
Poet, Meditator, King: Classics of East Asian Religion
Islamic Mysticism
Buddhism and Ecology
Buddhism and Society
The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia
Japanese Industrialization
Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa
Internship in Asian Studies
Chinese Foreign Policy
Advanced Readings in Asian Studies
Communication
Global Communication
English
Introduction to Methods of English as a Second Language Instruction
Latin American In Fact, In Fiction
Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction
Contemporary World and Postcolonial Literature
Environmental Studies
Buddhism and Ecology
Comparative Environmental Law & Policy
Environmental Justice and the Law
Globalization and the Environment
French
Introduction to the Francophone World
Postcolonizing France: North African Immigration
Introduction to the Francophone World
Contemporary France
Modernity in the Maghreb
Nineteenth Century French Literature
French Drama in the Twentieth Century
Contemporary French Fiction
Twentieth-Century French Short Fiction
Contemporary French Films
The Outsider In French Fiction
Women Writing In French
German
German Drama
New German Cinema
Contemporary Germany
Multicultural Germany
Survey Of German Literature
Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film
Modern German Literature
Berlin: Transformations of a Metropolis
German Short Stories
Global Studies
Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia
Latin American In Fact, In Fiction
Global Contemporary: Recent Art Movements Around the World
International Communication
Islamic Mysticism
Global Communication
Paris: Plan of Metropolis
Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction
Seminar in Globalization and Culture
Seminar in Globalization and Communication
Global Capitalism
Intercultural Communication
Global Health Issues
Globalization and Development in Africa
Nationalism in Comparative Perspective
Global Food Systems
Global Migration
Gendered Experience of Globalization
The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia
Gender and Third World Development
Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa
The British Empire and the Modern World
Destruction and Reconstruction of Europe, 1879-1950
Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Globalization and the Environment
Readings in Global Studies
Directed Research in Global Studies
Internship in Global Studies
Honors Thesis
Health, Medicine and Society
Global Health Issues
History
Paris: Plan of Metropolis
Africans and the Atlantic World
United States and Africa
Slavery and the American South
Japanese Industrialization
The British Empire and the Modern World
Revolutions in Modern European History
History of Total War
History of Fascism
Destruction and Reconstruction of Europe, 1879-1950
The French Revolution and Napoleon
International Relations
International Organization
Comparative Environmental Law & Policy
Non-State Actors in a Globalized World
Chinese Foreign Policy
Journalism
International Communication
Latin American Studies
Latin American In Fact, In Fiction
Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Film
Latino Visual Arts and Culture in American Art
Indigenous Cultures in Spanish American Narrative
Spanish and Latin American Cinema
Introduction to Hispanic Women Writers
Contemporary Literature of the Southern Cone
Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction
Literature of the Spanish Caribbean
Children and Adolescents in Contemporary Spanish American Literature
The Short Novel in Contemporary Spanish American Literature
Literature and Revolution in Contemporary Cuba
Tradition and Resistance: Women Writers of Latin America
Contemporary Hispanic Women Writers: The Novelists
Modern Languages and Literatures
Latin American In Fact, In Fiction
German Drama
New German Cinema
Multicultural Germany
Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction
Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film
Intercultural Communication
Philosophy
Figures/Themes in Race, Racism, and Philosophy
Political Science
Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia
Politics Of The European Union
Politics Of Western Europe
Nationalism in Comparative Perspective
Latin American Political Systems
U.S. Foreign Policy and Latin America
Religion and Politics in Latin America
The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia
Gender and Third World Development
Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa
Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective
Environmental Justice and the Law
Globalization and Social Well-Being
Psychology
Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Religion Studies
Poet, Meditator, King: Classics of East Asian Religion
Islamic Mysticism
Buddhism and Ecology
Critics of Modernity
Religion, Witchcraft And Magic
Buddhism and Society
Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective
Russian
Russian Classics: Russian Literature with Variable Topic and Credit
Russians In Real World I
Russians In Real World II
Sociology
Gender, Race and Sexuality: The Social Construction of Differences
Social Movements
Seminar in Globalization and Social Issues
Global Health Issues
Global Food Systems
Global Migration
Gendered Experience of Globalization
Colonialism and the Black Radical Tradition
Globalization and the Environment
Spanish
Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Film
Indigenous Cultures in Spanish America
The Spanish American Short Story
Spanish and Latin American Cinema
Introduction to Hispanic Women Writers
Contemporary Literature Of The Southern Cone
Literature of the Spanish Caribbean
Children and Adolescents in Contemporary Spanish American Literature
The Short Novel in Contemporary Spanish American Literature
Hispanic Literature Of The United States
Literature and Revolution in Contemporary Cuba
Tradition and Resistance: Women Writers of Latin America
The New Narrative in Spanish American Literature
Testimonial Writing of the Hispanic World
Contemporary Hispanic Women Writers: The Novelists
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Introduction to Hispanic Women Writers
Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film
Gender, Race and Sexuality: The Social Construction of Differences
Tradition and Resistance: Women Writers of Latin America
Gendered Experience of Globalization
Gender and Third World Development
Contemporary Hispanic Women Writers: The Novelists

Courses

GS 001 Introduction to Global Studies 4 Credits

Globalization - the historical and continuing integration of peoples, cultures, markets and nations - is the defining characteristic of our century. It brings with it advantages and disadvantages, surfeit and suffering. In this interdisciplinary course, the foundation of the Global Studies major, students will be introduced to a variety of historical, critical and analytical perspectives, methods and vocabularies for continued study of globalization and social change. Priority given to CAS freshmen and sophomores.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 003 (POLS 003) Comparative Politics 4 Credits

The political systems of foreign countries; approaches to the study of comparative politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 006 (MLL 006) Globalization and Cultures 4 Credits

This course is a reflection on the processes of globalization and their consequences, both good and bad, on the world’s societies and on our concepts of culture and identity. It provides a multidisciplinary examination of what cultures gain and lose from their interaction with the rest of the world and what it means to be a citizen of a globalized yet diverse world.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 013 (REL 013) Religion and Food 4 Credits

This course explores the complex connections between religion and food. We will examine food-related rituals, including Jewish Passover seders, Christian communion, and Hindu puja; the role of gastronomy in forming religious and ethnic identity; and the global ethics of food and sustainability. We will also probe the notion of food itself as sacred. Are “foodies” engaging in their own sort of sacred actions? How does food connect with the sublime? The class will include tastings and outings as scheduling permits.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 044 (REL 044) Religious Fundamentalism in Global Perspective 4 Credits

This course will explore the rise of fundamentalist religious movements and their involvement in violent conflicts. Topics to be considered will include the relationship between fundamentalist religious ideologies and terrorism, and the kinds of responses that fundamentalist religious movements present to the development of a global marketplace and the spread of secular nationalisms.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 062 (REL 062) Explorations in Dialogue 4 Credits

Course critically investigates inter-religious dialogue, an important issue in the contemporary academic study of religion. Focus will be on the problem of inter-religious encounter; religion and globalization; different models of dialogue; and the questions of power and identity. At least two traditions will be put into conversation for any proposed offering (e.g., Christian-Buddhist, Jewish-Muslim, Jewish-Christian).
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 077 (ASIA 077, REL 077) The Islamic Tradition 4 Credits

A thematic introduction to Islamic history, doctrine and practice. Topics include: Qur’an; prophecy and sacred history; ritual practices; community life; legal interpretation; art and aesthetics; mysticism; politics and polemics.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 100 (PHIL 100, POLS 100) Introduction to Political Thought 4 Credits

A critical examination of political ideologies: Liberalism, Marxism, Fascism, and Islamism.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

GS 101 (HIST 101) Histories of Globalization 4 Credits

Critical historical perspectives on current debates around “globalization” and the varied paths and responses to modernity, using recent scholarship associated with the New Global History. The “Rise of the West” paradigm, Industrial Revolution and modernization theory; creation of global financial markets, nation-building and New Imperialism; Great Depression and World Wars as global historical events; postwar decolonization, Cold War and emergence of North-South relations; impact of consumerism, movements for women's rights, ethnic nationalism and religious fundamentalist movements in tradition-bound societies.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 106 (ANTH 106) Cultural Studies and Globalization 4 Credits

This course closely examines the complex relationship between culture and globalization. The impact of globalization on local culture is an essential topic. But the interaction of globalization and culture is not a oneway process. People around the world adapt globalization to their own uses, merging global cultural flows with local practices in transformative ways. The course will study the interaction of local culture with globalizing forces; immigration and culture; the localizing of mass culture; cultures of diasporic and migratory groups, and globalization, gender and identity.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 107 (HIST 107) Technology and World History 4 Credits

Development of technology and its relationship to political, economic, military, and cultural aspects of world civilization from pyramids to the present period.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 116 (JST 116, SOC 116) Jewish Community and Identity 4 Credits

A century ago, large Jewish communities existed throughout the world, including North Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and South America. Today, over 80% of all Jews live in North America or Israel. This course focuses on these historical changes in Jewish communities and the transformation of Jewish identities and social life in recent years, particularly in the U.S. and in Israel.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 119 (ASIA 119, REL 119) The Podcast and the Lotus 4 Credits

Buddhism is increasingly a global phenomenon. Contemporary Buddhist teachers stay in touch with students via podcasts, WeChat, Twitter and Facebook. Buddhists from Singapore, Tibet, Japan, Mexico, Taiwan or Pennsylvania now meet via new technology. This class asks, how is Buddhism now a global religion? what effect has this had? How is Buddhism a "modern" religion? Students explore issues of conversion, modernity, globalization, new technology, migration and travel. Sources include autobiography, film, travel writing, political essays, interviews, social media, ethnography.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 124 (AAS 124, ART 124) Arts of the Black World 16th-20th Centuries 4 Credits

This course covers artistic practices originating in Africa that subsequently influenced countless world cultures. The material covers artistic production and theory of arts of the enslaved populations in the AnteBellum South, early African American painting through the Harlem Renaissance, the religious arts of Haiti (Vodou) and Cuba (Santería), and contemporary production from Black Brazilian, American and European artists. Students should be prepared to attend Museums/galleries during the semester.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 125 (AAS 125, ART 125) Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times 4 Credits

This course is structured around case studies of art and architecture from early traditions up through the present. The focus is on cultural production, religious art and architecture (local as well as Christian and Muslim traditions), craftsmanship, style, materials, trade, and international exhibition of art objects in Museums. The literature draws from art historical, anthropological, and historical analyses as well as museum studies. Students should be prepared to attend Museums/galleries during the semester.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 126 The Political Economy of Globalization 4 Credits

This course studies the relationship among economic, political and cultural forces in an era of globalization. Focus is on how global capitalism, the world market and local economics shape and are shaped by social, cultural and historical forces. Topics include political and cultural determinants of trade and investment; culture and the global economy; global capitalism, especially studied through the lens of culture; globalization and patterns of economic growth; cross-cultural study of consumerism; poverty and inequality; the interplay of foreign and domestic economic policy; international economic organizations, such as the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank, and globalization and national development.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 128 (MLL 128) Literature and Globalization 4 Credits

An introduction to fiction as it reflects and discusses major issues related to globalization. The readings will include a selection of fiction from a diversity of world regions and will introduce the students to a theoretical reflection on the role of literary writing in a globalizing world. Students will be able to gain appreciation for the written fictional text as it takes on a diversity of issues related to globalization in a variety of world regions and cultural perspectives.

GS 140 (REL 140) Globalization and Religion 4 Credits

This course examines the complexity of globalization and its multi-layered impact on religious identity and piety. Though comparative in methodology and historical framework, the class will give special attention to Islam and Hinduism in South Asia. Topics include: European colonialism; Orientalism and its legacy; religious nationalism; Islamophobia; and the Internet and mass media.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 143 (REL 143) Religious Nationalism in a Global Perspective 4 Credits

Religion has become a renewed political force on the world stage in recent years. This course will focus on how religion has often provided both the Ideological language and the organizing principles for many modern nationalisms. Our exploration of this topic will take the form of case studies from various parts of the world, including but not limited to Pakistan, Israel, No. Ireland, India, Iran and USA.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 145 (ASIA 145, REL 145) Islam and the Modern World 4 Credits

Examines how numerous Muslim thinkers-religious scholars, modernists, and Islamists-have responded to the changes and challenges of the colonial and post-colonial eras. Special emphasis is placed on the public debates over Islamic authority and authenticity in contemporary South Asia.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 147 (ASIA 147, REL 147) Pilgrims, Bandits, Traders, Nuns: Traveling Religious Identities in Asia 4 Credits

This course examines religious networks linking Chinese, Tibetan, Himalayan, and Inner Asian people, places, and institutions to Asia and the world. We explore examples of 19th, 20th century and present day transnational religious identities, emerging from trade, religious travel and pilgrimage, refugee migrations, labor migrations, and modern day leisure travel. We consider religious identity, nationalism, transnationalism, and globalization, using literary, historical, and ethnographic sources, and film, video, and popular media.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 148 (REL 148) Islam Across Cultures 4 Credits

Explores the Muslim world’s diversity and dynamism in multiple cultural contests-from the Middle East and North Africa, to Asia and America-through literature, ethnography, and films. Topics include: travel and trade networks; education; women and gender; Islam and cultural pluralism; colonialism; and identity politics.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 166 (ASIA 166, REL 166) Religious Nationalism in South Asia 4 Credits

This course explores the conflation and conflict of religion and politics in one of the most complex, dynamic and volatile regions on the planet (South Asia). Through literature, film and scholarly writings, students will examine the history of cooperation and conflict between the Muslim and Hindu communities in South Asia-from the movements for national independence to twenty-first century identity politics.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 183 (ART 183, HIST 183) France from Medieval to Modern:Soc., Pol. & Art 3 Credits

France's artistic, cultural, social, artistic and political development from early kingship and dominance of the Church in the Middle Ages to the grandeur of Versailles in the Age of Absolutism; radical transformations of culture and society during the French Revolution and advent of the Modern Nation-State; to twentieth century developments including the two World Wars, imperialism and impact of post-war globalization. Offered in summer only through Lehigh Study Abroad Office as part of Lehigh in Paris program.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 201 (ASIA 201, POLS 201) Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia 4 Credits

Theories of democracy and democratization explored in the South Asian context. Relationship of democracy to economic development and identity considered. How do historical legacies of colonialism and conflict shape contemporary outcomes.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 202 (ENGL 202, LAS 202, MLL 202) Latin American In Fact, In Fiction 4 Credits

This class couples a survey of Latin American literature in translation with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Latin America. Departing initially from readings of literary and cinematographic works, our analyses will engage methodologies from multiple disciplines including history, sociology, and cultural studies. Accordingly, this course will examine critical developments in Latin American aesthetics along with the cultural climates in which they matured. This course assumes no prior study of Spanish, Portuguese, or Latin American culture.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 221 (AAS 221, ART 221) Global Contemporary: Recent Art Movements Around the World 4 Credits

This course introduces contemporary artworks from around the world and artists that produce them. Topics include movements emerging in the last 40 years, some of which are: Revolutionary arts, Globalism, EcoArt, Postcolonial arts, phenomenological, experiential and new media arts. Global feminist projects, design/build production, graffiti and popular arts will be covered regularly. The Dakar, Venice and Säo Paulo Art Biennials as well as Documenta are explored as vectors for international artistic exchange and dissemination. Rotating case studies on the international on international built environment (e.g. : Qatar, Dubai, Singapore, Dakar) will be featured. Art Theory will be explored through iconographic, formal and contextual (political, social, financial) analysis. Movements will be situated against their historical frameworks as well as explored for their international scope and value.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 246 (JOUR 246) International Communication 4 Credits

The subject matter is crucial to understanding modern life: the role of international news media in world affairs. The class studies the social, political and economic contexts that frame the reporting of international events by U.S. news media, such as politics, war, disasters, and other crises, as well as U.S. reporting on international issues, such as poverty, disease, and environmental change. The course also surveys reporting practices in nations around the world, including the varying systems of journalism and mass media and the brutal censorship and repression facing many foreign journalists.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 247 (ASIA 247, REL 247) Islamic Mysticism 4 Credits

Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 248 (COMM 248) Global Communication 4 Credits

This class studies, from an historical and cultural perspective, how globalization shapes and is shaped by communication and media structures and processes, with special emphasis on transnational media corporations and their interaction with cultures around the globe. Topics include: globalization, media and culture; mass media and development; the flow of entertainment programs and debates on cultural imperialism; media and migration; the imbalanced flow of information in the world; the debate on the New World Information Order; and forms of resistance to transnational media from world governance institutions, such as UNESCO, state regulatory responses, and alternative media, such as citizen blogs and pirate radio.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 253 (ARCH 253, HIST 253) Paris: Plan of Metropolis 3 Credits

The splendor of modern Paris is due in large part to bold, large scale modernization and changes in the city’s patterns during the 19th century. This course, which is part of the Lehigh in Paris summer program, will cover a century of change and focus on the major accomplishments of its visionary planners.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

GS 302 (ENGL 302, LAS 302, MLL 302) Travel and Adventure in Latin American Fiction 4 Credits

Centering on a corpus of works presenting tales of travel and adventure, this class offers an overview of Latin American narrative genres (including “fantastic” narrative, magical realism, and postmodern fiction) from the mid 20th century to present day. Through close readings of works by Adolfo Bioy Casares and Roberto Bolaño, among others, and the analysis of filmic representations of travel in Latin America, we will examine differing modes of perceiving the region defined as Latin America.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 315 Seminar in Globalization and Culture 4 Credits

Advanced seminar that focuses on research and discussion of specialized topics in globalization and culture. Subjects vary by semester. Junior or senior standing and departmental Permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 318 Seminar in Globalization and Communication 4 Credits

Advanced seminar that focuses on research and discussion of specialized topics in globalization and communication. Subjects vary by semester. Junior or senior standing and departmental Permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 319 (SOC 319) The Political Economy of Globalization 4 Credits

This course studies the relationship among economic, political and cultural forces in an era of globalization. Focus is on how global capitalism, the world market and local economics shape and are shaped by social, cultural and historical forces. Topics include political and cultural determinants of trade and investment; culture and the global economy; global capitalism, especially studied through the lens of culture; globalization and patterns of economic growth; cross-cultural study of consumerism; and poverty and inequality.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 320 (ANTH 320) Global Capitalism 4 Credits

Anthropological approach to the forms and effects of global capitalism. Topics include the structure of contemporary global capitalism, including the growth of multinational corporations, flexible corporate strategies, overseas manufacturing, and global branding and marketing; the impact of global capitalism on the environment and on the lives of people in "Third World" countries; consumer culture and the diversity of non-Western consumption practices; alternative capitalist systems.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 321 (MLL 321) Intercultural Communication 4 Credits

Language is ambiguous by nature and discourse is interpreted in cultural and linguistic contexts. This course covers different cultural and linguistic strategies individuals use to communicate with each other, essential concepts for interacting with individuals from other cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and different strategies of communication as defined by specific cultures. Covering the theory and practice of intercultural interaction, this examines assumptions about language and culture, and includes practical advice to help students develop the cultural sensitivity essential for communication today.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 322 (HMS 322, SOC 322) Global Health Issues 4 Credits

Sociological dimensions of health, illness, and healing as they appear in different parts of the world. Focus on patterns of disease and mortality around the world; the relative importance of 'traditional' and 'modern' beliefs and practices with regard to disease and treatment in different societies; the organization of national health care systems in different countries; and the role of international organizations and social movements in promoting health.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 324 (AAS 324, ANTH 324) Globalization and Development in Africa 4 Credits

examines the challenges Africa presents to expectations of modernization and development. It poses these questions: Have African societies been left behind by globalization, shut out from it, or do they reflect an unexpected side of globalization processes? What is Africa’s place in the neo-liberal world order? What role does “African culture” play in generating or blocking social change? How can anthropology illuminate prospects for change on what has long been regarded as the “dark continent”?
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 325 (POLS 325) Nationalism in Comparative Perspective 4 Credits

Examination of major theoretical and policy debates in contemporary studies of nationalism. Focus on the emergence and endurance of nationalist movements in the modern era. Discussion of efforts to evaluate the legitimacy of nationalist claims and to resolve nationalist conflict.

GS 328 (SOC 328) Global Food Systems 4 Credits

Where does our food come from? How does it get to our tables? Why are there famines in some parts of the world and obesity epidemics in other parts of the world? This course will investigate these questions by focusing on food systems – the chains of social action that link food producers to food consumers. We will also explore a range of alternatives to global food systems that emphasize food democracy, security, and sustainability.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 329 (SOC 329) Global Migration 4 Credits

International migration is transforming societies at both the global and national levels, and in both origin and destination areas. Why do people move? What are the consequences of these movements? We will investigate the political and economic explanations for international migration and explore how each act of migration contributes to the trans-nationalization of social relations, alters existing livelihoods, transforms economic production and social support arrangements, and recreates racial, ethnic, and national identities.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 331 (SOC 331, WGSS 331) Gendered Experience of Globalization 4 Credits

Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 339 The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia 4 Credits

An examination of the role of Asian nationalism in the construction of the modern state form in Asia.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 342 (POLS 342, WGSS 342) Gender and Third World Development 3-4 Credits

Focus on gender implications of contemporary strategies for Third World economic growth, neo-liberalism. How do economic theories affect ‘real people?' How do economic theories affect men vs. women? What is the role of people who want to ‘help?' Some background in economic theories and/or Third World politics desired, but not required.
Prerequisites: POLS 001 or WGSS 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 343 (AAS 343, ASIA 343, POLS 343) Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa 4 Credits

An examination of the concept of “race” and its impact on domestic and international politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 348 (HIST 348) The British Empire and the Modern World 3-4 Credits

Examines the empire and its central role in the process of globalization between the 16th and 20th centuries. Topics include exploration, state-building, war, multinational corporations, industry, international finance, missionaries, racism, and independence movements.

GS 351 “The Gangs of New York” 4 Credits

The course will use the Martin Scorcese film “The Gangs of New York” as a window to examine the social economic transformations of New York City in the middle of the nineteenth century. Emphasis will be on immigration, slum gangs and street violence, politics, the Draft Riot of 1863, and the Tweed Ring. A recurrent theme will be to compare the historical record with the film’s depiction of those events. There will be a required evening showing of the film. Not available for pass/fail.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 355 (HIST 355) Destruction and Reconstruction of Europe, 1879-1950 3 Credits

An analysis of the decline and disintegration of European civilization through two world wars and Europe's reintegration in the era of the European Union. Emphasis on the development of the European state system, international conflict, and political thought.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 365 (PSYC 365) Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4 Credits

The formation of mind and personality is shaped in profound ways by the sociocultural contexts within which individuals develop. This course introduces students to basic theoretical and methodological issues and explores important examples of cross-cultural variation and diversity, using comparisons between different societies and between different subcultures within American society. Topics include cognition, language, personality, moral development, socio-emotional development, identity, attachment, and socialization. Materials drawn from anthropology, sociology and education in addition to psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 107 or PSYC 109 or PSYC 121
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 370 (ES 370, SOC 370) Globalization and the Environment 4 Credits

This course investigates globalization and the environment including how globalization has influenced society-nature relationships, as well as how environmental conditions influence the globalization processes. A key focus will be on the rapidly evolving global economic and political systems that characterize global development dynamics therefore resource use. Particular attention is paid to the role of multi-national corporations, international trade, and finance patterns and agreements. Questions related to consumption, population, global climate change, toxic wastes, and food production/distribution represent key themes.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 375 Senior Seminar in Global Studies 4 Credits

Advanced seminar with readings, in-depth discussion, and independent research. The goal of the seminar is for each student to produce a research project that might prepare him or her for the first steps after graduation. For example, students interested in global culture industries might do research on issues or organizations in that area. Students interested in human justice might do research on issues or organizations on that area.
Attribute/Distribution: ND, SS

GS 390 Readings in Global Studies 1-4 Credits

Directed course of readings for students with interests in Global Studies not fully explored in regular offerings. Junior or senior standing required. Departmental permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GS 391 Directed Research in Global Studies 1-4 Credits

Research and study for students with interests in Global Studies not fully explored in regular course offerings. Junior or senior standing required. Departmental permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 392 Internship in Global Studies 1-4 Credits

Supervised work relevant to global studies, including internships at the United Nations, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), government organizations, and other public and private agencies. Department permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

GS 394 Honors Thesis 1-4 Credits

To graduate with honors in Global Studies, students need to attain a 3.5 grade point average in Global Studies classes; a 3.5 grade point average overall, and complete 4 credits of GS 394 Honors Thesis at the time of graduation. The four credits may be taken in one semester or split over two semesters. The honors thesis is an intensive project of original research, undertaken under the direct supervision of a faculty adviser. Senior standing required. Departmental permission required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

Professor. John F. Lule, PhD (University Georgia Athens)