2013-14 Catalog

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Civil Engineering

Civil engineering occupies a prominent position as one of the major fields in the engineering profession. Civil engineers are concerned with all aspects of the conception, planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of major physical works and facilities that are essential to modern life. Civil engineering projects are typically characterized by extreme size, complexity, durability, and cost. Examples include bridges, buildings, transportation facilities, tunnels, coastal facilities, dams, foundations, and waterways.

The Mission of our Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science degree program is to educate students in the principles and methods essential to the practice and advancement of civil and environmental engineering. Our goal is to prepare students to apply and continually cultivate knowledge that will enable them to become successful practitioners, innovators and leaders in serving the needs of a complex society.

The Program Educational Objectives of our accredited Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science program are to prepare Civil Engineering Graduates to :

  1. Develop careers in civil engineering and other professionally related fields.
  2. Seek additional professional training and personal development.
  3. Apply their skills to develop innovative solutions and technologies.
  4. Pursue professional licensure and/or certification.
  5. Advance to become members of professional societies and future leaders in their profession.

To achieve the program education objectives, the civil engineering program has adopted the following eleven ABET student outcomes:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Environmental Engineering

Environmental Engineering is an interdisciplinary branch of the engineering profession where science and engineering principles are combined to provide healthy soil, water and air; remediate contaminated sites; and to improve the overall quality of the environment through the development of sustainable processes. Example activities include design of water and wastewater treatment facilities, detecting and modeling fate and transport of contaminants in both natural and engineered environments; developing technology-based solutions for restoring environmental quality; and developing and/or modifying industrial processes for ecological preservation and enhanced sustainability.

The Mission of our Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Science degree program is to educate students in the principles and methods essential to the practice and advancement of the interdisciplinary field of environmental engineering. The program is proactive and continues to incorporate new and emerging paradigms in all aspects of teaching and education while maintaining rigorous standards in traditional approaches to engineered solutions of environmental problems. Graduates of the program possess technical expertise required to maintain a healthy balance between societal welfare, economic growth and the environment surrounding us.

The Program Educational Objectives of our accredited Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Science program are to prepare environmental engineering graduates to:

  1. Develop careers in environmental engineering and other professionally related fields.
  2. Seek additional professional training and personal development.
  3. Apply their skills to develop innovative solutions and technologies.
  4. Pursue professional licensure and/or certification.
  5. Advance to become members of professional societies and future leaders in their profession.

To achieve the program education objectives, the environmental engineering program has adopted the following eleven ABET student outcomes:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

 

Educational and Career Opportunities

In each curriculum, emphasis is placed on the development of a solid knowledge of civil or environmental engineering fundamentals. Both undergraduate programs include a strong base of mathematics, including calculus, probability and statistics, and the physical sciences, followed by a course in planning and engineering economics. A broad range of required and elective courses in engineering science, analysis and design in the areas listed above meet each set of program objectives. Elective courses in both programs extend across the areas of structural, geotechnical, hydraulic, environmental, construction, project management, and transportation engineering. Additional elective courses in the environmental program are available from chemical engineering, chemistry, biology, and earth and environmental science. Five-year programs are available for students interested in a second bachelor’s degree in a major in the College of Arts and Sciences (see listings under Arts-Engineering; Civil Engineering and Earth and Environmental Sciences).

The civil and environmental engineering programs prepare individuals for entry into the engineering profession or for entry into high-quality programs of graduate study. With proper selection of electives, students may also prepare for entrance into schools of law or medicine, or into master’s-level programs in engineering management or business administration.

For additional useful information visit our departmental website www.lehigh.edu/~incee/.


B.S. in Civil Engineering

Required Courses

A total of 130 credit hours are required for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering.

Recommended Sequence of Courses

The HSS Advanced Requirement of 13 credits is shown below as three 3-credit courses and one 4-credit course. Other options are possible.

First Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
ENGL 0013ENGL 0023
MATH 0214CHM 0304
ENGR 0052MATH 0224
PHY 011
  & PHY 012
5ENGR 0102
 ECO 0014
 14 17
Second Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
MATH 0234MATH 2053
CEE 0033CEE 0593
CEE 0103PHY 021
  & PHY 022
5
CEE 0111CEE 1704
CEE 0122FE Free Elective3
HSS Humanities/Social Sciences Elective3 
 16 18
Third Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
CEE 1213CEE 1172
CEE 1233CEE 2023
CEE 1423CEE 262 or 2643
CEE 1594CEE 2223
BSE Basic Science Elective13CEE 2423
 AE CEE Approved Elective23
 16 17
Fourth Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
CEE 2032CEE 29033
HSS Humanities/Social Sciences Elective7HSS Humanities/Social Science Elective3
AE CEE Approved Electives28AE CEE Approved Electives26
 FE Free Elective3
 17 15
Total Credits: 130

1

Basic Science Elective

ASTR 007, ASTR 105, ASTR 301, ASTR 302, ASTR 332, ASTR 342,

BIOS 010, BIOS 041,

EES 011, EES 021, EES 024, EES 025, EES 026, EES 027, EES 028, EES 031, EES 032, EES 089

2

Seventeen CEE elective credits approved by the CEE department; list available from department.

3

Students must have completed successfully at least one CEE approved elective related to the design project topic area.

The selection of elective courses is to be in consultation with student’s academic adviser in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

 

B.S. in Environmental Engineering

Required Courses

A total of 130 credit hours are required for graduation with the degree Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering.

Recommended Sequence of Courses

The HSS Advanced Requirement of 13 credits is shown below as three 3-credit courses and one 4-credit course. Other options are possible.

First Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
ENGL 0013ENGL 0023
MATH 0214MATH 0224
CHM 0304PHY 011
  & PHY 012
5
ENGR 0052ENGR 0102
FE Free Elective3 
 16 14
Second Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
MATH 0234MATH 2053
CHM 110
  & CHM 111
4PHY 021
  & PHY 022
5
CEE 0122CEE 1704
ECO 0014CEE 2722
Select one of the following: HSS Humanities/Social Sciences Elective14
CEE 003, MECH 002, or MECH 0033 
 17 18
Third Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
CEE 1213CEE 2023
CEE 1423CEE 2223
CEE 3753CEE 2743
CHE 0313CHE 2803
EES 0221CEE 2752
ESR Earth Science Requirement33EBR Environmental Biology Requirement43
 16 17
Fourth Year
First SemesterCreditsSecond SemesterCredits
CEE 2032CEE 3773
CEE 3783HSS Humanities/Social Science Elective16
CEE 3793AE Approved Electives26
AE Approved Elective23 
HSS Humanities/Social Sciences Elective13 
FE Free Elective3 
 17 15
Total Credits: 130

1

HSS Advanced requirement is 13 credits, four credits of which must be an approved environmental studies course; list of approved courses are available from CEE department.

2

Nine approved elective credits to satisfy proficiency in four focus areas of water supply and resources, environmental chemistry, waste management and biological processes; approved list available from CEE department.

3

Earth Science Requirement, list of approved courses are available from CEE department.

4

Environmental Biology Requirement, list of approved courses are available from CEE department.

The selection of elective courses is to be in consultation with student’s academic adviser in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

 

Technical Minor in Environmental Engineering

A technical minor in Environmental Engineering is available for students outside the department.  At least two of the courses must be from the CEE department.

CHM 031Chemical Equilibria in Aqueous Systems (Prerequisite)4
Select three of the following required courses:9-10
Introduction to Environmental Engineering
Environmental Water Chemistry
Fundamentals of Air Pollution
Environmental Engineering Processes
Select one additional course from the required list or from the following:3
Hydraulic Engineering
Environmental Groundwater Hydrology
Surface Water Quality Modeling
Geo-Environmental Engineering
Environmental Separation and Control
Reaction Kinetics in Environmental Engineering
Other courses may be selected with the minor adviser's approval.

Graduate Programs

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) has graduate degree programs leading to Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in: Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering, and Environmental Engineering.

The department offers advanced work in the specialty areas of structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, water resources engineering, and environmental engineering. Degrees offered are:

M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D. in Structural Engineering

M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D. in Civil Engineering

M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering

The programs educate students through coursework and independent study and research. Our programs are designed to provide students with the knowledge and analytical problem-solving capabilities needed to lead and innovate within multi-disciplinary teams in technologically-complex environments.

Graduate studies in the department of civil and environmental engineering enable the student to build upon the broad background of undergraduate education in preparation for professional practice at an advanced level, for research and development, or for teaching.

A graduate program leading to the M.S. normally is concentrated in one, or possibly two, of the technical specialty areas, and consists of a number of courses designed to fulfill the individual student’s program objectives. Each candidate for the M.S. is required to submit a thesis representing three to six credit hours (CEE 491), or alternatively, a report based on a research course of at least three credits (CEE 429, CEE 439, CEE 449, CEE 479 or CEE 481). The balance of the program will consist of courses in the specialty area(s).

A graduate program leading to the M.Eng. degree stresses engineering applications and design. The department offers two different M.Eng. degrees. The M.Eng. in Structural Engineering focuses specifically on structural engineering. Candidates for the M.Eng. in Structural Engineering degree complete a group design project and an individual project as part of a 3-course design project sequence (CEE 416, CEE 417, CEE 418). The M.Eng. degrees in Civil Engineering and Environmental Engineering allow students to select courses across the various specialty areas of civil and environmental engineering. Candidates for the M.Eng. degrees in Civil Engineering and Environmental Engineering  have the option to complete an individual engineering project or a research report, representing 3 to 6 credits (CEE 480), or may take 30 course credits with no project or report.

The doctoral program, which leads to the Ph.D., normally includes courses in the major field, courses in minor fields, and a dissertation presenting results of original research. Holders of master’s degrees planning to become candidates for the Ph.D. take a qualifying examination. After qualification, the candidate, the candidate’s departmental Ph.D. committee, and the department chair formulate the program of work.

The departmental laboratories are located in the Fritz Engineering Laboratory and in the STEPS Building. The laboratories offer outstanding facilities for research and instruction in structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, water resources engineering, and environmental engineering. In particular, the structural testing equipment includes dynamic testing machines, a five-million-pound universal hydraulic testing machine, and other state-of-the-art facilities. Included in the latter are the facilities of the Center for Advanced Technology for Large Structural Systems (ATLSS center) located on the mountaintop campus. These include the largest 3-dimensional test bed in the U.S.A. and specialized earthquake testing facilities of the NSF George E. Brown, Jr. Network Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). The water resources facilities include a wave tank, several flumes, a 10-cfs recirculating flow system, and two multipurpose tanks for model studies. The geotechnical facilities include state-of-the-art, fully automated triaxial compression and permeability machines for multiple simultaneous tests.  The environmental facilities include state-of-the-art laboratories and analytical instrumentation for analysis of chemical, physical and microbiological systems.

In addition to departmental courses, a number of courses offered by the departments of mechanical engineering and mechanics, chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science and engineering, earth and environmental sciences, and biology may also be considered a part of the major field in civil and environmental engineering. A number of research and teaching assistantships are available to provide financial support to students of outstanding promise. The research or teaching activities required of holders of assistantships provides a valuable educational experience that supplements the formal course offerings. A very limited number of scholarships and fellowships are available to provide financial support for full-time study.

Courses

CEE 003 Engineering Statics 3 Credits

Force and moment vectors, resultants. Principles of statics and free-body diagrams. Applications to simple trusses, frames, and machines. Distributed loads. Internal forces in beams. Properties of areas, second moments. Laws of friction. Course is intended as a prerequisite for CEE 059. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: PHY 011 and MATH 022
Can be taken Concurrently: MATH 022

CEE 010 Engineering/Architectural Graphics and Design 3 Credits

Graphical communication of civil engineering and architectural projects using manual techniques and commercial state-of-the-art computer software. Topics include visualization and sketching; orthographic, isometric and other drawings; points, lines and planes in descriptive geometry; site design; overview of geographical information systems and 3-D applications. Teamwork on design projects with oral and graphical presentations. Open to a limited number of architecture, design arts or other students with project roles consistent with students’ background. Not available to students who have taken ME 010.

CEE 011 Surveying 1 Credit

Theory and practice of basic engineering surveying measurements and analysis. Topics to include field note taking, datums and measurement precision, equipment and techniques for measuring distance, elevation and angles, electronic distance measurement, topographic surveys, GPS and hydrographic surveys. Hands on experience with the use of survey levels, transits/theodolites and a total station will be provided.

CEE 012 Civil Engineering Statistics 2 Credits

Basic engineering statistics with a civil engineering orientation. Topics to include: random variables and histograms; central tendency, dispersion and skew; probability density functions and cumulative distribution functions, basic probability concepts and selected probability models, return period analysis, linear regression and least squares, correlation analysis, propagation of errors.

CEE 059 Strength of Materials 3 Credits

Principles stress and strain; Hooke’s law, Mohr’s circle for stress, transverse shear in beams, extension, torsion, and bending; beam deflections, column buckling, combined stresses, and plastic yield criteria. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (CEE 003 or MECH 003) and MATH 023
Can be taken Concurrently: MATH 023

CEE 104 Readings in Civil Engineering 1-4 Credit

Study of selected technical papers, with abstracts and reports.

CEE 117 Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering 2 Credits

Techniques for computer solution of linear and non-linear simultaneous equations; eigenvalue analysis; finite differences; numerical integration; numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations. Case studies in the various branches of civil engineering. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

CEE 121 Mechanics of Fluids 3 Credits

Fluid properties and statics; concepts and basic equations for fluid dynamics. Forces caused by flowing fluids and energy required to transport fluids. Dynamics similitude and modeling of fluid flows. Includes laboratory experiments to demonstrate basic concepts. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: MECH 002 or MECH 003 or CEE 003

CEE 123 Civil Engineering Materials 3 Credits

Properties of commonly used civil engineering materials including aggregate, Portland cement concrete, asphalt, concrete, wood, metals, and polymer based synthetics. Standard test methods. Includes laboratory work and reporting of results. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 059 or MECH 012

CEE 142 Soil Mechanics 3 Credits

Physical properties of soils; mineralogy, composition and fabric. Phase and weight-volume relationships, consistency, gradation and classification of soils. Fluid flow through porous media. Stress-strain behavior; stresses within a soil mass, deformation behavior, measurement of stress-strain properties, shear strength of soil. Volume change in soils; compressibility, pore water pressure, consolidation and settlement. Laboratory experiments to measure physical and mechanical properties of soils. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: MECH 002 or MECH 003 or CEE 003

CEE 159 Structural Analysis I 4 Credits

Elastic analysis of statically determinate beams, frames, and trusses; deflections by the methods of virtual work and moment area; influence lines for determinate structures; modeling for structural analysis; flexibility, stiffness, and approximate methods of analysis of indeterminate structures. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: MECH 012 or CEE 059

CEE 170 Introduction to Environmental Engineering 4 Credits

Characterization and evaluation of natural water resources. Principles of basic water chemistry. Water and wastewater treatment processes. Sludge treatment, air pollution and multi-media transport. Pollutants mass balance and oxygen transfer. Field trips to water and wastewater process facilities. Laboratory experiments on water and wastewater characterization. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CHM 030

CEE 171 Fundamentals of Environmental Technology 4 Credits

Introduction to water and air quality, water, air and soil pollution. Chemistry of common pollutants. Technologies for water purification, wastewater treatment, solid hazardous waste management, environmental remediation, and air quality control. Global changes, energy and environment. Constraints of environmental protection on technology development and applications. Constraints of economic development on environmental quality. Environmental life cycle analysis and environmental policy. Not available to students in RCEAS.

CEE 202 CEE Planning and Engineering Economics 3 Credits

The planning and management of civil engineering projects. Modeling and optimization methods, project management techniques. Financial decision-making among alternatives. Present value and discounted cash flow analysis; incremental analysis and rate-of-return criteria.

CEE 203 Professional Development 2 Credits

Elements of professionalism; professional ethics; engineering registration; continuing education; responsibilities of an engineer in industry, government, private practice; role of professional and technical societies.

CEE 205 Design Problems 1-6 Credit

Supervised individual design problems, with report. Consent of the department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 207 Transportation Engineering 3 Credits

Principles of the design of transportation facilities with emphasis on highways and airports in the areas of geometric, drainage, and pavement design. Design problems. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 011

CEE 211 Research Problems 1-6 Credit

Supervised individual research problems, with report. Consent of the department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 222 Hydraulic Engineering 3 Credits

Pipe and pump hydraulics, engineering hydrology, ground water hydraulics, and open channel hydraulics. Laboratory experiments in applied hydraulics. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 121 or ME 231

CEE 242 Geotechnical Engineering 3 Credits

The principles related to analysis and evaluation of earthen infrastructure. Site characterization and in-situ testing of soils. Advanced stress-strain behavior, failure theories and stress path application. 2D fluid flow in porous media, flow nets, uplift forces, and liquefaction. Stability of earthen structures; slopes, dams and levees. Stability of retaining structures; lateral earth pressures. Introduction to shallow foundations; bearing capacity and settlement. Team project. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 142

CEE 244 Foundation Engineering 3 Credits

Application of theories and principles of soil mechanics to geotechnical and structural foundation design. In-situ soil testing, subsurface exploration and soil sampling. Bearing capacity, settlement, lateral earth pressure principles. Design of shallow foundations: spread footings, beams on elastic foundations, mat foundations. Introduction to retaining walls: mechanically stabilized earth, concrete and sheet pile walls, walls for excavations. Design of deep foundations: single piles, pile foundations, drilled piers and caissons. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 242

CEE 258 Structural Laboratory 3 Credits

Experimental study of behavior of members and structures. Planning, executing, and reporting experimental studies. Introduction to instrumentation and data acquisition. Nondestructive testing of civil engineering structures. Steel, rein-forced concrete, and other materials. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 262 and CEE 264

CEE 259 Structural Analysis II 3 Credits

Analysis of statically indeterminate structures, methods of slope deflection and moment distribution; consideration of side-sway and nonprismatic members. Influence lines for determinate and indeterminate structures. Flexibility and stiffness matrix methods for computerized analysis. Use of computer library programs. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 159

CEE 262 Fundamentals of Structural Steel Design 3 Credits

Introduction to steel structures. Behavior, strength and design of structural members, including members subjected to axial tension, axial compression, flexure and combined compression and flexure. Basic methods of joining members to form a structural system. Use of design specifications. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 159

CEE 264 Fundamentals of Structural Concrete Design 3 Credits

Analysis, design, and detailing of reinforced concrete members and simple systems for strength and serviceability requirements, including beams, columns, and slabs. Introduction to prestressed concrete. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 159

CEE 266 Construction Management 3 Credits

An overview of management and construction techniques used in engineering ventures and projects. Scheduling, estimation, construction methods, financial controls, contracts, labor relations and organizational forms. Case studies and lecturers from industry. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 202

CEE 272 Environmental Risk Assessment 2 Credits

Effects of chemical releases on human health; ecological risks. Application of risk assessment methodology, including hazard identification, exposure assessment, toxicity assessment, and risk characterization. Accounting for uncertainty in data during risk management, risk reduction and implementation of regulations and environmental policy.

CEE 274 Environmental Water Chemistry 3 Credits

Chemical principles and applications of those principles to the analysis and understanding of aqueous environmental chemistry in natural waters and wastewaters. The chemistry of ionic equilibria, redox reactions, precipitation/dissolution, acid-base concepts, buffer capacity, complexation, hydrolysis and biological reactions. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CHM 031 or CEE 170

CEE 275 Environmental, Geotechnics and Hydraulics Laboratory 2 Credits

Applying fundamentals of soil properties, hydraulics and environmental science through appropriate laboratory experiments for solution of environmental engineering problems. Experiments will include solute transport in surface and subsurface medium; characterization of soils, sludges and water; treatment of water and wastewater including biological processes. Illustration of techniques to generate design parameters for scale-up. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 170

CEE 279 Microbial Ecology 4 Credits

The role of microorganisms in the environment. Topics include: Survey of microbial classification, structure, and metabolism; study of microbes at population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization; the role of microbes in biogeochemical cycles; application of microbes to bioremediation and resource recovery problems. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: EES 152

CEE 281 Special Topics 1-6 Credit

A study of selected topics in civil and environmental engineering not included in other formal courses. A design project or an interdisciplinary study of a problem related to civil or environmental engineering may be included. Civil and environmental engineering students working on design projects involving students from other departments or colleges working in cross-disciplinary teams may be included. A report is required. Consent of the department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 290 CEE Design Project 3 Credits

Supervised design projects. Multidisciplinary teams applying the fundamentals of engineering science and the concepts of planning and systems analysis in the design of practical engineering works. The scope includes needs analysis, formulation of the design problem statement and evaluative criteria; analysis of alternative solutions and the generation of specifications. Includes most of the following considerations: economic, sustainability, manufacturability, ethical, social, environmental, aesthetic, political, health and safety. Practicing professional engineers are invited to serve as consultants. Written and oral reports are required. Must have senior standing in CEE department or consent of instructors.

CEE 316 Hydrogeology 3,4 Credits

Water plays a critical role in the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur at the Earth’s surface. This course is an introduction to surface and groundwater hydrology in natural systems, providing fundamental concepts and a process-level understanding using the hydrologic cycle as a framework. Geochemistry will be integrated to address natural variations and the human impact on the environment. Topics covered include: watershed hydrology, regional and local groundwater flow, water chemistry, and management of water resources. Lectures and recitation/laboratory. Prerequisites as noted below, or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: EES 100 and (EES 105 or EES 115 or EES 131 or EES 152 or EES 172)
Can be taken Concurrently: EES 100, EES 105, EES 115, EES 131, EES 152, EES 172
Attribute/Distribution: NS

CEE 320 Engineering Hydrology 3 Credits

Rainfall-runoff analysis, overland flow, hydrograph theories, modeling. Frequency analysis of extreme events. Flood routing. Design storms. Floodplain hydraulics, floodplain delineation. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (CEE 222)
Attribute/Distribution: NS

CEE 321 Open Channel Hydraulics 3 Credits

Energy and momentum concepts, frictional resistance in open channels. Rapidly and gradually varied flow in open channels; unsteady flow in open channels; channel and culvert design. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 222

CEE 323 Environmental Groundwater Hydrology 3 Credits

The study of subsurface water, its environment, distribution, and movement. Included are flow patterns, well hydraulics, and an introduction to the movement of contaminants. Design problems are included to simulate flow with analytical and numerical models, and contaminant migration using analytical models. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 121 or CEE 316 or EES 316 or ME 231 or CHE 044
Attribute/Distribution: NS

CEE 327 Surface Water Quality Modeling 3 Credits

Fundamentals of modeling water quality parameters in receiving water bodies, including rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Modeling of dissolved oxygen, nutrients, temperature, and toxic substances. Emphasis on water quality control decisions as well as mechanics and model building. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: (CEE 121 or ME 231 or CHE 044) and CEE 222

CEE 335 Coastal Engineering 3 Credits

Linear wave theory and wave characteristics; survey of nonlinear theories; tides, tsunamis, storm surge and basin resonance; wind-generated wave spectra, statistics and forecasting; wave-structure interaction; nearshore circulation and sediment transport; interaction of littoral processes with structures. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 121 or ME 231 or CHE 044

CEE 341 Ground Improvement and Site Development 3 Credits

Soil stabilization; grouting and injection methods; preloading and dynamic consolidation; deep compaction; drainage and dewatering; application of geotextiles and geomembranes; soil nailing and reinforcement methods. Use of in-situ test for soil properties and site characterization; procedures and calibration methods for the basic in-situ tests - SPT, CPT, CPTU, DMT; theoretical, experimental and empirical interpretive methods for in-situ test results. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 242

CEE 342 Experimental Geotechnical Engineering 3 Credits

Experimental studies dealing with the measurement of soil and other particulate materials properties, and behavior in the laboratory. Test procedures, calibration, data acquisition, interpretation of apparatus limitations and potential error sources, specimen preparation, data analysis and interpretation; designing experiments. Senior standing required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 242

CEE 344 Behavior of Soils as Engineering Materials 3 Credits

Soil mineralogy, bondage, crystal structure and surface characteristics; clay-water electrolyte system; soil fabric and its measurement; soil structure and physical property relationships; soil depositional and compositional characteristics; engineering properties of soils as they relate to soil mineralogy, fabric and composition: volume change behavior, intergranular stresses, shear strength and deformation behavior, conduction behavior, coupled and direct flow phenomena. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 242

CEE 345 Geo-Environmental Engineering 3 Credits

Principles of interaction of soil and rock with various environmental cycles. Physical and chemical properties of soil. Soil fabric and its measurement, clay-water electrolyte system, electrical double layer and DLVO theory; contaminated site characterization, groundwater flow and contaminant transport; detection and quantification technologies; waste containment systems, landfills, liner systems, leachate collection; soil and groundwater cleanup technologies. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 242

CEE 346 Fundamentals of Designing with Geosynthetics 3 Credits

Fundamental and current theories of designing soil structures with geosynthetics. Roads and highway applications; reinforced embankments; slope stabilization; waste containment systems; erosion control; filtration and drainage. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 242

CEE 352 Structural Dynamics 3 Credits

Analysis of linear structural systems to time-dependent loads. Free and forced vibration. Classical and numerical methods of solution. Lumped-mass techniques, energy methods, and introduction to matrix formulation of dynamic problems. Application to design. Prerequisites as noted below or graduate student status required.
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and CEE 159 and MECH 102

CEE 354 Sensors, Signals, and Systems 3 Credits

Characterization of sensing systems and analysis and processing of sensor data. Topics include formulation of signals in time and frequency domains: sampling, Nyquist theorem, interpolation, band-limited signals. Analysis of systems: LTI systems, convolution, Eigenfunctions, poles and zeros. Design and analysis of digital filters: ideal filters, FIR filters, filter behavior. Spectral analysis and system identification: stationary processes, power spectral density, frequency leakage. Fundamentals of sensing systems: piezoelectricity, actuation, measurement parameters.

CEE 361 Bridge Systems Design 3 Credits

Introduction to bridge structural systems in steel and concrete. Loads and specifications. Design and analysis of bridge structural components. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 259 and CEE 262 and CEE 264

CEE 363 Building Systems Design 3 Credits

Building structural systems in steel, reinforced concrete and composite steel and concrete. Design loads (dead, live and environmental) and methodologies. Structural systems behavior and design. Design of floor systems, beam-columns, connections, walls, and overall frames. Final design. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 259 and CEE 262 and CEE 264

CEE 364 Advanced Project Management 3 Credits

Interrelations of planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning. Project life cycle cost analysis. Cost estimating and financial management principles. Economic feasibility studies. Advanced construction methods and construction contracting. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: (CEE 266)

CEE 365 Prestressed Concrete 3 Credits

Principles of prestressing. Analysis and design of basic flexural members. Instantaneous and time-dependent properties of materials. Prestress losses. Additional topics may include continuity, partial prestressing, compression members, circular prestressing, etc. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of department chair.
Prerequisites: CEE 264

CEE 366 Finite Element Method in Structural Engineering 3 Credits

The finite element method: fundamental concepts, theory, modeling, and computation for the analysis of structures. One, two, and three-dimensional finite elements. Isoparametric formulation and implementation for various kinds of elements. Applications to problems in the behavior of structural elements and systems including analysis of trusses, beams, plates, and frames and bridge systems. Extensions to nonlinear analysis and advanced topics. Use of contemporary commercial software. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 259

CEE 370 Environmental Separation and Control 3 Credits

Theory and application of adsorption, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, air stripping and chemical oxidation in water and wastewater treatment. Modeling engineered treatment processes. Credit will not be given for both CEE 473 and CEE 370. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 371

CEE 371 Reaction Kinetics in Environmental Engineering 3 Credits

Theory of reaction kinetics and its application to the design and operation of chemical, physico-chemical and biological reactions in water, wastewater, and hazardous waste treatment. Basic design equations for various types of reactors and migration of pollutants in the environment. CEE 471 is a graduate version of this course. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 375 or CHE 375

CEE 373 Fundamentals of Air Pollution 3 Credits

Introduction to the problems of air pollution including such topics as: sources and dispersion of pollutants, sampling and analysis; technology of economics and control processes; legislation and standards. Must have senior standing in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

CEE 375 Environmental Engineering Processes 3 Credits

Processes applied in environmental engineering for air pollution control, treatment of drinking water, municipal wastewater, industrial wastes, hazardous/toxic wastes, and environmental remediation. Kinetics, reactor theory, mass balances, application of fundamental physical, chemical and biological principles to analysis and design. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 170

CEE 376 Environmental Biotechnology 3 Credits

Fundamentals of microbiology and biochemistry applied to natural and engineered environmental systems. Systems ecology, energetics and kinetics of microbial growth, nutrition and toxicology, use of microorganisms for pollution monitoring and control. Pathogenicity and disease transmission, water quality using biological indices. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 375 or CHE 375

CEE 377 Environmental Engineering Design 3 Credits

Team-oriented course to develop design skills in the area of environmental engineering. Project components typically include: air pollution, drinking water, municipal wastewater, industrial wastes, hazardous/toxic wastes, and environmental remediation. Project work typically includes: a background report, a design report , and an oral presentation. Tools used in the design process may include simulation models. Must have senior standing in CEE department or consent of instructor. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 375

CEE 378 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Management 3 Credits

Regulations for collection, transportation, disposal and storage of hazardous wastes. Containment systems, monitoring, new and available technologies to minimize, transform, destroy, detoxify and eliminate the hazardous components of the wastes. Environmentally benign processes and life cycle analysis. CEE 478 is a graduate version of this course. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 375 or CHE 375

CEE 379 Environmental Case Studies 3-4 Credits

Case studies will be used to explore the impact of politics, economics, society, technology, and ethics on environmental projects and preferences. Environmental issues in both affluent and developing countries will be analyzed. Multidisciplinary student teams will investigate site characterization; environmental remediation design; environmental policy; and political, financial, social, and ethical implications of environmental projects. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: (EES 022 or CEE 375 or CHE 375)
Attribute/Distribution: NS

CEE 381 Special Topics 1-3 Credit

A study of selected topics in civil engineering, not included in other formal courses. A report is required. Consent of the department chair required.

CEE 385 Research Procedures Seminar 1 Credit

Planning and execution of research projects, survey of current research, elements of proposals and budgets. Literature search procedures. Presentation of data, and of written and oral reports. Guidelines for visual aids.

CEE 404 Mechanics and Behavior of Structural Members 3 Credits

Behavior of structural members, under a variety of loading conditions in the elastic and inelastic range. Introduction to the theory of elasticity and plasticity. Basics of linear elastic fracture mechanics and fatigue. Analysis of structural member behavior in axial, bending, shear, and torsion. Stability analysis of beam-columns. Beams on elastic foundations. Energy concepts and their use in structural analysis.

CEE 405 Analytical and Numerical Methods I 3 Credits

Analytical and numerical methods used in Civil Engineering, with emphasis on ordinary and partial differential equations. Analytical and numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Initial and boundary value problems. Numerical integration, numerical error, and approximations of functions and data points. Finite differences, solution of systems of linear equations, eigenvalue problems, and solution of nonlinear equations. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

CEE 406 Structural Reliability of Components and Systems 3 Credits

Probabilistic time –invariant failure analysis of structural components and systems. Statistics and probability; component time-invariant reliability analysis; system time-invariant reliability analysis; reliability-based structural design; and reliability of structural systems using Monte-Carlo simulation. Solutions suitable for practical computer implementation. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (MATH 021 and MATH 205 and CEE 259)

CEE 409 Finite Element Method in Structural Mechanics 3 Credits

Basic principles and equations governing the finite element method. Analysis of planar, axisymmetric, plate and articulated structures, with emphasis on analytical modeling. Accuracy and convergence studies, utilizing different discretizations and various types of elements. Case studies include application and extension to material nonlinearities, bridges, containment vessels, and soil-structure interaction. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 405

CEE 412 Methodologies of Structural Design 2 Credits

Probabilistic analysis of uncertainties associated with structural design. Characterization of loads including dead and live loads, wind, earthquake, and vehicular loads. Variability of structural resistance based on strength limit states as well as serviceability. Assessment of safety and reliability. Deterministic and probabilistic methodologies of design.

CEE 414 Analysis and Design of Steel and Composite Structural Members 3 Credits

Fundamentals of limit state design. Ultimate strength analysis of steel and steel-and-concrete composite columns, beams, beam-columns, and members subjected to torsion and combined torsion and bending. Flexural and torsional instability. Background and requirements of current design codes.

CEE 415 Analysis and Design of Ductile Steel Structural Systems 3 Credits

Inelastic behavior of steel and steel structural members. Plastic limit strength analysis of continuous beams and frames. Effect of variable repeated loading. Methodology and code requirements for design based on plastic strength. Applications to seismic-resistant building structures. Current research. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 262

CEE 416 Design Project I 3 Credits

Introduction to the overall M.Eng. design project for a civil infrastructure facility. Design decision making and communication processes. Roles of various players in the execution of the project (e.g. owner, architect, engineer, fabricator, construction manager, contractor), and the mechanisms of communication of information in the design process (e.g. design drawings, shop drawings, erection drawings, as-built drawings). Roles of codes and standards. Enrollment limited to students in M.Eng. program.

CEE 417 Design Project II 3 Credits

Task-specific teams will be organized to perform preliminary designs of different design options for the ocerall design project. Determination of project goals, performance requirements, and functional specifications. Winnowing and selection of alternatives for final design. Professor of practice and external specialists will guide examination and evaluation of design options based on cost and performance criteria. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (CEE 416)

CEE 418 Design Project III 3 Credits

Comprehensive, completed design of the civil infrastructure facility. Design project teams will address life cycle issues and integrated, multidisciplinary aspects of architecture, systems design, construction and management. Critical design reviews will be performed by teams of external specialists and members of the industrial advisory board. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (CEE 417)

CEE 419 Structural Behavior Laboratory 3 Credits

Experimental study of behavior of members, assemblages and structural systems. Introduction to methods and equipment used in laboratory simulations, numerical simulations, laboratory and in-situ measurements. Planning, executing and reporting experimental studies on performance of materials and large-scale structural systems. Non-destructive evaluation and damage assessment. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: (CEE 262 and CEE 264)

CEE 420 Surface Wave Mechanics 3 Credits

Elements of hydrodynamics and wave boundary conditions; linear wave theory and wave characteristics; nonlinear wave theories and application; wind wave generation, analysis and prediction; long waves; design wave determination; laboratory investigation of surface waves. Consent of instructor required.

CEE 424 Surface Water Hydrology 3 Credits

Advanced analysis and methods in surface water hydrology. Linear and non-linear hydrograph methods. Kinematic wave and other hydraulic routing techniques. Advanced techniques for evaporation, infiltration, and snow melt. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 320 or EES 320

CEE 425 Hydraulics of Sediment Transport 3 Credits

Hydrodynamic forces on particles, settling velocity. Sediment transport in open channel: tractive force theory, bed load and suspension theory, total load and wash load. Bedform mechanics, cohesive channel hydraulics. Sediment transport in closed conduits. Shore processes and coastline hydraulics. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 321

CEE 427 Transport of Contaminants in Groundwater 3 Credits

Theory of groundwater flow and transport of contaminants in the groundwater system. State-of-the-art groundwater flow and contaminant transport models used to solve governing equations of groundwater flow and transport of chemically reactive solutes. Selected case studies will be analyzed. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 323 or EES 323

CEE 428 Advanced Topics in Hydraulics 1-3 Credit

Recent developments in hydromechanics and hydraulics. Topics to be selected from: wave mechanics, theory of flow through porous media, dispersion, hydrodynamic forces on structures, potential flow, free streamline theory, open channel hydraulics, computer methods. May be repeated for credit. Consent of department required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: CEE 321

CEE 429 Hydraulic Research 1-6 Credit

Individual research problems with reports.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 431 Life-Cycle of Structural Systems 3 Credits

Assessing the life-cycle performance of new and existing structural systems, designing structures for lifetime performance, and optimizing the remaining life of existing structures, considering uncertainties in structural performance, demands placed on structural systems, structural maintenance and monitoring, and costs. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and CEE 259

CEE 432 Structural Safety and Risk 3 Credits

Assessing safety and risk of structural systems during their specified service life, designing structures for specified safety and risk criteria for a prescribed service life, introducing Markov, queueing and availability models, statistics of extremes, time-variant safety and structural health monitoring, and optimal decision making under uncertainty based on single objective or multiple objectives. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: MATH 205 and CEE 259

CEE 433 Structural Optimization 3 Credits

Problem formulation, relative merit of various numerical optimization techniques, possible difficulties in applications, and how alternative formulations and methods can be combined to solve different design problems. Numerical optimization techniques are in general terms and their application to structural design. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: (MATH 205 and CEE 259)

CEE 436 Advanced Topics in Coastal Engineering 1-3 Credit

Advanced study of selected topics in coastal engineering such as: non-linear wave theory, design of coastal structures, shore protection and stabilization, numerical solution of coastal hydrodynamics. Selection of topics will depend on particular qualifications of staff, as well as on the interests of the students.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 439 Coastal Engineering Research 1-6 Credit

Individual research problems with reports.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 441 Dynamic Analysis in Geotechnical Engineering 3 Credits

Vibration of elementary systems, 1D wave propagation, dynamic soil properties, analysis of response of shallow and deep foundations to dynamic loads, soil liquefaction and earthquake problems; laboratory tests, geophysical methods and non-destructive tests of foundation systems; dynamic analysis of pile driving. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of department chair.
Prerequisites: CEE 244

CEE 443 Advanced Soil Mechanics 3 Credits

Characterization of particulate media; particle-fluid interaction; load deformation, thermoelastic and viscoelastic behavior; elastic waves in particulate media; electromagnetic properties; empirical and analytical models. Must have completed a course in soil mechanics.

CEE 445 Advanced Foundation Engineering 3 Credits

Current theory and practice relating to the design of shallow and deep foundations for buildings and other structures. Analysis and limitation of settlements; bearing capacity; flexible and rigid retaining structure design; dynamic effects; anchor and other special foundations; site investigations; load-resistance-factor design (LRFD) criteria for foundations. Must have completed a course in soil mechanics.

CEE 447 Advanced Topics in Geotechnical Engineering 1-3 Credit

Advanced studies in selected subjects related to geotechnical engineering. The general areas may include: stress-strain-time relationships of soils, colloidal phenomena in soils, ground water flow and see page, soil dynamics, soil plasticity, numerical methods applied to soil mechanics, earth dam design, theories of layered systems and their application to pavement design, rock mechanics. The studies specifically undertaken in any particular semester depend on the availability of staff and the interest of students. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 448 Constitutive Laws in Soil Mechanics 3 Credits

Basic methods and constitutive laws used for the analysis of boundary value problems in soil mechanics. Linear elasticity, nonlinear elastic, linear elastic-perfectly plastic and non-linear elastoplastic models; critical state soil mechanics; application of select computational models. Consent of instructor required.

CEE 449 Geotechnical Research 1-6 Credit

Individual research problems relating to soil engineering, with report. Must have completed a course in soil mechanics.

CEE 450 Advanced Structural Analysis I 3 Credits

Theory and methods of linear and second order structural analysis. Linear theory and stiffness properties of structural members and linear transformations of structural analysis. Application of virtual work principles and development of displacement (stiffness) method of analysis in matrix form. Introduction to second order theory of structural members and second order equations of structural analysis. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 259

CEE 452 Fatigue and Fracture of Structures - An Interdisciplinary View 3 Credits

This course examines the fatigue and fracture characteristics of steel structures from metallurgical, mechanical and structural engineering views. Both theory and experimental background are provided and applied to case studies and code development.

CEE 453 Nonlinear Analysis of Structural Components and Systems 3 Credits

Nonlinear analysis of structural components and systems, considering the effects of material and geometric nonlinearities. Solution strategies; material constitutive models; nonlinear member section analysis; computational plasticity; nonlinear beam-column element formulations; second order analysis; structural stability; and nonlinear time history analysis of structural dynamic systems. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 352 and CEE 404 and CEE 450

CEE 454 Sensors, Signals, and Systems 3 Credits

Characterization of sensing systems and analysis and processing of sensor data. Topics include formulation of signals in time and frequency domains: sampling, Nyquist theorem, interpolation, band-limited signals. Analysis of systems: LTI systems, convolution, Eigenfunctions, poles and zeros. Design and analysis of digital filters: ideal filters, FIR filters, filter behavior. Spectral analysis and system identification: stationary processes, power spectral density, frequency leakage. Fundamentals of sensing systems: piezoelectricity, actuation, measurement parameters. This course, a version of CEE 354 for graduate students, requires advanced assignments. Credit will not be given for both CEE 354 and CEE 454.

CEE 455 Advanced Structural Dynamics 3 Credits

Analysis and design of structures to resist wind, earthquake, and blast loading. Matrix methods and computer applications. Non-linear and elasto-plastic response. Damping characteristics of structures and structural components, spectral analysis, dynamic instability. Characteristics of aerodynamic and seismic forces and explosions. Introduction to vibration of three-dimensional structural systems. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (CEE 352 or MECH 406) and CEE 405 and CEE 450

CEE 456 Behavior and Design of Earthquake Resistant Structures 3 Credits

Characteristics of earthquakes, effects of earthquakes on structures. Response of linear elastic structures to earthquakes. Response of inelastic structures to earthquakes. Behavior of structural components under cyclic loading. Principles of earthquake-resistant design. Seismic design procedures and their implementation in codes. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 352

CEE 457 Behavior and Design of Blast Resistant Structures 3 Credits

Design and assessment of structures subject to blast demands generated from accidental or intentional detonation of high explosives. Topics include determination of blast demands, characterization of pressure distributions on structural systems and components, estimation of the response of systems to dynamic pressure demands, modeling techniques for structural components, dynamic time history analysis of systems, determination of allowable response limits and stand-off requirements for facilities, and design structures to resist the effects of close-in detonation of high explosives and the impact of ballistic fragments.

CEE 459 Advanced Topics in Plastic Theory 3 Credits

Fundamentals of the mathematical theory of plasticity; the general theorems of limit analysis and their applications to beams under combined loading, arches, space frames, plates and shells. Limit analysis of two- and three-dimensional problems in soil, concrete, rock, and metal. Current developments. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 404

CEE 461 Advanced Bridge Engineering 3 Credits

Students in CEE 461 cover the same topics described under CEE 361, but in more depth. In addition each student conducts an intensive study of a bridge-related topic of his or her choice. A short written technical report on the findings of this study is required. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 262 and CEE 264

CEE 462 Stability of Structural Systems 3 Credits

Stability analysis of structures systems, including moment-resisting and braced frames, trusses, and plate and box girders. Bracing requirements. Elastic and inelastic second-order analysis. Design considerations. Special topics. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 404

CEE 463 Advanced Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete 3 Credits

Consistent mechanics for the design of reinforced concrete with or without prestress. Limit theorems of the theory of plasticity and their application to beams, slabs, and disturbed regions. Applications may include beams in flexure and combined flexure, axial load, and torsion; slabs (strip method, yield line analysis); corbels, deep beams, and other disturbed regions (truss models, strut-and-tie models, and associated failure mechanisms). Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 404

CEE 467 Advanced Topics in Structural Engineering 1-3 Credit

Advanced study of selected topics in structural mechanics and engineering, such as: finite element methods, suspension system; space frames; stability of nonlinear systems; coldformed and lightweight construction; optimization and reliability; second-order phenomena in structures; interaction of structures with the environment; structural use of plastics; composite construction, etc. Selection of topics will depend on particular qualifications of the staff, as well as on the interests of the students. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 468 Stability of Elastic Structures 3 Credits

Basic concepts of instability of a structure; bifurcation, energy increment, snap-through, dynamic instability. Analytical and numerical methods of finding buckling loads of columns. Postbuckling deformations of cantilever column. Dynamic buckling with nonconservative forces. Effects of initial imperfections. Inelastic buckling. Buckling by torsion and flexure. Variational methods. Buckling of frames. Instability problems of thin plates and shells. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: MATH 205

CEE 470 Reaction Kinetics in Environmental Engineering 3 Credits

Theory of reaction kinetics and its application to the design and operation of chemical, physico-chemical and biological reactors in water and wastewater treatment. Basic design equations for various types of reactors and migration of pollutants in the environment.

CEE 471 Environmental Risk Assessment 3 Credits

Effects of chemical releases on human health; ecological risks. Application of risk assessment methodology, including hazard identification, exposure assessment, toxicity assessment, and risk characterization. Accounting for uncertainty in data during risk management, risk reduction and implementation of regulations and environmental policy. Term project.

CEE 472 Water and Wastewater Treatment Facilities 3 Credits

Theory and design of water and wastewater treatment facilities. Physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater treatment. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 375 or CHE 375

CEE 473 Environmental Separation and Control 3 Credits

Theory and application of adsorption, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, air stripping and chemical oxidation in water and wastewater treatment. Modeling engineered treatment processes. This course, a version of CEE 370 for graduate students, requires advanced assignments. Credit will not be given for both CEE 473 and CEE 370. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 470

CEE 474 Aquatic Chemistry 3 Credits

Applying basic principles of aqueous chemistry for quantifying complex, environmental systems. Specific examples of air-water-soil interactions and consequent effects. Heterogeneous equilibria with more than one solid phase. Kinetics and thermodynamics of some important ionic and biological reactions. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: CEE 274

CEE 475 Advanced Topics in Environmental Engineering 1-3 Credit

Advanced concentrated study of a selected topic in environmental engineering such as non-point source pollution control, water reuse systems, new concepts in treatment technology, toxic substance control, etc. The instructor and student select topic. Courses may include specialized laboratory research, literature review, and specialty conference attendance. Consent of department chair required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 476 Environmental Biotechnology 3 Credits

Fundamentals of microbiology and biochemistry applied to natural and engineered environmental systems. Systems ecology, energetics and kinetics of microbial growth, nutrition and toxicology, use of microorganisms for pollution monitoring and control. Pathogenicity and disease transmission, water quality using biological indices. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 375 or CHE 375

CEE 477 Environmental Engineering Processes 3 Credits

Processed applied in environmental engineering for air pollution control, treatment of drinking water, municipal wastewater, industrial wastes and environmental remediation. Kinetics, reactor theory, mass balances, application of fundamental physical, chemical and biological principles to analysis and design. Prerequisites as noted below or consent of instructor.
Prerequisites: CEE 170

CEE 478 Toxic and Hazardous Wastes 3 Credits

Regulations for collection, transportation, disposal and storage of hazardous wastes. Containment systems, monitoring, types of liners, new and available technologies to eliminate or recover the hazardous components of the wastes. Prerequisites as noted below.
Prerequisites: (CEE 274 or CEE 375 or CHE 375)

CEE 479 Environmental Engineering Research 1-6 Credit

Individual research problems in environmental engineering with report.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 480 Civil Engineering Project 1-6 Credit

An intensive study of one or more areas of civil engineering, with emphasis on engineering design and applications. A written report is required.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 481 Special Problems 1-6 Credit

An intensive study, with report, of a special field of civil engineering, which is not covered in the other courses. A design project or an interdisciplinary study of a problem related to civil engineering may also be included.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

CEE 483 Graduate Seminar 1-3 Credit

Study of current topics in civil engineering.

CEE 491 Thesis 1-6 Credit

CEE 499 Dissertation 1-15 Credit

Professors. Panayiotis Diplas, PhD (University of Minnesota Duluth); Dan M. Frangopol, SCD (Universite de Liege); Gerard P. Lennon, PhD (Cornell University); Sibel Pamukcu, PhD (Louisian State University); Stephen P. Pessiki, PhD (Cornell University); James M. Ricles, PhD (University of California Berkeley); Richard Sause, Jr., PhD (University of California Berkeley); Arup K. Sengupta, PhD (University of Houston University Park); Richard N. Weisman, PhD (Cornell University); John L. Wilson, PhD (University of Pittsburgh)

Associate Professors. Derick G. Brown, PhD (Princeton University); Kristen Jellison, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); Peter Mueller, DSC (ETH Zurich); Clay Joshua Naito, PhD (University of California Berkeley)

Assistant Professors. Paolo Bocchini, PhD (University of Bologna); John Thomas Fox, PhD (The Pennsylvania State University); Shamim N. Pakzad, PhD (University of California Berkeley); Spencer E. Quiel, PhD (Princeton University); Muhannad T. Suleiman, PhD (Iowa State University); Tara Jeanne Troy, PhD (Princeton University)

Professors Of Practice. Jennifer H. Gross, MS (University Texas Austin); Mesut Pervizpour, PhD (Lehigh University)

Emeriti. John Hartley Daniels, PhD (Lehigh University); Hsai-Yang Fang, PhD (West Virginia Univ); John W. Fisher, PhD (Lehigh University); Ti Huang, PhD (University of Michigan Ann Arbor); Le-Wu Lu, PhD (Lehigh University); Alexis Ostapenko, SCD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); Robert M. Sorensen, PhD (University of California Berkeley); David A. Van Horn, PhD (Iowa State University); Ben T. Yen, PhD (Lehigh University)