2017-18 Catalog

Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Program Director: Monica R. Miller, Ph.D (Chicago Theological Seminary)

Email: mrm213@lehigh.edu      Phone: 610-758-3364

Website: http://wgs.cas2.lehigh.edu/

Supported by the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs, 610-758-3996; incasip@lehigh.edu
Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive


Core Faculty

Kelly Austin, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology); Hugo Ceron-Anaya, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology); Marie-Hélène Chabut, Ph.D. (Department of Modern Languages and Literatures); Brooke DeSipio, Ph.D. (Gender Violence Education and Support); Robin Dillon, Ph.D. (Department of Philosophy); Suzanne Edwards, Ph.D. (Department of English); Jodi Eichler-Levine, Ph.D. . (Department of Religion Studies, Jewish Studies); Mary Foltz, Ph.D. (Department of English); Chelsea Fullerton, M.Ed. (Pride Center); Kashi Johnson, MFA (Department of Theatre); Rita Jones, Ph.D. (Women's Center); Jackie Krasas, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology); Danielle Lindemann, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology); Monica R. Miller, Ph.D. (Department of Religion Studies, Africana Studies); Vera Stegman, Ph.D. (Department of Modern Languages and Literatures); Nobuko Yamasaki, Ph.D. (Department of Modern Languages and Literatures); Yuping Zhang, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology)


Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) at Lehigh University is an interdisciplinary field of academic inquiry that critically examines gender and sexuality from an intersectional model that takes into account the manner in which class, race, and power co-constitutively shape and impact gendered and sexed identity construction. In the best tradition of a liberal arts education, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies encourages thinking that is critical and constructive, multifaceted and intersectional in order to redesign knowledge, and gain a better understanding of how identities shape and are shaped by the social world in which we live. Offering an undergraduate major and minor, a Graduate Certificate, and a host of faculty and student-focused events and resources, WGSS works to be a space of professional growth, intellectual development and maturity, and a knowledge leader on campus, in the surrounding Lehigh Valley, and abroad.

Undergraduate Major in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies BA will provide students an in depth education in an interdisciplinary field of academic inquiry that critically examines the diverse realities of women's lives and the ways in which gender and power differentials shape human lives and human societies. WGSS pursues a fundamental critique of knowledge by challenging the basic assumptions, methods of inquiry, theoretical frameworks, and knowledge claims of traditional fields of inquiry that have thought it unimportant to study women, gender, or sexuality. WGSS seeks to create new paradigms of knowledge and inquiry, to develop more truthful and comprehensive understandings of humans and our world, and to explore nonsexist alternatives for more richly human lives and more fully human social orders. 

Major Declaration Form

Each semester, a complete list of WGSS  course offerings can be found on the web site or in the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs, Williams Hall, Suite 101.  

The WGSS major requires 34-36 credits of coursework and is designed to complement other areas of study within CAS in order to facilitate double-majors for our students. WGSS majors can stand alone; however, many students find the major an invaluable asset as part of a double major. The major will have a core curriculum, a concentration (social sciences or humanities), electives, and a senior experience.

Major Core Courses
Major Core Courses
WGSS 001Women & Men in Society (SS)4
WGSS 350Seminar in Feminist Theory (ND)4
Global/Diversity (select one of the following) 14
Sexual Minorities (SS)
Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China (HU)
Women's Work in Global Perspectives (SS)
Anthropology of Gender (SS)
Race, Gender and Work (SS)
Women in Jewish History (HU)
African American Women Writers (HU)
Gender, Race and Sexuality: The Social Construction of Differences (SS)
Tradition and Resistance: Women Writers of Latin America (HU)
Women Writing in French (HU)
Gender and Third World Development (SS)
Inequalities at Work (SS)
Major Concentration
Students must concentrate in Social Science (SS) or Humanities (HU)8
Select two courses in SS or HU 2,3
Major Non-concentration
Select one of the following: 2,34
One SS course if HU concentration
One HU course if SS concentration
Major Electives
Select any combination of SS and HU courses 2,38
Major Senior Experience
Select one of the following:2-4
Independent Reading and Research (HU/SS)
Internship in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies (SS)
Internship in Women's Center (SS)
Senior Thesis (ND)
Total Credits34-36
1

Cannot be double-counted in categories.

2

HU or SS courses must carry the WGSS course designation or be approved by the program director. 

3

 Additional ND courses may fulfill HU or SS requirements with program director approval.  These courses may include SOAN 041 Human SexualityWGSS 091 Special Topics ,WGSS 191 Special Topics, WGSS 272 Special Topics, WGSS 291 Special Topics, WGSS 371 Special Topics, WGSS 381 Special Topics, WGSS 382 Special Topics, WGSS 391 Special Topics, WGSS 392 Special Topics and ARTS 250 Communications, Cultures, Behaviors and Attitudes

Honors in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

In order to receive honors in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the student must attain a 3.5 grade-point average in courses presented for the major and a 3.2 grade-point average overall, and must take WGSS 399 Senior Thesis and write a thesis during their senior year.

Undergraduate Minor in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The minor in WGSS engages students in the study of three interrelated subjects. The first is an examination of the cultural, historical, and social experiences and contributions of women. The second is an exploration of gender (the social construction of differential identity for males and females) and of the ways in which gender distinctions shape human consciousness and human society. The third is an examination of sex/gender and sexuality systems.

Nearly all academic disciplines have defined human nature and significant achievement in terms of male experience and have underestimated the impact of gender on social structures and human lives. By contrast, WGSS courses attend to women's diverse experiences and perspectives and acknowledge the critical significance of gender and sexuality. By shifting the focus to women, gender, and sexuality, WGSS seeks to provide an alternative paradigm for understanding human experience. Students in WGSS courses are encouraged to reevaluate traditional assumptions about human beings, human knowledge, and human culture and society, and to explore nonsexist alternatives for a more fully human social order.

Minor Declaration Form

The minor in WGSS consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours. Students pursuing the minor are required to take the introductory course (WGSS 001) and one upper-level course from among those concerned with the theory and practice of women, gender, and sexuality studies. Courses completed must include at least one course in the arts and humanities and one course in the natural and social sciences. Students arrange their program in consultation with the program director.

Undergraduate Minor

WGSS 001Women & Men in Society4
Select 2 credits from following:2
Independent Reading and Research
Internship in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Internship in Women's Center
Select one 300-level course4
Select two electives or new course as approved 18
Total Credits18
1

One course must be HU and one course must be SS

Graduate Certificate in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The Graduate Certificate in WGSS is designed as a complement to a disciplinary graduate program or as a standalone post-baccalaureate course of study. The Certificate is a small, flexible program that provides students with breadth and the challenge of working outside their home discipline in concentrated interdisciplinary study of women and gender. In recognition of contemporary educational and employment contexts that are increasingly diverse and international, the WGSS Program offers the graduate certificate as a means to enrich academic, personal, and employment horizons. A certificate in WGSS will be especially beneficial to those who wish to incorporate a broader perspective into their teaching (either in secondary or higher education), and qualifies them for positions that require such expertise. Additionally, individuals interested in fields such as social policy, human resources, and business will also gain from understanding how gender operates at individual, organizational, and institutional levels. Students will work closely with outstanding faculty from diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

Basic Requirements

WGSS 450Seminar in Feminist Theory3
Select three additional courses 1,29
Total Credits12
1

2 courses outside home department (for matriculating students)

2

No more than 6 credits at the 300-level

Admissions

Students in degree programs must be in good standing in their programs and are encouraged to apply early in their course of studies. Non-degree students must hold a bachelor's degree or equivalent with a 3.0 GPA.

Course Descriptions

In addition to these courses, new courses may be offered annually. Students should check with the director for an updated list.

Courses

WGSS 001 Women & Men in Society 4 Credits

The course introduces students to key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and interdisciplinary research in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Examines how gender interacts with race, age, class, sexuality, etc., to shape human consciousness and determine the social organization of human society. The course may include topics such as: gender and work; sexuality and reproduction; women’s health; media constructions of gender and race; gender, law, and public policy.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 015 (ASIA 015, MLL 015) Sex, War, Women, Art 4 Credits

Through the study of selected visual and literary works in their historical and social contexts, students will gain knowledge of cultures in Japan. This course examines various cultures from the perspectives of gender and sexuality as constitutive factors of Japanese society. Materials include a film depicting a romantic life of samurai, art works by contemporary artists, and writings on sex workers impacted by the Japanese empire. No prior knowledge of Japanese language is required. An introductory course taught in English.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 041 (SOAN 041) Human Sexuality 4 Credits

Sexuality and gender roles across the life cycle, including human reproduction, decision-making, and the societal regulation of sexual behavior.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

WGSS 042 (SOAN 042) Sexual Minorities 4 Credits

How minority sexual identities have been the subject of speculation, misunderstanding, and sometimes violent attempts at correction or elimination. Sexual orientation, gender role, including transvestism and "drag", transsexualism, sexism, heterosexism, and homophobia. Emphasis on critical thinking, guest speakers, and discussions.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 073 (ASIA 073, MLL 073) Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China 4 Credits

Study of the struggle for an individual “modern” identity out of traditionally defined roles for men and women as depicted by Chinese writers and filmmakers. Class, texts, and films in English. Students interested in setting up a corollary Chinese language component for credit as CHIN 371 or CHIN 251, may discuss this possibility with the professor.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 091 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 104 (ENGL 104) Special Topics in Gender Studies 4 Credits

This course will involve extended study in a sub-area of English language culture, and literature with a focus on gender, sexuality, and/or race/ethnicity. Prereq: 6 hours of freshman English.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 110 (SOC 110) Women's Work in Global Perspectives 4 Credits

This course brings to the forefront the intersections of race, class, gender, and nation with women's employment around the world. We will examine women's paid and unpaid work in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, in effort to understand the striking persistence of gender inequality over time and across the world. Topics of study include: work and family relations, women's domestic labor, factory work, and agribusiness. In addition we will explore the ways in which women have organized for changes in work and in their communities in order to conceive of possibilities for the future of women's work.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 117 (HIST 117, STS 117) Pioneering Women: Women in Science, Medicine and Engineering 4 Credits

This course analyses the careers of professional women in science, medicine and engineering, principally in the United States. It examines historical barriers to training and entry into these professions; cultural stereotypes that shape women’s options; women’s participation in innovation in their fields; their concern for work/life balance; and their contribution to clients and patients, both male and female. It focuses on three locations of professional work: the laboratory, the clinic, and the job site.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 121 (ART 121) Women in Art 4 Credits

A history of women artists from Renaissance to present day, with emphasis on artists of the 20th and 21st century from a global perspective. We explore attitudes toward women artists and their work as well as the changing role of women in art world. There may be required visits to museums and/or artists’ studios.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 123 (ANTH 123) Anthropology of Gender 4 Credits

Comparative study of the meanings and social roles associated with gender. Psychological, symbolic, and cultural approaches.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 124 (HIST 124) Women In America 4 Credits

Roles of women in American society from colonial to present times : attitudes toward women, female sexuality, women's work, and feminism.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 128 (SOC 128) Race, Gender and Work 4 Credits

Race, Gender and Work is a class designed to help students understand racial and gender inequalities as they relate specifically to work and employment. We explore the origins and histories of inequalities, the ways in which inequalities persist and/or change today, and what steps might be taken toward creating a more equal society.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 129 (DES 129, THTR 129) History of Fashion and Style 4 Credits

Dress and culture in the Western Hemisphere from prehistory to today. The evolution of silhouette, garment forms and technology. The relationship of fashion to politics, art and behavior. Cultural and environmental influences on human adornment.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 138 (JST 138, REL 138) Sex, Gender, Jews 4 Credits

How do Jews of all genders tell their stories? What are the varied Jewish approaches to sexuality? How have feminist movements affected Jewish rituals? In this course, we will consider how religion, gender, sexuality, race, and class intersect in the lives of Jews, with a particular focus on North America. Topics and will include: Jewish women’s memoirs; the voices of LGBTQ Jews; recent innovations in Jewish ritual and leadership; Jewish masculinities; and the gendering of Jewish children’s literature, among others.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 145 (AAS 145) African American Women Writers 4 Credits

Literature by African American women writers with a focus on the experiences and images of black women in the U.S. Explores the written portraits and voices of 20th century black female novelists and poets, including Hurston, Petry, Morrison, Angelou, and Walker.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 146 (PHIL 146) Philosophy of Sex and Gender 4 Credits

An examination of concepts, values, and assumptions relevant to gender and sex(uality) in our diverse society, investigating how they affect our lives in both concrete and symbolic ways. Intersections among gender, sex(uality), race, class, religion, ethnicity, etc., will be explored. Special attention will be paid to how gendered assumptions color our understandings of experiences of embodiment and emotion, reasoning and decision-making, knowledge production, and public and private relationships and activities.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 179 (POLS 179) Politics of Women 4 Credits

Selected social and political issues relating to the role of women in American society. Focuses on such questions as economics equality, poverty, and work roles, the older woman, gender gap, political leadership, reproduction technology, and sexual violence.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 182 (REL 182) Sex and Gender in the Bible 4 Credits

The Bible is often invoked—and often simplistically—as an authoritative source in contemporary discussions about the role of women and what kinds of human sexual expression is acceptable. This course will example how sex and gender are constructed in different biblical periods and biblical books. We will see that things are not nearly as simple as they are often made out to be.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 184 (REL 184) Religion, Gender, and Power 4 Credits

Gender differences as one of the basic legitimations for the unequal distribution of power in Western society. Feminist critiques of the basic social structures, cultural forms, and hierarchies of power within religious communities, and the ways in which religious groups have responded.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 191 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 226 (PHIL 226) Feminism and Philosophy 4 Credits

Analysis of the nature, sources and consequences of the oppression and exploitation of women, and justification of strategies for liberation. Topics include women's nature and human nature, sexism, femininity, sexuality, reproduction, mothering. Must have completed one HU designated course in Philosophy or one course in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 232 (ENTP 232) Gender Issues in Entrepreneurship 4 Credits

Explores role of women entrepreneurs in society & economic development; impacts of women’s entrepreneurship in different economic and cultural contexts; research on why women still represent a minority or entrepreneurs; gender differences in patterns of entrepreneurship; related policy challenges. Also addresses pragmatic and personal life choices facing women entrepreneurs, including identifying key characteristics of entrepreneurial opportunities and mapping those against values, skills, ethics and definitions of success; and planning for professional and personal development.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 271 Independent Reading and Research 1-4 Credits

Independent study of selected topics designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty. May be repeated for elective credit. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU, SS

WGSS 272 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 275 (LAS 275, SPAN 275) Introduction to Hispanic Women Writers 4 Credits

The objective of this class is to introduce students to Hispanic contemporary female authors from Latin America, Spain, and the United States through the analysis of all literary genres (novel, short story, poetry, essay, and drama). This class provides students with a solid introduction to Hispanic women's writing from the last years of the Nineteenth Century to the present, as well as to feminist literary theory.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 291 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Supervised participation in various aspects of the teaching of a course. Transcript will identify department in which apprentice teaching was performed. Consent of department chairperson and permission of the Dean. The transcript will reflect the subject area in which the teaching was done.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 303 (GERM 303, MLL 303) Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 4 Credits

This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany, Europe and America. “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Cinderella”, or “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in many forms of world literature/film. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 304 (ENGL 304) Special Topics in Gender Studies II 3,4 Credits

This course will involve extended study in a sub-area of English language, culture, and literature with a focus on gender, sexuality, and/or race/ethnicity.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 310 (AAS 310, SOC 310) Gender, Race and Sexuality: The Social Construction of Differences 4 Credits

Students will engage with current debates about the meaning and use of racial and sexual classification systems in society. We will examine the historical and sociological contexts in which specific theories of racial and sexual differences emerged in the U.S. We will also explore the ways in which changes in the images have implications on the role racial, gender, and sexual identity plays in our understanding of the relationship between difference and inequality.
Prerequisites: SOC 103 or SSP 103
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 311 (ENGL 311) Gender and Literature 3-4 Credits

Exploration of constructions of gender and sexuality in literature from different historical periods, traditions, and nationalities. How do female and male writers envision what it means to be a “woman” or to be a “man” at various moments in history and from various places around the world? How have gendered (and sexed) identities been shaped in various constraining and empowering ways in the literary imagination? What specifically gendered issues (such as love and violence) have been represented in literature? Content changes each semester.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 318 (PSYC 318) Seminar in Gender and Psychology 4 Credits

Gender as shaped by psychological and social psychological processes. Socialization, communication and power, gender stereotypes, methodological issues in sex differences research. Consent of department required.
Prerequisites: PSYC 210
Can be taken Concurrently: PSYC 210
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 325 (HIST 325, SOC 325) History of Sexuality and the Family in the U.S. 3-4 Credits

Changing conceptions of sexuality and the role of women, men, and children in the family and society from the colonial to the post-World War II era. Emphasis on the significance of socioeconomic class and cultural background. Topics include family structure, birth control, legal constraints, marriage, divorce, and prostitution.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 326 (LAS 326, SPAN 326) Tradition and Resistance: Women Writers of Latin America 4 Credits

Study of poetry and narrative works by Latin American women writers. Authors include Rosario Ferré, Rosario Castellanos, Elena Poniatowska, Cristina Peri Rossi, among others.
Prerequisites: SPAN 152
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 327 (FREN 327) Women Writing in French 4 Credits

Reading and discussion of works written by women in French. The emphasis is on 19th and 20th Century writers, such as G. Sand, Colette S. de Beauvoir, M. Duras, Andrée Chédid.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 330 Internship in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies 1-4 Credits

Supervised work in women's organizations or settings, combined with an analysis, in the form of a major paper, of the experience using the critical perspectives gained in WGSS courses. Placements arranged to suit individual interests and career goals; can include social service agencies, women's advocacy groups, political organizations, etc. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: WGSS 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 331 (GS 331, SOC 331) Gendered Experience of Globalization 4 Credits

Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 334 (HMS 334, PSYC 334) The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders 4 Credits

The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 341 (HMS 341, SOC 341) Gender and Health 4 Credits

Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity in the U.S. and around the world. Influence of medical systems on men's and women's lives and the impact of gender-based consumer health movements on health and medical care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, masculinity and health, and gender and mental health.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 342 (GS 342, POLS 342) Gender and Third World Development 3-4 Credits

Focus on gender implications of contemporary strategies for Third World economic growth, neo-liberalism. How do economic theories affect ‘real people?' How do economic theories affect men vs. women? What is the role of people who want to ‘help?' Some background in economic theories and/or Third World politics desired, but not required.
Prerequisites: POLS 001 or WGSS 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 346 (LAS 346, SPAN 346) Contemporary Hispanic Women Writers: The Novelists 4 Credits

This course explores the works of Hispanic women writers who have been oppositional to hegemonic cultural politics during the Twentieth Century in Latin America and Spain. Within their particular contexts, we examine issues these writers define as important in their work, their literary and political impact, use of literature to empower minority positions, and their narratives’ effects on the changing literary canon. Selected topics include: historical interpretations, exile, forms of violence and repression, expressions of desire, and sexuality.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 350 Seminar in Feminist Theory 4 Credits

An upper-level seminar serving as a capstone experience that challenges students to systematize insights gained from introductory and elective courses through the more deeply analytical lens of feminist theory. Consent of program director.
Prerequisites: WGSS 001
Attribute/Distribution: ND

WGSS 351 (SOC 351) Gender and Social Change 4 Credits

Changes in gender roles from social psychological and structural perspectives. Comparative analyses of men and women (including people of color) in the social structure; their attitudes and orientations toward work, family, education, and politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 364 (SOC 364) Sociology of the Family 3,4 Credits

Sociological analysis of families in the United States, including investigations of historical and contemporary patterns. Issues addressed include parenting, combining work and family, divorce and remarriage, family policies.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 365 (SOC 365) Inequalities at Work 4 Credits

Primary focus is on race, gender, and class as axes of disadvantage and privilege in work and employment. We will explore both theories and empirical studies of inequality as well as their social, political, and practical ramifications for the workplace. The course will be conducted seminar-style and the class will rely heavily on student participation.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 371 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 373 Internship On-Campus 1-3 Credits

Supervised work in on-campus student services office such as the Women's Center, the Pride Center, Office of Gender Violence, etc, allows WGSS students to bring critical perspectives on women and gender into the campus community. This course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 and consent of the Center director and WGSS director.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: WGSS 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 376 (AAS 376, COMM 376) New Media, Race and Gender 4 Credits

This class explores the relationship among race, gender and new media. It examines depictions of racial minorities and women online; how users access and use new media across race and gender (including a look at the digital divide); and differences in use of social media websites across race and gender. The goal is for students to understand how existing racial and gender categorizations are/are not transmitted to the online community and do/do not become extensions of present social hierarchy.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 381 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 382 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 391 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 392 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Intensive study of a topic of special interest not covered in other courses. May be cross-listed with relevant offerings in major department or other programs. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

WGSS 399 Senior Thesis 2-4 Credits

Research during senior year culminating in a senior thesis. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

WGSS 403 (MLL 403) Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 3 Credits

This intercultural history of the Grimms' fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany as well as Europe and America. Versions of "Little Red Riding Hood", "Cinderella", or "Sleeping Beauty" exist not only in the Grimms' collection but in films and many forms of world literature. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.

WGSS 405 (CIE 405) Experiencing the United Nations: Gender and Education in International Development 3 Credits

Building on the Lehigh University/United Nations partnership initiative, this course provides a structured practical experience for students to learn about the dynamics of UN and civil society relationships, focusing on the issues of gender and education in international development. Class activities include trips to the UN to attend NGO briefings and other events. Students develop experiences and skills in international development such as policy blogging, brief writing, and education sector analysis.

WGSS 411 (ENGL 411) Gender and Literature 3 Credits

This seminar explores constructions of gender and sexuality in literature from different historical periods, traditions, and nationalities. Content changes each semester.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 418 (SOC 418) Gendered Experience of Globalization 3 Credits

Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.

WGSS 430 Internship in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies 1-3 Credits

Internship related to women, gender, and sexuality studies. Supervised by WGSS faculty. Consent of program director required.

WGSS 441 (SOC 441) Gender and Health 3 Credits

Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity in the US and around the world. Influence of medical systems on men's and women's lives and the impact of gender-based consumer health movements on health and medical care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, masculinity and health, and gender and mental health.

WGSS 450 Seminar in Feminist Theory 3 Credits

A graduate seminar providing foundational study of multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks of women, gender, and sexuality studies.
Attribute/Distribution: HU, ND

WGSS 458 (HIST 458) Readings in Gender History 3 Credits

Study in small groups under the guidance of a faculty member on the literature of an issue, period, country or culture within gender history.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

WGSS 465 (SOC 465) Inequalities at Work 3 Credits

Primary focus is on race, gender, and class as axes of disadvantage and privilege in work and employment. We will explore both theories and empirical studies of inequality as well as their social, political, and practical ramifications for the workplace.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

WGSS 484 (PSYC 484) Psychology of Gender 3 Credits

Major theoretical approaches and empirical debates in the psychology of gender, with a focus on the interplay of nature and nurture in producing gender similarities, gender differences and gender variation in personality, social behaviors, cognitive abilities, achievement, sexuality, and mental health. Methodological issues in gender research. Consent of program director required.

WGSS 491 Independent Study 3 Credits

Individually supervised course in area of women, gender, and sexuality studies not ordinarily covered in regularly listed courses. Consent of program director required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

Associate Professors. Jacqueline Krasas, PhD (University of Southern California); Monica Najar, PhD (University Wisconsin at Madison)