2014-15 Catalog

Political Science

Richard K. Matthews, Ph.D NEH Distinguished Professor and Chair

E:mail:  rm02@lehigh.edu / Phone: 610-758-3343 / Fax:  610-758-3348

http://cas.lehigh.edu/pols

The major in political science is designed to promote understanding of political ideas, institutions and processes and to develop skills in analyzing and evaluating political problems.

A balanced program within the discipline, one that exposes the student to various areas of inquiry in political institutions and political processes as well as in the comparative and philosophical perspectives of political analysis, has been the way in which the goals of the major program generally have been achieved. While the major program outlined below will prove adequate for most student needs, it may be that some special factors such as late transfer or unusual interests and/or abilities the outlined program does not accommodate some students. In that case the students may, in consultation with their advisers, develop a major program that in their judgment will more adequately fulfill those needs.

The faculty adviser to the student majoring in political science is designated by the department. The adviser consults with the student and approves the major program. The adviser attempts to help the student relate courses offered by the department to the student’s educational goals. The adviser also may act as a resource for the student, and may suggest courses in other disciplines, language courses, and courses in research techniques that may be of benefit.

A variety of experiential opportunities are available to undergraduates majoring in political science. The department, for example, offers a Community Politics Internship every semester that includes opportunities for internship placements in either local government, private agencies or law offices. Students are also encouraged to apply for off-campus internship opportunities, e.g., American University’s Washington Semester Program and The Philadelphia Center’s Internship in Philadelphia.

Completion of the political science major is considered suitable training for the undergraduate who wishes to go on to law school, to become a social science teacher, or to work as a governmental official, party or civic leader, public affairs commentator, or staff member of a government research bureau. In addition, the business sector continues to provide opportunities in areas such as banking, insurance, and marketing for bachelor of arts graduates with training in the social sciences. Graduate study is advisable for students contemplating certain careers: college teaching, research, or public management, for example.

The three core courses are required. Individual exceptions may be made, for good reasons, by the major adviser with the approval of the department chair.

Major Requirements
POLS 001American Political System4
POLS 003Comparative Politics4
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Political Thought
Ancient Political Heritage
Modern Political Heritage
Electives
Select seven of the following with at least two courses from each of the two fields listed below: 128
American Politics, Public Law and Interdisciplinary
Introduction to Public Administration
Political Sociology
The Politics of the Environment
Global Citizenship and its Discontents
Introduction to Public Policy
Technology As Politics
Politics of Women
The Political Development of American Race Relations
Social Movements and Legacies of the 1960s
The Vietnam War in Politics, Media, and Memory
Law and Order. The Politics of Crime and Punishment
Political Parties and Elections
First Ladies and the Changing Role of Women
Comparative State Politics
Governors and Presidents
Public Policy Process
The Politics of Mental Health Policy
Nonprofit Administration
Social Entrepreneurship: How to Change the World
The American Presidency
Organizing For Democracy
U.S. Politics and the Environment
Propaganda, Media, and American Politics
Community Politics Internship
Social Psychology of Politics
Land Use, Growth Management, and the Politics of Sprawl
Constitutional Law and Politics
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
U.S. Health Care Politics
Interest Groups, Factions, and Coalitions in American Politics
U.S.Congress
Public Administration
Public Opinion Research
Political Economy
Globalization and Social Well-Being
Seminar: Green Polity
Seminar: National Social Policy
Honors Thesis In Political Science
Honors Thesis In Political Science
Political Theory and Comparative Politics
Introduction to Political Thought
Ancient Political Heritage
Modern Political Heritage
Environmental Policy and Planning
Environmental Values and Ethics
International Political Economy
Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity
Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia
Current Political Controversies
Research In Political Science
Politics Of The European Union
Politics Of Western Europe
Nationalism in Comparative Perspective
Latin American Political Systems
U.S. Foreign Policy and Latin America
Religion and Politics in Latin America
Markets, Justice, And Law
The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia
Domination
Gender and Third World Development
Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa
Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective
Environmental Justice and the Law
Seminar: Political Philosophy
Politics Of Authenticity
Issues In Contemporary Political Philosophy
American Political Thought
Seminar: The Citizen versus the Administrative State
Total Credits40
1

One of the electives may, with the consent of the department, be in a cognate field.

Political Science Minor

It takes five (5) courses to complete the political science minor. Beginning the 3rd week of the semester, a student can declare the minor. In order to declare, however, a student must have already taken, or be in the process of taking, one of POLS “core” courses (POLS 001, POLS 003 or POLS 100) AND any two other POLS courses (either “core” or elective options).

POLS 001American Political System4
POLS 003Comparative Politics4
POLS 100Introduction to Political Thought4
Select any two other POLS courses (either “core” or elective options).8
Total Credits20

Public Administration Minor

 The minor consists of:

POLS 001, POLS 103 plus four other courses chosen in consultation with the advisor for a minimum of twenty-four credits.24
Total Credits24

Political Science Honors

Students must have at least a 3.2 cumulative grade point average, and a 3.3 major grade point average, in order to proceed with departmental honors. Students with honors must complete ten courses in the major, including an independent study focusing on the honors thesis.

Master of Arts in Politics and Policy

Political Science

For Graduate Students the department offers a graduate program leading to the Master of Arts degree.  The applicant for admission is required to demonstrate adequate undergraduate preparation.

The Master of Arts in politics and policy is a 30 credit hour program that can be accomplished in 12 months by fulltime students. Students interested in enrolling on a part-time basis will be given consideration, but the expectation is that most students will complete the program in a year. Students must take ten classes with a minimum of seven classes at the 400 level. The normal path would be at least two 400-level courses each semester and two over the summer. Students must take Introduction to Politics and Policy, one methodology course, and one course with a normative component. With the approval of the department DGS, students may take graduate level courses outside of the Department of Political Science.

Community Fellows Program

Students interested in state or local public service or nonprofit work may also elect to apply to the Community Fellows program in which the student works for 15 hours per week for a local non-profit organization on a project related to community (re)development. For more information on the Community Fellows program, please see the program website www.lehigh.edu/communityfellows.

Graduate students will be required to write a major paper (one semester) or a Master’s thesis (two semesters) that will be defended before a panel of faculty members. Those participating in the Community Fellows program will be required to write a paper summarizing and analyzing their community fellows experience.

The Master of Arts program is intended for high-achieving students with a social science and liberal arts background who have a keen interest in the study of politics and/or are interested in the Community Fellows program and related experiential learning opportunities. The Master of Arts prepares students for further study in political science, public policy, or the law as well as careers in business, public service, or nonprofit organizations.

Courses

POLS 001 American Political System 4 Credits

Constitutional principles; organization and operation of the national government; and dynamics of power within the U.S. political system.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 003 (GS 003) Comparative Politics 4 Credits

The political systems of foreign countries; approaches to the study of comparative politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 100 (GS 100, PHIL 100) Introduction to Political Thought 4 Credits

A critical examination of political ideologies: Liberalism, Marxism, Fascism, and Islamism.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 101 Ancient Political Heritage 4 Credits

Important political thinkers from the pre-Socratics to early, modern political theorists like Machiavelli.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 102 Modern Political Heritage 4 Credits

Begins where POLS 101 ends: from early, modern theorists (e.g., Hobbes) up to contemporary thinkers (e.g., Marcuse).
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 103 Introduction to Public Administration 4 Credits

This course presents the intellectual history of the study of public administration in a manner that is intended to inform career choices for those who might consider public service and provide a broad introduction to the field of public administration. Students will gain a comprehensive perspective on the public administration discipline by exploring the pervasive puzzles, ethical dilemmas, and the critical issues in governance to date.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 104 (SSP 104) Political Sociology 4 Credits

An introduction to political sociology through an examination of the major sociological questions concerning power, politics, and the state. Covers historical questions concerning state formation, nationalism, social movements, globalization, political culture and participation, and civil society. Includes examples such as racism, welfare reform, campaign financing, coal mining in Appalachia, revolution in Latin America, and the rise of the Nazi party in Germany, and the place of the United States in a global society.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 105 (ES 105) Environmental Policy and Planning 4 Credits

Analysis of the framework that has been established to protect the environment and promote sustainable growth. Focus on the roles of the different branches of the U.S. government and the relative responsibilities of state and local governments within this framework. Consideration of the political nature of environmental issues and the social forces influencing environmental protection in different areas of domestic environmental policy, such as climate change, toxic waste disposal, and natural resources conservation.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 106 (ES 106) Environmental Values and Ethics 4 Credits

An introduction to the ethical perspectives and values that shape human relationships to the natural environment in contemporary society. What are the moral implications of these relationships for justice and human collective action? Given these implications, what policy responses to environmental problems are morally or politically justifiable? In answering these questions, the course explores ethical ideas developed in different schools of environmental thought, such as deep ecology and ecofeminism, in addition to ideas that emerge from social movements, such as environmental justice and bioregionalism.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 107 (ES 107) The Politics of the Environment 4 Credits

A survey of the major environmental, resource, energy and population problems of modern society, focusing on the United States. The politics of man’s relationship with nature, the political problems of ecological scarcity and public goods, and the response of the American political system to environmental issues.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 108 Global Citizenship and its Discontents 4 Credits

The purpose of the course is to consider the nature-and desirability-of citizenship, both as an ideal and as applied (if possible) in the global context. What exactly does it mean to be a “citizen?” Does citizenship require particular actions, thoughts, or values? What are the legal, political, and moral obligations of this designation? What exactly do you owe to your neighbor, or to someone on the other side of the world? Readings range from Socrates to the Manefesto of the Unabomber.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 109 Introduction to Public Policy 4 Credits

Introduces students to the basic theories, principles, institutions, and processes of public policy in the U.S. The objectives are to provide students with an understanding of how social problems are defined, how potential solutions to those problems move through the policy process, and gain an empirical perspective on the consequences, as well as insight regarding the normative dimensions of policy making. Students will develop knowledge of the framework for understanding policy and engage in critical thinking regarding the nature of policy.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 115 Technology As Politics 4 Credits

Relationship of technology and technological change with politics and public policy. Review of theories of political significance of technology, including technological determinism, technology assessment, technological progress and appropriate technology. Specific issues in technology with emphasis on U.S.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 125 (IR 125) International Political Economy 4 Credits

Principles governing the interaction between the economic and political components of international phenomena. Political aspects of trade, investment, and global economic order. Political underpinnings of international economic relations. Domestic and international political consequences of economic policy and international economic relations.
Prerequisites: IR 010 and ECO 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 133 (AAS 133, FREN 133, HIST 133, LAS 133, MLL 133) Lehigh in Martinique: Globalization and Local Identity 3,4 Credits

History, culture, and politics of the French Caribbean island of Martinique, from its position as a key site of the 18th century Atlantic World economy to becoming an official French department and outpost of the European Union. Interdisciplinary perspectives on the complex nature of social identity, historical memory and impact of globalization. No French is required. Offered during winter inter-term through Lehigh Study Abroad.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

POLS 179 (WGSS 179) Politics of Women 4 Credits

Selected social and political issues relating to the role of women in American society. Focuses on such questions as economic equality, poverty, and work roles, the older woman, gender gap, political leadership, reproduction technology, and sexual violence.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 201 (ASIA 201, GS 201) Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia 4 Credits

Theories of democracy and democratization explored in the South Asian context. Relationship of democracy to economic development and identity considered. How do historical legacies of colonialism and conflict shape contemporary outcomes.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 205 (AAS 205) The Political Development of American Race Relations 4 Credits

This course examines the distinctive role race has played in shaping the political history of the United States.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 230 (AAS 230) Social Movements and Legacies of the 1960s 4 Credits

The lessons and legacies of 1960s social and political movements. Students examine civil rights, black power movements, the New Left, campus protests, the Vietnam war and antiwar movement, the counterculture, women’s and ecology movements and assess their connection to democracy, today’s world and their own lives.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 232 The Vietnam War in Politics, Media, and Memory 4 Credits

Examines the meaning of the American war in Vietnam as interpreted and disputed in American politics, the mass media, and private and public memory. Reviews the political history and context of the war, personal experiences and critical perspectives on the war, and characterizations of the war in mainstream news media and popular film.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 240 Law and Order. The Politics of Crime and Punishment 4 Credits

This course explores the legal and political consequences of various theories of crime, punishment and social control in the United States. Topics include policing, racial profiling, trial court proceedings and the administration of justice, growing incarceration rates and the prison industry, capital punishment, the jury system, and the nature of legal obligation.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 274 Political Parties and Elections 4 Credits

Study of the organization, functions and behavior of political parties in the United States. Includes voting behavior, campaigns and elections, polling, interest groups, public opinion and the role of the media.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 282 First Ladies and the Changing Role of Women 4 Credits

The role of presidential wives since Martha Washington first held the position will be examined with particular attention focused on the decades since 1932, beginning with Eleanor Roosevelt.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

POLS 301 Current Political Controversies 4 Credits

Selected topical policy issues and alternative approaches to understanding them. Includes the major domestic questions facing the U.S. Emphasis is on debating the current issues of the day.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 302 Comparative State Politics 4 Credits

Analysis of major questions relating to the role of the states in the American federal system and their relationship with the national government.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 304 Governors and Presidents 4 Credits

From the statehouse to the White House, American executive power has become one of the defining features of American politics. This course will examine the growth of that authority and its effect on public policy over the past 100 years. We will explore key figures and eras in American political history and the role governors and presidents have played in reshaping the locus of power in public affairs.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 306 Public Policy Process 3-4 Credits

Power relations and their impacts on selected public policy issues, specifically taxation, housing, environment, poverty, energy, the military, and health.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 307 The Politics of Mental Health Policy 4 Credits

What is normal behavior, and how do we come to understand mental illness? How do the resulting policies, to address mental health, impact society? This course is designed to facilitate thoughtful discourse on the various ways in which society regulates access to opportunities, facilitates integration or alienation, and constructs the social world.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 309 (ENTP 309) Nonprofit Administration 4 Credits

This course will address key questions in nonprofit sector research, policy, and management and familiarize students with factors that tend to make the nonprofit sector distinct. Students will gain an understanding of the scope and character of nonprofit activity in the U.S. and abroad. We will explore current debates in nonprofit policy and evaluate critical challenges facing the organization and management of nonprofits.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 310 (ENTP 310) Social Entrepreneurship: How to Change the World 4 Credits

The marketplace does not always have to be harsh. Social entrepreneurship uses market-based approaches to address needs and solve problems in our society. Students in this seminar-style course will learn how to identify community problems, convince the community that it is a problem worth solving, design the response, and implement it. Hands-on projects. Must have at least junior standing or consent of the minor director.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 317 The American Presidency 3-4 Credits

Role of the executive in the American political process. Includes an analysis of the historical development, selection process, and scope of executive power. Emphasizes domestic and foreign policy initiatives of selected presidents from FDR to today.
Prerequisites: (POLS 001)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 321 Research In Political Science 4 Credits

Models in the explanation of political phenomena, appropriateness of measurement techniques; construction of research designs; rationale and application of statistical analyses; individual projects involving the construction and testing of models employing a major social science data set. Consent of instructor required.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 323 Politics Of The European Union 4 Credits

The institutions and policy-making processes of the European Union. Topics include the creation of the single market and the euro, environmental and agricultural policy, regional development and the policy challenges of eastward enlargement.
Prerequisites: POLS 003 or IR 010
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 324 Politics Of Western Europe 3,4 Credits

Comparative discussion of systems of government in Western Europe and of major policy questions facing these states in the post-war era. Topics include the evolution of social welfare systems, the impact of economic crises and globalization on Western European political economy, and immigration and identity politics.
Prerequisites: POLS 003
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 325 (GS 325) Nationalism in Comparative Perspective 3,4 Credits

Examination of major theoretical and policy debates in contemporary studies of nationalism. Focus on the emergence and endurance of nationalist movements in the modern era. Discussion of efforts to evaluate the legitimacy of nationalist claims and to resolve nationalist conflict.
Prerequisites: POLS 003
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 326 Organizing For Democracy 3-4 Credits

Seminar on the theory and practice of community and political organizing and their relationship with democracy and power in the United States, complementing semester-long student field placements with community groups and local organizations. Student teams help enhance the political voice of under-resourced community groups through organization-building, outreach, and policy input at the local level. Consent of instructor required.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 328 (ES 328) U.S. Politics and the Environment 4 Credits

An examination of contemporary American politics and policy dealing with environmental issues. Current controversies in the legislative and regulatory areas will be covered to examine environmental issues and the political process. Significant portions of the course readings will be taken from government publications.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 329 Propaganda, Media, and American Politics 3-4 Credits

The role of propaganda and mass media in sustaining hegemony in the United States. Emphasis on television, advertising and mass culture, public relations, news media, and political propaganda pertaining to U.S. foreign and domestic policy. Students compare critical counter-hegemonic theories to political speeches, documents, news reports, and media encounters that shape much of American political life.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 331 Community Politics Internship 4 Credits

Integrated fieldwork and academic study. Seminar, research paper, and journal; internship with government and social service agencies, political groups, elected officials, and law offices. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 333 Social Psychology of Politics 4 Credits

Political behavior viewed from a psychological and social psychological perspective.
Prerequisites: (ANTH 001 or SSP 001 or PSYC 001)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 335 Latin American Political Systems 4 Credits

Democratic, authoritarian and revolutionary paths to contemporary political issues. Political, economic and social implications of contemporary “democratic” regimes and neo-liberal economic policies. Discussion groups and student presentations on prospects for democratic peace and prosperity in the future.
Prerequisites: (POLS 003)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 336 U.S. Foreign Policy and Latin America 3-4 Credits

U.S. historical relationship with Central America, Caribbean and South America with emphasis on economic and military dominance. Contemporary issues such as U.S. invasions of Panama and Grenada, U.S. Cuban relations, the militarization of the “drug war,” counter-insurgency. Written analysis of competing U.S. interests across time and regions.
Prerequisites: (POLS 003)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 337 Religion and Politics in Latin America 4 Credits

Indigenous and “imported” religious structures, the prominent role of the Catholic Church in Latin America, and the recent explosion of Protestant/ Pentecostal churches. Emphasis on the intersection of religious belief and power (i.e., gender, local politics, national development, etc.). Short papers integrate material with students’ knowledge of religious/political phenomena. Discussion groups analyze philosophical foundations of belief.
Prerequisites: (POLS 003 and POLS 336)
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 338 Markets, Justice, And Law 3,4 Credits

The exploration of the various ways in which markets shape cultural, social, ethical, and political practices in contemporary society. Normative justification for market as an institutional arrangement that is neutral between different views of “the good”. Ethical critique of this normative justification and implications of the critique for law and policy.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 339 (ASIA 339) The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia 4 Credits

An examination of the role of Asian nationalism in the construction of the modern state form in Asia.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 340 Domination 4 Credits

Is hierarchy in human societies inevitable? How do we make sense of justice and equality if domination is an inescapable aspect of the social world? Our consideration of these questions will draw on a wide range of literatures including primatology, political philosophy, anthropology, and gender studies. We will also use non-academic sources such as films and novels to explore the world of domination and resistance.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 342 (GS 342, WGSS 342) Gender and Third World Development 3-4 Credits

Focus on gender implications of contemporary strategies for Third World economic growth, neo-liberalism. How do economic theories affect ‘real people?’ How do economic theories affect men vs. women? What is the role of people who want to ‘help?’ Some background in economic theories and/or Third World politics desired, but not required.
Prerequisites: POLS 001 or WGSS 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 343 (AAS 343, ASIA 343, GS 343) Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa 4 Credits

An examination of the concept of “race” and its impact on domestic and international politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 348 Land Use, Growth Management, and the Politics of Sprawl 3-4 Credits

An intro to the issues of Land Use Planning, Community, Growth Mgmt, & Sprawl. Will examine the history of urban development in America, from the earliest settlements to the auto suburbs. Also explore such planning & development factors as comprehensive plans, zoning, & the influence of infrastructure on development. Concludes with an assessment of the revival of city centers, alternatives to sprawl, & comparisons to development patterns in other countries.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 350 Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective 4 Credits

This research seminar attempts to identify the conditions under which religious parties arise and become influential, how religion influences popular understandings of secular politics and the extent to which religion is a necessary feature of modern public discourse. These topics are explored through country specific cases from around the world.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 351 Constitutional Law and Politics 4 Credits

Exploration of the process of legal reasoning, the place of the United States Supreme Court in the American political system, the multiple influences on judicial decision-making, and various interpretive debates over the meaning of the U.S. Constitution. Following this introduction to the interplay of law and politics, the focus turns to particular domains within the canon of constitutional law, including cases pertaining to the Supreme Court’s jurisdiction and capacity; the separation of powers between the three branches of government; federalism (federal-state-local relations); the “takings” clause; election law; the powers of Congress; “police powers” at the state level; and, foreign affairs and constitutional crises. POLS 001 is strongly recommended.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 352 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 3-4 Credits

A continuation of themes, issues, and debates of the previous semester (POLS 351). This course addresses the major cases and controversies within several legal domains, including the freedoms of and from religion; freedom of speech; freedom of association; freedom of the press; the right to bear arms; the rights of criminal defendants and suspects; the right to privacy; capital punishment; and, the equal protection of the law.
Prerequisites: POLS 351
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 354 (HMS 354) U.S. Health Care Politics 4 Credits

Health care programs, policies, and their impact on American society. Topics include approaches to health care; public sector plans (Medicare and Medicaid); managed care; the employer-sponsored system; medically uninsured; vested interests and lobbyists; movements for national health care; and options for change.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 355 (ES 355) Environmental Justice and the Law 4 Credits

This course explores the various ways in which environmental law and policy can have discriminatory effects. It examines the rise and evolution of environmental justice movement, and the impact of environmental justice claims on administrative rule making at state and federal level. Reviewing the history of case law concerning environmental justice suits filed under the 1964 Civil Rights Act, it also examines the future of environmental justice in environmental law and policy.
Prerequisites: POLS 105 or ES 105
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 356 Seminar: Political Philosophy 3-4 Credits

Critical examination of several of the “great books” and/or “great ideas” in political thought. Students will help select the material for critical discussion.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 357 Politics Of Authenticity 4 Credits

Works in political philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, literature, and film that discuss knowing and being one’s self will be critically discussed. If you feel a life of “quiet desperation” is inevitable, this course is for you.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 358 Interest Groups, Factions, and Coalitions in American Politics 4 Credits

The rise of interest group power. Social, economic, and political reasons for groups’ increasing influence. Value of different group resources and influence in particular national policy arenas. Types of more, and less, powerful interests, and the implications of this distribution of power for American politics.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 359 U.S.Congress 3-4 Credits

Elections for the House and Senate and their significance for the way in which Congress functions. The formal structure of party leadership and committees, House and Senate organizational and functional differences, and informal and formal power of legislation and oversight. Congressional relations with the president, bureaucracy, and Supreme Court.
Prerequisites: POLS 001
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 360 Public Administration 3-4 Credits

The nature of administration; problems of organization and management; public personnel policies; budgeting and budgetary system; forms of administrative responsibility.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 363 Public Opinion Research 4 Credits

This course examines fundamental processes and tools employed in public opinion research. This class is designed to provide students with the ability to develop, implement and evaluate various forms of public opinion research including surveys, focus groups and individual interviews.Students will be introduced to numerous aspects of public opinion research including questionnaire design, sampling, interviewing, data analysis, focus group moderation, and varied forms of data collection.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 364 (PHIL 364) Issues In Contemporary Political Philosophy 3-4 Credits

Selected topics in contemporary political philosophy, such as the Frankfurt school, existentialism, legitimation, authenticity, participatory democracy, and the alleged decline of political philosophy. May be repeated for credit with the consent of instructor.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 367 (PHIL 367) American Political Thought 3-4 Credits

A critical examination of American political thought from the founding of the Republic to the present. Writings from Madison, Hamilton, and Jefferson to Emma Goldman, Mary Daly, Malcolm X, Henry Kariel, and others will be discussed.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 368 Political Economy 3-4 Credits

Relationship of democratic politics to government and market, and significance of economic power in the American polity. Economic rationale for the place of the market and economic institutions in polity. Emphasis on information in comparison of economic approaches to public policy and organization (public goods, market failure, and collective action) with traditional political science approaches (group mobilization and conflict, non-decisions and symbolic action).
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 370 Seminar: The Citizen versus the Administrative State 4 Credits

Administrative power and policy. Constitutional and judicial control of administration. Remedies against improper administrative acts. Major emphasis will be on the United States, with some attention given to analogous issues in other countries.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 373 Globalization and Social Well-Being 4 Credits

This course examines how the various dimensions of globalization impact people by exploring factors that reflect and affect quality of life. Students will gain an understanding of the complexities resulting from the growing interconnectedness and interdependencies of global relations. The course is intended to get people thinking creatively about opportunities for connections that preserve human dignity.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 375 (ES 375) Seminar: Green Polity 4 Credits

Development of guidelines and applications for public policy and political action directed toward environmental sustainability and political feasibility. Focus on problem-solving and policy design, connecting sustainable environmental goals with workable and responsive institutional designs.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 376 Seminar: National Social Policy 3-4 Credits

A readings/research seminar on current social policy questions. analyzes, from alternatives political perspectives, such issues as Social Security, Medicare, health care, welfare reform, income inequality, and taxation. Students research a specific social issue of their choice. Class discussion on individual research and common readings.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

POLS 378 Honors Thesis In Political Science 1-4 Credits

Opportunity for undergraduate majors in Political Science to pursue an extended project for senior honors. Department permission required.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 379 Honors Thesis In Political Science 4 Credits

Continuation of POLS 378. Consent of department required.
Prerequisites: POLS 378
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 381 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

A seminar on a topic of special interest in a particular political institution, process, or policy. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 382 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

A seminar on a topic of special interest in a particular political institution, process, or policy. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

POLS 401 Introduction to Politics and Policy 3 Credits

Structured around a generative theme, such as inequality and justice, or community and the environment, each faculty member will discuss this issue from the perspective of his/her specialty.

POLS 402 Methods Of Policy Analysis 3 Credits

Approaches or models used to analyze public policy. Assumptions underlying each model and critiques of each; may include a number of the following approaches: institutional, process, rational, group, incremental, and/or elite.

POLS 403 Creativity, Ideas, and Methods in Political Science 3 Credits

Explores the challenges and creative possibilities of turning ‘research interests’ into doable research projects – such as research papers, MA theses, or doctoral dissertations. Discusses the domains of qualitative methodology and how social scientists seek to understand, represent, and analyze the social world. Topics: the politics of interpretation, observation, and quantification in social research, and critiques of assumptions about power and causality.

POLS 404 Environmental Valuation: Policy Design/Legal Analysis 3 Credits

Review of the “contingent valuation method” for pricing environmental resources. Assessment of the empirical and normative strengths and weakness of this method. Evaluation of the recent turn to “deliberative” methods of resource valuation. Consideration of empirical and normative problems and common problems that challenge resource valuation.

POLS 407 The Politics of Mental Health Policy 3 Credits

What is normal behavior, and how do we come to understand mental illness? How do the resulting policies, to address mental health, impact society? This course is designed to facilitate thoughtful discourse on the various ways in which society regulates access to opportunities, facilitates integration or alienation, and constructs the social world.

POLS 408 American Politics Core 3 Credits

A survey of American politics utilizing readings reflecting a variety of methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives. Readings include but are not limited to works widely regarded as “classics” in American political science.

POLS 409 Nonprofit Administration 3 Credits

This course will address key questions in nonprofit sector research, policy, and management and familiarize students with factors that tend to make the nonprofit sector distinct. Students will gain an understanding of the scope and character of nonprofit activity in the U.S. and abroad. We will explore current debates in nonprofit policy and evaluate critical challenges facing the organization and management of nonprofits.

POLS 413 Modern Political Philosophy 3 Credits

A study of selected modern political philosophers and their continuing effect on politics and political philosophy.

POLS 415 State and Local Government 3 Credits

Comparative state government, urban politics, intergovernmental relations, regional and local government.

POLS 416 American Environmental Policy 3 Credits

Formation, implementation and impact of environmental policies in the U.S. An examination of the scope of environmental problems, the development of environment as an issue, the role of interest groups and public opinion, the policy-making process, and the various approaches to implementing environmental policy. Special attention to current issues and administrative approaches and to the distinctive character of environmental protection as a political issue.

POLS 421 Research Methods 3 Credits

Models in the explanation of political phenomena, appropriateness of measurement techniques; construction of research designs; rationale and application of statistical analyses; individual projects involving the construction and testing of models employing a major social science data set.

POLS 423 Politics Of The European Union 3 Credits

The institutions and policy-making processes of the EU. Topics include the creation of the single market and the euro, environmental and agricultural policy, regional development and the policy challenges of eastward enlargement.

POLS 425 Nationalism in Comparative Perspective 3 Credits

Examination of major theoretical and policy debates in contemporary studies of nationalism. Focus on the emergence and endurance of nationalist movements in the modern era. Discussion of efforts to evaluate the legitimacy of nationalist claims and to resolve nationalist conflict.

POLS 426 Organizing For Democracy 3 Credits

Seminar on the theory and practice of community and political organizing and their relationship with democracy and power in the United States, complementing semester-long student field placements with community groups and local organizations. Student teams help enhance the political voice of under-resourced community groups through organization-building, outreach, and policy input at the local level. Consent of instructor required.

POLS 427 American Democracy: Decline or Revival? 3 Credits

Theories of democracy, analysis of its decline, and possible scenarios for a revived democratic culture. Research projects on topics of personal interest; class participation in hands-on project in local democracy-building.

POLS 428 Media & Democracy 3 Credits

General & theoretical considerations about democracy, the political economy of the mass media, and analysis of ways in which the media influence political discourse in the United States and globalized media culture. Hands-on analysis of media samples: news coverage, political advertising, public relations advertising, and interactive learning on how group might utilize the media to express its voice effectively.

POLS 429 Propaganda, Media & American Politics 3 Credits

The role of propaganda and mass media in sustaining hegemony in the United States. Emphasis on television, advertising and mass culture, public relations, news media, and political propaganda pertaining to U.S. foreign and domestic policy. Students compare critical, counter-hegemonic theories to political speeches, documents, news reports, and media encounters that shape much of American political life.

POLS 430 Social Movements & Legacies of 1960s 3 Credits

The lessons and legacies of 1960s social and political movements. Students examine civil rights, black power movements, the New Left, campus protests, the Vietnam war and antiwar movement, the counterculture, women’s and ecology movements and assess their connection to democracy, today’s world, and their own lives.

POLS 431 (ES 431) Public Management 3 Credits

The study of bureaucracy and problems of public and nonprofit organization and management; executive leadership; personnel management systems and regulatory administration.

POLS 433 The Politics Of Health Care 3 Credits

Examines the politics of American health care and its impact on society. Issues ranging from the role of the private sector to government-supported programs; focus on ways to restructure the system, based on alternatives in selected nations.

POLS 435 Power, Persuasion and the American Presidency 3 Credits

Examination of selected modern presidents, from FDR to the current occupant of the White House, and their effectiveness as communicators and policy makers.

POLS 438 Markets, Justice, And Law 3 Credits

The exploration of the various ways in which markets shape cultural, social, ethical, and political practices in contemporary society. Normative justification for market as an institutional arrangement that is neutral between different views of “the good”. Ethical critique of this normative justification and implications of the critique for law and policy.

POLS 439 The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia 3 Credits

An examination of the role of Asian nationalism in the construction of the modern state form in Asia.

POLS 440 Domination 3 Credits

Is hierarchy in human societies inevitable? How do we make sense of justice and equality if domination is an inescapable aspect of the social world? Our consideration of these questions will draw on a wide range of literatures including primatology, political philosophy, anthropology, and gender studies. We will also use non-academic sources such as films and novels to explore the world of domination and resistance.

POLS 443 Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa 3 Credits

An examination of the concept of “race” and its impact on domestic and international politics.

POLS 448 (HIST 448) Land Use, Growth Management, and the Politics of Sprawl 3 Credits

An intro to the issues of Land Use Planning, Community, Growth Mgmt, & Sprawl. Will examine the history of urban development in America, from the earliest settlements to the auto suburbs. Also explore such planning & development factors as comprehensive plans, zoning, & the influence of infrastructure on development. Concludes with an assessment of the revival of city centers, alternatives to sprawl, & comparisons to development patterns in other countries.

POLS 450 Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective 3 Credits

This research seminar attempts to identify the conditions under which religious parties arise and become influential, how religion influences popular understandings of secular politics and the extent to which religion is a necessary feature of modern public discourse. These topics are explored through country specific cases from around the world.

POLS 451 Comparative Politics Core 3 Credits

Discussion of major recent works in comparative politics that exemplify on-going substantive debates and methodological problems in the field. Topics: state-building and the construction of social order, institutions, political economy, democracy, development, and political mobilization.

POLS 452 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 3 Credits

A continuation of themes, issues, and debates of the previous semester (POLS 351). This course addresses the major cases and controversies within several legal domains, including the freedoms of and from religion; freedom of speech; freedom of association; freedom of the press; the right to bear arms; the rights of criminal defendants and suspects; the right to privacy; capital punishment; and, the equal protection of the law.

POLS 453 Seminar: Media, Propaganda and Democracy 3 Credits

Research seminar on theoretical and applied issues related to democracy vs. political hegemony, as affected by propaganda, the mass media, popular culture, and the capitalist economy. Students will pursue individual research topics linked to common class readings. Weekly paper presentations and critical responses.

POLS 454 The State in Asia 3 Credits

Examination of state-directed political, economic and social development in and among Asian states, with an addition focus on the relationships between the domestic policies of various Asian states and relations with non-Asian states.

POLS 455 (ES 455) Environmental Justice & The Law 3 Credits

This course explores the various ways in which environmental law and policy can have discriminatory effects. It examines the rise and evolution of environmental justice movement, and the impact of environmental justice claims on administrative rule making at state and federal level. Reviewing the history of case law concerning environmental justice suits filed under the 1964 Civil Rights Act, it also examines the future of environmental justice in environmental law and policy.

POLS 456 Seminar: Political Philosophy 3 Credits

Critical examination of several of the “great books” and/or “great ideas” in political thought.

POLS 457 Politics Of Authenticity 3 Credits

Works in political philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, literature, and film that discuss knowing and being one’s self will be critically discussed. If you feel a life of “quiet desperation” is inevitable, this course is for you.

POLS 462 Seminar: American Political Thought 3 Credits

Focus on a narrow topic or theorist in the field, e.g., the work of Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, or Tocqueville. Students will be required to write a major paper and present it to the class.

POLS 463 Public Opinion Research 3 Credits

This course examines fundamental processes and tools employed in public opinion research. This class is designed to provide students with the ability to develop, implement and evaluate various forms of public opinion research including surveys, focus groups and individual interviews. Students will be introduced to numerous aspects of public opinion research including questionnaire design, sampling, interviewing, data analysis, focus group moderation, and varied forms of data collection.

POLS 464 Community Fellowship I 3 Credits

15 hours/week in regional agency on specific project relating to regional redevelopment with regularly scheduled contact hours with the faculty advisor.

POLS 465 Community Fellowship II 3 Credits

15 hours/week in regional agency on specific project relating to regional redevelopment with regularly scheduled contact hours with the faculty advisor.

POLS 467 Legal Problems 3 Credits

This course involves an examination of the role of legal rules, agents, institutions, and values in our society. Primary emphasis will be given to the American legal system, though we will evaluate U.S. principles and politics through a comparative lens as well.

POLS 468 Political Economy 3 Credits

Relationship of democratic politics to government and market, and significance of economic power in the American polity. Economic rationale for the place of the market and economic institutions in polity. Emphasis on information in comparison of economic approaches to public policy and organization (public goods, market failure and collective action) with traditional political science approaches (group mobilization and conflict, non-decisions and symbolic actions.

POLS 473 Globalization and Social Well-Being 3 Credits

This course examines how the various dimensions of globalization impact people by exploring factors that reflect and affect quality of life. Students will gain an understanding of the complexities resulting from the growing interconnectedness and interdependencies of global relations. The course is intended to get people thinking creatively about opportunities for connections that preserve human dignity.

POLS 475 (ES 475) Seminar: Green Polity 3-4 Credits

Development of guidelines and applications for public policy and political action directed toward environmental sustainability and political feasibility. Focus on problem-solving and policy design, connecting sustainable environmental goals with workable and responsive institutional designs.

POLS 477 (SSP 477) Advanced Computer Applications 3 Credits

Uses of computers in social sciences, including data collection, management, analysis, presentation, and decision-making; includes weekly lab.

POLS 481 Special Topics 1-3 Credits

Individual inquiry into some problem of government. Reading, field work, and other appropriate techniques of investigation. Conferences and reports.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

POLS 482 Special Topics 1-3 Credits

Continuation of POLS 481.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

POLS 490 Thesis 1-6 Credits

Professors. Richard K. Matthews, PhD (University of Toronto); Edward P. Morgan, PhD (Brandeis University); Laura K Olson, PhD (University of Colorado Boulder)

Associate Professors. Saladin M. Ambar, PhD (Rutgers University); Frank L. Davis, PhD (University of North Carolina); Vera L. Fennell, PhD (University of Chicago); Breena Holland, PhD (University of Chicago); Jennifer M. Jensen, PhD (University of North Carolina); Janet M. Laible, PhD (Yale University); Albert H. Wurth, Jr., PhD (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill)

Assistant Professors. Nandini Deo, PhD (Yale University); Holona L. Ochs, PhD (University of Kansas)

Professor Of Practice. Mark Orrs, MPhil (Columbia University)

Emeriti. Dave Curtis Amidon, Jr., MA (The Pennsylvania State University); Donald D. Barry, PhD (Syracuse University); Howard R. Whitcomb, PhD (Suny College Albany); W. Ross Yates, PhD (Yale University)