2021-22 Catalog

Bioengineering

Bioengineering is a broad and rapidly evolving field. At the core of its varied options is the goal of advancing human health through scientific discovery and through the development of new biomedical technologies. The Bioengineering Department at Lehigh offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Bioengineering, as well as two undergraduate programs, a Bachelor of Science degree in Bioengineering and a Bachelor of Science degree in Biocomputational Engineering.

OUR MISSION

The mission of the Bioengineering Department at Lehigh University is to prepare students to be critical thinkers, problem solvers, innovators, leaders, and life-long learners in the field of Bioengineering. We aim to produce ground-breaking research and new knowledge at the interface of the physical and life sciences, and engineering.

OVERVIEW

As the newest engineering department at Lehigh, we hold true to the Lehigh tradition of world-class excellence in education and research.  We accomplish this with outstanding and dedicated faculty members, a vibrant curriculum, state of the art technologies, and a highly integrative and interdisciplinary, research-driven focus.

Lehigh's graduate program in Bioengineering trains students to combine life and physical sciences and engineering to develop effective and affordable solutions for health care and biotechnology problems. We offer diverse opportunities for advanced studies in areas such as biomaterials, computational bioengineering, biomechanics, optics, nanotechnology, biosensors, biophotonics and bioelectronics. Key research themes are (1) Biocomputations and Modeling, (2) Diagnostics, Sensors, and Devices, and (3) Materials and Therapies. Our graduate students are an integral part of this active and multi-disciplinary research environment.

Our undergraduate curriculum in Bioengineering fuses comprehensive fundamentals in engineering and physical sciences, such as fluid mechanics, physics, chemistry and thermodynamics, with a focus on biological systems and bioengineering applications – and then combines it with valuable hands-on, experiential learning opportunities. The result is a rigorous training regimen that prepares our students to be at the forefront of established and emerging fields such as pharmaceuticals, biomaterials, healthcare, bioelectronics, biomedicine and other biotechnology-related industries.

Lehigh is among the first handful of universities offering an undergraduate degree in Biocomputational Engineering. The undergraduate curriculum in this major provides students a foundation in the basic sciences, mathematics, and computer programming, as well as a rigorous core of interdisciplinary engineering coursework, including subjects such as bioinformatics, machine learning, and signaling in biological systems. The program will equip students to develop new diagnostic tools and software, model the building blocks of life, identify populations at risk of diseases, shore up health care data acquisition methods and security, and design clinical research trials, among other and not-yet-conceived applications.

For more information, please visit our website: http://www.lehigh.edu/bioe/

Undergraduate programs

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

The Bioengineering Department has established the following set of Program Educational Objectives for our undergraduate programs. Several years after graduation, we expect that:

1. Graduates in professional practice function effectively as responsible and collaborative professionals in Bioengineering/Biocomputational Engineering, or in a related field.

2. Graduates pursue advanced degrees or engage in other forms of continuing education.

STUDENT OUTCOMES

The Bioengineering Department has established that by graduation students will attain: 

1. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics

2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors

3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences

4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts

5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives

6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions

7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

BIOENGINEERING

DESCRIPTION

The B.S. in Bioengineering degree provides a structured curriculum comprised of three tracks. Biopharmaceutical Engineering is for students whose interests lie in genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, recombinant DNA, protein engineering, bioprocessing, drug synthesis and delivery. The Bioelectronics/photonics track covers education and research dealing with signal processing, biosensors, MEMs, biochips for DNA sequencing, laser and fiber based optical technology for biomedical applications. The Biomechanics and Biomaterials track encompasses applications of engineering principles to an understanding of biology and physiology, ranging from cells and tissues to organs and systems.

The B.S. in Bioengineering will prepare students for careers in established and emerging fields that require combining engineering principles with the life sciences. Potential paths open to students include the health care, biomedical, pharmaceutical, biomaterials, and other biotechnology related industries through careers in medicine or graduate studies.

The program strongly encourages experiential learning, including two summers of internships, required participation in Lehigh's Capstone Design Projects, and opportunities for undergraduate research for credit.

A total of 132 credit hours are required for graduation with a degree of bachelor of science in bioengineering.

Bioengineering Core Requirements

General Requirements
ENGL 001Critical Reading and Composition3
ENGL 002Research and Argument3
ECO 001Principles of Economics4
BIOE 226Ethics in Bioengineering Practice1
or PHIL 116 Bioethics
or PHIL 105 Ethics
ENGR 010Applied Engineering Computer Methods2
Electives to satisfy HSS depth and breadth requirements13
Free Electives (Number of general requirements and free elective credits are track-dependent.)3-5
Mathematics
MATH 021Calculus I4
MATH 022Calculus II4
MATH 023Calculus III4
MATH 205Linear Methods 13
MATH 231Probability and Statistics 13
Chemistry
CHM 030Introduction to Chemical Principles4
CHM 031Chemical Equilibria in Aqueous Systems4
CHM 110
CHM 111
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
4
Physics
PHY 011
PHY 012
Introductory Physics I
and Introductory Physics Laboratory I
5
PHY 021
PHY 022
Introductory Physics II
and Introductory Physics Laboratory II
5
Biological Sciences
BIOS 041
BIOS 042
Biology Core I: Cellular and Molecular
and Biology Core I: Cellular and Molecular Lab
4
BIOS 115
BIOS 116
Biology Core II: Genetics
and Biology Core II: Genetics Laboratory
4
Integrated Bioengineering
Required by all Three Tracks
ENGR 005Introduction to Engineering Practice2
BIOE 110Elements of Bioengineering4
BIOE 210Introduction to Engineering Physiology4
BIOE 211Capstone Design Project I3
BIOE 212Capstone Design Project II2
BIOE 225GMP Good manufacturing practice and regulatory affairs for bioengineers1
Engineering Requirement by Track
Select one of the following tracks:22-24
Biopharmaceutical Engineering Track
Organic Chemistry II
Integrated Biotechnology Laboratory
Engineering Materials and Processes
Material and Energy Balances of Chemical Processes
Bioengineering Thermodynamics
Biological Fluid Mechanics
Chemical Reactor Design 2
Bioelectronic/Biophotonics Track
Signals and Systems
Integrated Bioelectronics/Biophotonics Laboratory
Principles of Electrical Engineering
Electronic Circuits Laboratory
Electronic Circuits
Introduction to Electromagnetics
Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics
Engineering Materials and Processes
Biomechanics and Biomaterials Track
Fundamentals of Engineering Mechanics
Strength of Materials
Engineering Materials and Processes
Bioengineering Thermodynamics
Biological Fluid Mechanics
Biomechanics and Biomaterials
Integrated Biostructural Mechanics Laboratory
Bioengineering Electives
Select one of the following:3
Bioengineering Statistics
Biomolecular & Cellular Mechanics
Biotechnology I 3
Metabolic Engineering
Quantitative Biology
Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers
Introduction to Micro- and Nanofabrication
Technical Electives 49
Total Credits127-131

Typical four-year course schedule for BS in Bioengineering

Biopharmaceutical Engineering Track

First Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 001 (Pass/Fail)1BIOE 002 (Pass/Fail)1
CHM 0304BIOS 041
BIOS 042
4
MATH 0214MATH 0224
ENGL 0013PHY 011
PHY 012
5
ENGR 0102ENGL 0023
 14 17
Second Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 1104BIOE 2104
MATH 0234BIOE 0201
PHY 021
PHY 022
5CHM 0314
CHE 0313MATH 2053
 CHE 2104
 16 16
Third Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
CHM 110
CHM 111
4BIOE 2113
BIOS 115
BIOS 116
4CHE 2113
BIOE 3413BIOE 2474
BIOE 2251CHM 1123
MATH 2313ECO 0014
Elective3 
 18 17
Fourth Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 2122Electives16
BIOE 3433BIOE 2261
MAT 0333 
Electives9 
 17 17
Total Credits: 132

Bioelectronics/Biophotonics Track

First Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 001 (Pass/Fail)1BIOE 002 (Pass/Fail)1
CHM 0304BIOS 041
BIOS 042
4
MATH 0214MATH 0224
ENGL 0013PHY 011
PHY 012
5
ENGR 0102ENGL 0023
 14 17
Second Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 1104BIOE 2104
MATH 0234BIOE 0201
ECE 0814MATH 2053
PHY 021
PHY 022
5CHM 0314
 ECE 123
ECE 121
5
 17 17
Third Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOS 115
BIOS 116
4BIOE 2113
CHM 110
CHM 111
4MATH 2313
MAT 0333BIOE 3312
ECE 1084MECH 0033
BIOE 2251ECO 0014
 Elective3
 16 18
Fourth Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 2122BIOE 2261
ECE 202 or PHY 2123Electives16
Electives12 
 17 17
Total Credits: 133

Biomechanics and Biomaterials Track

First Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 001 (Pass/Fail)1BIOE 002 (Pass/Fail)1
CHM 0304BIOS 041
BIOS 042
4
MATH 0214MATH 0224
ENGL 0013PHY 011
PHY 012
5
ENGR 0102ENGL 0023
 14 17
Second Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 1104BIOE 2104
MECH 0033BIOE 0201
MATH 0234MATH 2053
PHY 021
PHY 022
5CHM 0314
 MAT 0333
 MAT 2053
 16 18
Third Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
CHM 110
CHM 111
4BIOE 2113
MATH 2313BIOE 2573
BIOS 115
BIOS 116
4BIOE 3572
Electives6BIOE 2474
BIOE 2251Electives3
 MECH 0123
 18 18
Fourth Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
BIOE 2122Electives16
ECO 0014BIOE 2261
Electives12 
 18 17
Total Credits: 136

biocomputational engineering

DESCRIPTION

Biocomputational Engineering is a new academic program at Lehigh that is at the nexus of the biological sciences, engineering, and computer science.  The curriculum begins with classes in the mathematics and life & physical sciences, as well as computer programming and core engineering principles, which form the foundation for our biocomputations courses that cover a range of subjects, from bioinformatics and machine learning to biophysical models and biomedical signals.   In our capstone courses, the students integrate and apply what they have learned in the earlier portion of the curriculum in a hands-on, collaborative setting.  Our faculty are drawn from Bioengineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Biological Sciences, Physics, and Industrial and Systems Engineering, which will expose the students in this program to a rich, diverse range of expertise in this exciting discipline.  Opportunities for academic research and  employment in the field of Biocomputational Engineering are growing dramatically. People with experience in areas such bioinformatics and data analysis are currently in high demand at pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and software companies. 

A total of 130 credit hours is required for graduation with a degree of bachelor of science in biocomputational engineering.

typical four-year course schedule for bs in bioengineering

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 0214MATH 0224
CHM 0304PHY 0114
ENGR 0052PHY 0121
ENGR 0102ENGL 0023
ENGL 0013ECO 0014
 15 16
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 2053MATH 2313
PHY 0214BIOS 0413
PHY 0221BIOS 0421
CSE 0074CSE 0173
CHM 0314HSS4
 HSS4
 16 18
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 0234BIOC 2363
BIOC 2143BIOC 2133
ISE 2403BIOE 2104
ISE 364 or CSE 3263ISE 1724
BIOS 1153PHY 380 or BIOE 3633
BIOS 1161 
 17 17
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOC 2403BIOC 2413
TECHNICAL ELECTIVE 13CSE 3083
TECHNICAL ELECTIVE 23BIOE 2261
HSS4TECHNICAL ELECTIVE 33
FREE ELECTIVE4HSS/FREE ELECTIVE4
 17 14
Total Credits: 130

Students must take nine (9) credits of technical electives.  Three (3) of the twelve credits must include BIOC, BIOE, CSE, and/or ISE courses at the 300-level or higher.  The remaining six (6) credits may include engineering courses at the 200-level or higher and/or BIOS/CHM/PHY/MATH courses at the 200-level or higher. (Some 200-level courses are excluded from this list; the complete list of approved courses is available from the Biocomputational Engineering Program.) 

Graduate Program

Bioengineering offers graduate programs leading to a doctor of philosophy or a master of science degree. The graduate program will train students to solve problems that require the application of interdisciplinary knowledge, combining life sciences, physical sciences, and engineering. The program will emphasize cellular and biomolecular science and engineering, and aims to attract students with diverse academic backgrounds. Students who do not complete the doctor of philosophy have the option to earn a master of science.

Graduate program objectives

  1.  Understand complexities and challenges associated with working in the field of Bioengineering with an advanced degree.
  2. Demonstrate depth of knowledge in Bioengineering and related fields.
  3. Be creators of new knowledge and products in the field of Bioengineering.
  4. Succeed in a variety of career paths.

Major Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree are required to complete a minimum of 72 credits.

ENGR 452Mathematical Methods In Engineering I3
BIOS 411Advanced Cell Biology (or a course from an approved list of BIOS or related courses)3
Two additional core courses from an approved list of courses6
Twelve credits of adviser-approved technical electives at the 300-level or higher12
Six credits of dissertation research6
Additional 42 credits of electives and/or dissertation research 42
Total Credits72

 Students must pass a qualification exam, typically taken after three semesters of study,  a final written dissertation as well as an oral defense of the dissertation.

Master of Science Degree

An oral defense of thesis research is dependent upon the requirements of the student's adviser.

Two options for the master of science degree are available: a thesis option and a non-thesis option. Candidates for both the thesis and non-thesis master of science degree are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits.  Per university policy, graduate students may count no more than 12 credits at the 300-level toward the M.S. degree.

Thesis Option

ENGR 452Mathematical Methods In Engineering I3
BIOS 411Advanced Cell Biology (or a course from an approved list of BIOS or related courses)3
Two additional core courses from an approved list of courses6
Twelve credits of adviser-approved technical electives at the 300-level or higher.12
Six credits of thesis research, culminating in a written thesis. 6
Total Credits30

Non-Thesis Option

ENGR 452Mathematical Methods In Engineering I3
BIOS 411Advanced Cell Biology (or a course from an approved list of BIOS or related courses)3
Two additional core courses from an approved list of courses6
Eighteen credits of adviser-approved technical electives at the 300-level or higher. No thesis research or written thesis is required.18
Total Credits30

Courses

BIOE 001 Freshman Seminar 1, Introduction to Bioengineering 1: Philosophy to Practice 1 Credit

Overview of the bioengineering field, the advancements of related topics in sciences, technology, engineering and applications for health care and medicine. Humanity and ethical issues. Pass/Fail.

BIOE 002 Freshman Seminar 2, Introduction to Bioengineering II: Current Topics 1 Credit

Overview of a broad spectrum of current topical areas in biotechnology and bioengineering and their applications in health care and medicine. Pass/Fail.

BIOE 020 Bioengineering Sophomore Research Seminar 1 Credit

Exposure to opportunities for on-campus research in bioengineering. Review of current literature on bioengineering topics through written reports and/or oral presentations. Preparation of written research proposal, including definition of topic, objectives, methodologies, research plans, and expected impact.

BIOE 110 Elements of Bioengineering 4 Credits

An introduction to the fields of biotechnology and biomedical engineering. The areas include biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, rehabilitation engineering, biosensors, biotechnology and tissue engineering.
Prerequisites: (BIOS 041 and BIOS 042)

BIOE 210 Introduction to Engineering Physiology 4 Credits

Mammalian physiology for bioengineering students, with an emphasis on control mechanisms and engineering principles. Basic cell function; biological control systems; muscle; neural; endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, renal, and reproductive systems; regulation of metabolism and defense mechanisms. Includes laboratory work.
Prerequisites: (BIOS 041 and BIOS 042) and MATH 022

BIOE 211 (MAT 211, ME 211) Capstone Design Project I 3 Credits

Students work on teams, integrating knowledge and skills acquired in their prior course work, to design practical solutions to real-world problems, typically in collaboration with industry, entrepreneurs, faculty, or campus departments. Teams perform in-depth engineering design while considering engineering standards and the project business case. Constraints, including technical, financial, environmental, societal, supply chain, regulatory, and others are considered throughout. Teams produce written reports, oral presentations, and prototypes appropriate for the project.
Prerequisites: BIOE 110 and BIOE 210 and (CHE 031 or MECH 003 or ECE 081)
Can be taken Concurrently: BIOE 210

BIOE 212 (MAT 212, ME 212) Capstone Design Project II 2 Credits

Students continue developing their solutions from BIOE 211 through prototype fabrication and testing, iteration, and failure mode analysis. New information about the project, as well as new knowledge, standards, and constraints, may be identified, considered and integrated into the solution. Teams are expected to produce a final project-specific prototype, an implementation plan appropriate to the project, as well as related business case financial models. Additional deliverables include written reports and presentations.
Prerequisites: BIOE 211 and BIOE 225
Can be taken Concurrently: BIOE 225

BIOE 225 GMP Good manufacturing practice and regulatory affairs for bioengineers 1 Credit

Review of the principles of the Food and Drug Administration including its history, mission and applied regulations. Understanding of how the FDA works with industry and is integral to the development of new products and technologies. Review and critique of case studies in various parts of the biomedical industry to see how FDA regulations are applied. Validation and analysis of products using failure mode analysis.
Prerequisites: BIOE 110

BIOE 226 Ethics in Bioengineering Practice 1 Credit

Introduction to ethical principles and role of critical thinking in ethical decision-making. Analysis of contemporary issues in bioengineering practice. Topics include biomedical device risk and failure, ethics of clinical trials, animal research, human enhancement, and research conduct.

BIOE 242 Bioengineering Research 1-4 Credits

Research on a topic chosen by students, with a faculty advisor typically from the three bioengineering tracks (biopharmaceutical engineering, bioelectronic/biophotonics or biomechanics and biomaterials). Independent meetings with advising professor will track progress. Includes written reports and/or oral presentations. Consent of instructor required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

BIOE 246 Bioengineering Thermodynamics 4 Credits

Engineering thermodynamics principles and their application to biological systems. Fundamental thermodynamics concepts, first and second law principles, conservation laws, properties of pure substances and biochemical mixtures under physiological conditions, energy conversion systems, thermodynamic aspects of biological processes.
Prerequisites: PHY 011 and MATH 022 and CHM 031
Can be taken Concurrently: CHM 031

BIOE 247 Biological Fluid Mechanics 4 Credits

Fluid and mass transport and their applications in biological systems. Mass conservation. Momentum and energy balances in fluid flow. Incompressible fluid flow with inviscid and viscous applications. Dimensional analysis. Fluid flow in pipes and porous media. Diffusion and convection.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

BIOE 257 Biomechanics and Biomaterials 3 Credits

Biomechanical analysis of tissues, microstructure of materials, force and mechanics in rigid and deformable bodies, analysis of biological response and biocompatibility, failure processes of implantable biomaterials/devices, strength of materials, and biomechanics of cells. Biomechanics and biomaterials concepts integrated (1) to examine the theoretical and practical implications of material properties and (2) to examine the biomechanical principles governing system behavior.
Prerequisites: MAT 033 and MECH 003 and MATH 205
Can be taken Concurrently: MATH 205

BIOE 290 Bioengineering Thesis 1-3 Credits

Thesis, guided by a faculty advisor, based on research and/or design projects. Independent meetings with advising professor to track progress. Consent of instructor required.
Prerequisites: BIOE 242 or TE 212

BIOE 300 Apprentice Teaching 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

BIOE 307 (CSE 307) Structural Bioinformatics 3 Credits

Computational techniques and principles of structural biology used to examine molecular structure, function, and evolution. Topics include: protein structure alignment and prediction; molecular surface analysis; statistical modeling; QSAR; computational drug design; influences on binding specificity; protein-ligand, -protein, and -DNA interactions; molecular simulation, electrostatics. Tutorials on UNIX systems and research software support an interdisciplinary collaborative project in computational structural biology. Credit will not be given for both CSE 307 and CSE 407. Must have junior standing or higher.
Prerequisites: BIOS 120 or CSE 109 or CHM 113 or MATH 231

BIOE 308 (CSE 308) Bioinformatics: Issues and Algorithms 3 Credits

Computational problems and their associated algorithms arising from the creation, analysis, and management of bioinformatics data. Genetic sequence comparison and alignment, physical mapping, genome sequencing and assembly, clustering of DNA microarray results in gene expression studies, computation of genomic rearrangements and evolutionary trees. Credit will not be given for both BIOE 308 (CSE 308) and BIOE 408 (CSE 408). No prior background in biology is assumed.
Prerequisites: CSE 017
Attribute/Distribution: ND

BIOE 311 (MAT 311) Introduction to Biomaterials 3 Credits

Application of materials science and engineering principles to biomedical materials with a focus on polymers, ceramics, and metals. Synthesis and fabrication of biomaterials, structure-property-function relationships related to biocompatibility and bioactivity; nano- to macro-scale characterization; material-tissue interactions; and applications of biomaterials including implants, devices, drug delivery, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Prerequisites: MAT 033

BIOE 315 (ME 315) Bioengineering Statistics 3 Credits

Advanced methods in probability and statistics applied to bioengineering problems focusing on modeling and data analysis. Topics include the following: types of data, types of distributions, parametric and nonparametric analyses, goodness-of-fit, regression, power analysis, and multivariate analysis, life models, simulation, cluster analysis, and Bayesian statistics. Special emphasis is placed on projects and case studies.
Prerequisites: MATH 231

BIOE 316 (ME 316) Introduction to Force Spectroscopy 3 Credits

Fundamentals of major force spectroscopy methods, including atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, and magnetic tweezers. Principles of force measurement, force calibration, and signal and noise. Applications to the mechanical properties of biomaterials, such as polymer elasticity, protein folding, nanoindentation, and structural transitions in macromolecules. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 416.
Prerequisites: MECH 003

BIOE 318 (CHE 318, MAT 318) Soft Materials: Rheology and Characterization 3 Credits

Characterization of soft materials using rheological techniques. Fundamentals of rheology and rheological characterization applied to materials such as polymers, glassy liquids and polymeric gels. Closed to students who have taken CHE/BIOE/MAT 418. Instructor permission or graduate status required.

BIOE 320 (CSE 320) Biomedical Image Computing and Modeling 3 Credits

Biomedical image modalities, image computing techniques, and imaging informatics systems. Understanding, using, and developing algorithms and software to analyze biomedical image data and extract useful quantitative information: Biomedical image modalities and formats; image processing and analysis; geometric and statistical modeling; image informatics systems in biomedicine. Credit will not be given for both BIOE 320 and BIOE 420.
Prerequisites: (MATH 205 or MATH 043) and CSE 017
Attribute/Distribution: ND

BIOE 321 Biomolecular & Cellular Mechanics 3 Credits

Mechanics and physics of the components of the cell, ranging in length scale from fundamental biomolecules to the entire cell. The course covers the mechanics of proteins and other biopolymers in 1D, 2D, and 3D structures, cell membrane structure and dynamics, and the mechanics of the whole cell.
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and MATH 231 and PHY 022 and (PHY 013 or PHY 021 or PHY 023)

BIOE 324 (MAT 324) Introduction to Organic Biomaterials 3 Credits

Property, characterization, fabrication and modification of organic materials for biomedical and biological applications; host responses to biomaterials on the molecular, cellular and system level; general introduction to biosensors, drug delivery devices and tissue engineering.
Prerequisites: BIOE 110

BIOE 325 (MAT 325) Inorganic Biomaterials 3 Credits

Fabrication methods for biomedical implants and devices. Selection of metals and ceramics with specific bulk and surface physical as well as chemical properties. The role of materials chemistry and microstructure. Biocompatibility. Case studies (dental and orthopedic implants, stents, nonporous ceramic filters for kidney dialysis).
Prerequisites: MAT 033

BIOE 326 (MAT 326) Biomimetic and Bio-enabled Materials 3 Credits

The structure, function, properties and use of biopolymers, biocomposites, and biominerals. Biomimetic materials design, including colloids, interfaces, macromolecules, and applications of such materials. Environmental and ethical considerations, such as degradation products when using biomimetic materials. Closed to students who have taken MAT 426 (BIOE 426).
Prerequisites: MAT 033 or BIOE 110
Attribute/Distribution: ND

BIOE 331 Integrated Bioelectronics/Biophotonics Laboratory 2 Credits

Experiments in design and analysis of bioelectronics circuits, micropattering of biological cells, micromanipulation of biological cells using electric fields, analysis of pacemakers, instrumentation and computer interfaces, ultrasound, optic, laser tweezers and advanced imaging and optical microscopy techniques for biological applications.
Prerequisites: (ECE 081 or PHY 190) and (PHY 013 or PHY 021 or PHY 023) and PHY 022 and ECE 121 and ECE 123
Can be taken Concurrently: ECE 121, ECE 123

BIOE 339 Neuronal Modeling and Computation 3 Credits

Neuroscience in a computational, mathematical, and engineering framework. Literature surveys and case studies with simulations. Computational aspects of information processing within the nervous system by focusing on single neuron modeling. Single neurons and how their biological properties relate to neuronal coding. Biophysics of single neurons, signal detection and signal reconstruction, information theory, population coding and temporal coding.
Prerequisites: ENGR 010 and MATH 205

BIOE 341 (CHE 341) Biotechnology I 3 Credits

Applications of material and energy balances; heat, mass, and momentum transfer; enzyme and microbial kinetics; and mathematical modeling to the engineering design and scale-up of bio-reactor systems. Closed to students who have taken CHE 441 (BIOE 341 and BIOE 441).
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and CHE 031 and (CHM 031 or CHM 041)

BIOE 342 (CHE 342) Biotechnology II 3 Credits

Engineering design and analysis of the unit operations used in the recovery and purification of products manufactured by the biotechnology industries. Requirements for product finishing and waste handling will be addressed. Closed to students who have taken CHE 442 (BIOE 342 and BIOE 442).
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and CHE 031 and (CHM 031 or CHM 041)

BIOE 343 Integrated Biotechnology Laboratory 3 Credits

Biosafety, sterilization, media formulation, biochemical and enzyme assays, recombinant DNA technique, protein and DNA isolation and purification, for microbial fermentation and animal cell culture. Integration of biotechnology techniques for biopharmaceutical production. Consent of instructor required.
Prerequisites: BIOE 110 and (CHE 341 or BIOE 341)

BIOE 344 (CHE 344) Molecular Bioengineering 3 Credits

Kinetics in small systems, stochastic simulation of biochemical processes, receptor-mediated adhesion, dynamics of ion-channels, ligand binding, biochemical transport, surface Plasmon resonance, DNA microarray design, and chemical approaches to systems biology. Senior standing in BIOE.
Prerequisites: (MATH 205 and MATH 231)

BIOE 345 (CHE 345) Quantitative Biology 3 Credits

Basic concepts in molecular and cellular biology as well as biochemistry. Connects these to engineering principles in order to (1) develop a quantitative understanding of biological systems and (2) understand how applications of methods and principles in biology are used in modern engineering. Topics include protein structure and function, enzymology, membrane transport and trafficking, transcription/translation, signal transduction and models for cellular processes. An important part of this course is also taking topics discussed in lecture and translating them into practice.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

BIOE 349 Metabolic Engineering 3 Credits

Quantitative perspective of cellular metabolism and biochemical pathways. Methods for analyzing stoichiometric and kinetic models, mass balances, flux in reaction networks, and metabolic control. Solving problems using advanced mathematics and computer programming.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

BIOE 350 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

Special topics of study in bioengineering. Permission of Instructor.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

BIOE 357 Integrated Biostructural Mechanics Laboratory 2 Credits

Experimental manipulation and analysis of mammalian cells, with a focus on the biomechanical properties of cells, the interface of living and non-living materials, and on bioengineering applications. Experimental techniques include mammalian cell culture, advanced microscopy techniques, preparation of bioactive substrates, microfluidic device fabrication, micropatterning of cells and cell growth in 3D matrices. Consent of instructor required.
Prerequisites: BIOE 110

BIOE 358 Biomechanics 3 Credits

Applications of mechanics to study behavior of anatomical structures and biological tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Specific topics include structure and function of biological tissues, mechanical properties of biological tissues, and analysis of specific tissues (i.e. bone, muscle, and soft connective tissues).
Prerequisites: MECH 003
Can be taken Concurrently: MECH 003

BIOE 359 Biomechanics Laboratory 1 Credit

Applications of mechanics to study behavior of anatomical structures and biological tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Specific topics include structure and function of biological tissues, mechanical properties of biological tissues, and analysis of specific tissues (i.e. bone, muscle, and soft connective tissues).
Prerequisites: MECH 003 and BIOE 358
Can be taken Concurrently: MECH 003, BIOE 358

BIOE 363 (CHE 363) Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers 3 Credits

Introduction to numerical methods in science and engineering. Expose students to the numerical solution of a variety of commonly encountered problems, enhance their numerical programming skills, and provide a broad base on which to build more specialized knowledge of computational methods. Topics include solution of linear and nonlinear sets of algebraic equations, linear and logistic regression, ordinary differential equations, Fourier analysis, eigenvalues, partial differential equations by finite difference and finite element methods.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

BIOE 366 (ECE 366) Neural Engineering 3 Credits

Neural system interfaces for scientific and health applications. Basic properties of neurons, signal detection and stimulation, instrumentation and microfabricated electrode arrays. Fundamentals of peripheral and central neural signals and EEG, and applications such as neural prostheses, implants and brain-computer interfaces. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 466, ECE 366, or ECE 466.
Prerequisites: ECE 081

BIOE 367 (CHE 367) Engineering in Medicine 3 Credits

Introduction to the physical basis of disease. Discussion of biomolecular strategies to overcome these changes. Topics include drug delivery, targeting, and tissue engineering, with a focus on infectious disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disease. Closed to students who have taken CHE 467 (BIOE 367 and BIOE 467).

BIOE 368 (ECE 368) Introduction to Biophotonics and Optical Biomedical Imaging 3 Credits

Optical principles, techniques, and instruments used in biomedical research and clinical medicine. Fundamental concepts of optical imaging and spectroscopy systems, and details of light-tissue interaction. Commercial devices and instruments, as well as novel optical imaging technologies in development. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 468, ECE 368, or ECE 468.
Prerequisites: ECE 202 or PHY 212

BIOE 369 (CHE 369) Advanced Topics in Regulatory Affairs 3 Credits

Regulatory requirements for the development and manufacture of 21st century medical products. Current challenges and innovative technologies in pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Topics include combination products, biosimilars, cell therapeutics, mobile medical applications, 3D-printed products, big data in healthcare, new approaches to process validation. Closed to students who have taken BIOE/CHE 469.
Prerequisites: BIOE 225

BIOE 380 (BIOS 380) Biomolecular & Cellular Biophysics 3-4 Credits

Physical principles of biomolecular and cellular organization. Biomolecular interactions and recognition, molecular motors, physical organization and functioning of cellular membranes, electrical signaling in live cells. Modern techniques in biophysics, molecular spectroscopy, molecular modeling, florescence imaging, electrophysiology, electron microscopy.
Prerequisites: (BIOS 115) and (PHY 013 or PHY 021)

BIOE 407 (CSE 407) Structural Bioinformatics 3 Credits

Computational techniques and principles of structural biology used to examine molecular structure, function, and evolution. Topics include: protein structure alignment and prediction; molecular surface analysis; statistical modeling; QSAR; computational drug design; influences on binding specificity; protein-ligand, -protein, and –DNA interactions; molecular simulation, electrostatics. This course, a version of 307 for graduate students, requires advanced assignments and a collaborative project. Credit will not be given for both BIOE 307 and 407. Consent of instructor required.

BIOE 408 (CSE 408) Bioinformatics: Issues and Algorithms 3 Credits

Computational problems and their associated algorithms arising from the creation, analysis, and management of bioinformatics data. Genetic sequence comparison and alignment, physical mapping, genome sequencing and assembly, clustering of DNA microarray results in gene expression studies, computation of genomic rearrangements and evolutionary trees. This course, a version of 308 for graduate students requires advanced assignments. Credit will not be given for both BIOE 308 (CSE 308) and BIOE 408 (CSE 408). No prior background in biology is assumed.
Prerequisites: CSE 017 or CSE 018
Attribute/Distribution: ND

BIOE 411 (MAT 411) Introductions to Biomaterials 3 Credits

Application of materials science and engineering principles to biomedical materials with a focus on polymers, ceramics, and metals. Synthesis and fabrication of biomaterials, structure-property-function relationships related to biocompatibility and bioactivity; nano- to macro-scale characterization; material-tissue interactions; and applications of biomaterials including implants, devices, drug delivery, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. MAT 411 will require project-based study. Credit will not be given for both MAT 311 and MAT 411.
Prerequisites: MAT 033

BIOE 415 Bioengineering Statistics 3 Credits

Advanced methods in probability and statistics applied to bioengineering problems focusing on modeling and data analysis. Topics include the following: types of data, types of distributions, parametric and nonparametric analyses, goodness-of-fit, regression, power analysis, and multivariate analysis, life models, simulation, cluster analysis, and Bayesian statistics. Special emphasis is placed on projects and case studies. Credit can not be received for both BIOE/ME 315 and BIOE 415.

BIOE 416 Introduction to Force Spectroscopy 3 Credits

This course is a graduate version of BIOE 316 (ME 316). While the lecture content will be the same as the 300-level course, students in the 400-level class will be expected to complete more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 316 (ME 316).

BIOE 417 (CHE 417, MAT 417) Soft Materials: Mechanics and Physics 3 Credits

Physical and mechanical behavior of soft materials such as gels, foams, rubbers, soft adhesives, and most biological tissue. Large strain kinematics, stress measures, constitutive relations from the molecular and continuum points of view, and application to problems such as cavitation, creasing, thin structures, fracture, adhesion, surface stress, and electroactive materials.
Prerequisites: CHE 452 or ENGR 452

BIOE 418 (CHE 418, MAT 418) Soft Materials: Rheology and Characterization 3 Credits

See the course description listed for CHE/BIOE/MAT 318. In order to receive 400-level credits, the student must do an additional, more advanced term project, as defined by the instructor at the beginning of the course. Closed to students who have taken CHE/BIOE/MAT 318.

BIOE 420 (CSE 420) Biomedical Image Computing and Modeling 3 Credits

Biomedical image modalities, image computing techniques, and imaging informatics systems. Understanding, using, and developing algorithms and software to analyze biomedical image data and extract useful quantitative information: Biomedical image modalities and formats; image processing and analysis; geometric and statistical modeling; image informatics systems in biomedicine. This course, a graduate version of BIOE 320, requires additional advanced assignments. Credit will not be given for both BIOE 320 and BIOE 420.
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and CSE 109
Attribute/Distribution: ND

BIOE 421 (CHE 421) Biomolecular & Cellular Mechanics 3 Credits

Mechanics and physics of cell components, from fundamental biomolecules to the entire cell. The mechanics of proteins and other biopolymers in 1D, 2D, and 3D structures, cell membrane structure and dynamics, and the mechanics of the whole cell. This course is a graduate version of CHE 321 (BioE/Phy 321). The lecture content will be the same as in CHE 321 (BioE/Phy 321), but students enrolled in CHE 421 (BIOE 421) will have more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have completed CHE 321 (BioE/Phy 321). Must have graduate standing.

BIOE 424 (MAT 424) Introduction to Organic Biomaterials 3 Credits

Property, characterization, fabrication, and modification of organic materials for biomedical and biological applications; host responses to biomaterials on the molecular, cellular, and system level; general introduction to biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. Graduate version of BIOE 324 requiring additional assignments. Credit is not given for both BIOE 324 (MAT 324) and BIOE 424 (MAT 424).
Prerequisites: MAT 033

BIOE 425 (MAT 425) Inorganic Biomaterials 3 Credits

Fabrication methods for biomedical implant and devices. Selection of metals and ceramics with specific bulk and surface physical as well as chemical properties. The role of materials chemistry and microstructure. Biocompatibility. Case studies (dental and orthopedic implants, stents, nonporous ceramic filters for kidney dialysis). Graduate version of MAT 325; credit will not be given for both MAT 325 and MAT 425.
Prerequisites: MAT 033

BIOE 426 (MAT 426) Biomimetic and Bio-enabled Materials 3 Credits

This course is a graduate version of BIOE 326 (MAT 326). While the lecture content will be the same as the 300-level course, students enrolled in BIOE 426 (MAT 426) will have more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 326 (MAT 326). Must have graduate standing in Bioengineering or Materials Science and Engineering.
Attribute/Distribution: ND

BIOE 439 (CHE 439) Neuronal Modeling and Computation 3 Credits

This course is a graduate version of BIOE 339 (CHE 339). While the lecture content will be the same as the 300-level course , students in the 400-level class will be expected to complete an independent term project. Closed to students who have completed BIOE 339 (CHE 339). Must have graduate standing in Bioengineering or Chemical Engineering.

BIOE 441 (CHE 441) Biotechnology I 3 Credits

See the course description listed for BIOE 341. In order to receive 400-level credits, the student must do an additional, more advanced term project, as defined by the instructor at the beginning of the course. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 341 (CHE 341).

BIOE 442 (CHE 442) Biotechnology II 3 Credits

See the course description listed for BIOE 342 (CHE 342). In order to receive 400-level credit, the student must do an additional, more advanced term project, as defined by the instructor at the beginning of the course. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 342 (CHE 342).

BIOE 447 (CHE 447) Molecular Bioengineering 3 Credits

This course is a graduate version of CHE 344 (BIOE 344). While the lecture content will be the same as the 300-level course, students enrolled in CHE 447 will have more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have completed BIOE 344 (CHE 344).

BIOE 449 (CHE 449) Metabolic Engineering 3 Credits

This course is a graduate version of BIOE 349. While the lecture content will be the same as the 300-level course, students enrolled in BIOE 449 (CHE 449) will have more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have completed BIOE 349. Must have graduate standing in Chemical Engineering or Bioengineering.

BIOE 450 Special Topics 1-3 Credits

Special topics of study in bioengineering. Permission of instructor.

BIOE 451 Bioengineering Research Projects 1-6 Credits

Bioengineering-related research projects, based upon faculty and student interest. Projects may involve interaction with industry or local communities. Department permission required. A maximum of 6 credits of BIOE 451 can be used toward degree requirements.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

BIOE 452 (CHE 452, ENGR 452, ME 452) Mathematical Methods In Engineering I 3 Credits

Analytical techniques relevant to the engineering sciences are described. Vector spaces; eigenvalues; eigenvectors. Linear ordinary differential equations; diagonalizable and non-diagonalizable systems. Inhomogeneous linear systems; variation of parameters. Non-linear systems; stability; phase plane. Series solutions of linear ordinary differential equations; special functions. Laplace and Fourier transforms; application to partial differential equations and integral equations. Sturm-Liouville theory. Finite Fourier transforms; planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries.

BIOE 456 (CHE 456) Stochastic Processes: Theory and Applications in Biology 3 Credits

Stochastic, or probabilistic, models of cellular processes and other biological systems to describe the inherent randomness of nature. Topics covered include theory and biological applications of Markov chains, the Master Equation, white noise and stochastic integrals, the Fokker-Planck Equation, and noise in gene expression. Some minimal experience in programming and/or Mathematica/Matlab.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

BIOE 463 (CHE 463) Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers 3 Credits

See the course description listed for CHE 363 (BIOE 363). This course is graduate version of CHE 363 (BIOE 363). The lecture content will be the same as CHE 363 (BIOE 363), but students enrolled in CHE 463 (BIOE 463) will have more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have taken CHE 363 (BIOE 363). Must have graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

BIOE 466 (ECE 466) Neural Engineering 3 Credits

Neural system interfaces for scientific and health applications. Basic properties of neurons, signal detection and stimulation, instrumentation and microfabricated electrode arrays. Fundamentals of peripheral and central neural signals and EEG, and applications such as neural prostheses, implants and brain-computer interfaces. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 366, ECE 366, or ECE 466. Students enrolled in the course at the 400-level must complete additional advanced assignments, as defined by the course instructor.

BIOE 467 (CHE 467) Engineering in Medicine 3 Credits

See the course description listed for CHE 367 (BIOE 367). In order to receive 400-level credits, the student must do an additional, more advanced term project, as defined by the instructor at the beginning of the course. Closed to students who have taken CHE 367 (BIOE 367), or BIOE 467.

BIOE 468 (ECE 468) Introduction to Biophotonics and Optical Biomedical Imaging 3 Credits

Optical principles, techniques, and instruments used in biomedical research and clinical medicine. Fundamental concepts of optical imaging and spectroscopy systems, and details of light-tissue interaction. Commercial devices and instruments, as well as novel optical imaging technologies in development. Closed to students who have taken BIOE 368, ECE 368, or ECE 468. Students enrolled in the course at the 400-level must complete additional advanced assignments, as defined by the course instructor.

BIOE 469 (CHE 469) Advanced Topics in Regulatory Affairs 3 Credits

This course is a graduate version of BIOE 369 (CHE 369). While the lecture content will be the same as the 300-level course, students enrolled in BIOE 469 (CHE 469) will have more advanced assignments. Closed to students who have taken BIOE/CHE 369.

BIOE 490 Thesis 1-6 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

BIOE 499 Dissertation 1-12 Credits

Professors. Xuanhong Cheng, PhD (University of Washington); Stephen Paul DeWeerth, PhD (California Institute of Technology); Tsai-An Hsu, PhD (Northwestern University); Wonpil Im, PhD (Cornell University); Anand Jagota, PhD (Cornell University); Yaling Liu, PhD (Northwestern University); Anand Ramamurthi, PhD (Oklahoma State University); Svetlana Tatic-Lucic, PhD (California Institute of Technology)

Associate Professors. Yevgeny Berdichevsky, PhD (University of California, San Diego); Sabrina S. Jedlicka, PhD (Purdue University); Xiaohui Zhang, PhD (University of Miam)

Assistant Professors. Lesley W. Chow, PhD (Northwestern University); Eugene Thomas Pashuck, III, PhD (Northwestern University); Yu Zhang, PhD (East China University of Science and Technology)

Professors Of Practice. Ines Jose Abrantes De O Seabra Nunes, PhD (Universidad de Colima); Lori Herz, PhD (Rutgers University); Susan Fueshko Perry, PhD (The Pennsylvania State University)

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