2017-18 Catalog

Classical Studies

Program Director: Barbara Pavlock, Ph. D. (Cornell)

Email: bp01@lehigh.edu  ♦  Phone: 610-758-3309

Website: http://classics.cas2.lehigh.edu/

Supported by the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs, 610-758-3996; incasip@lehigh.edu
Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive


Core Faculty

Barbara Pavlock, Ph.D. (Department of English); David Small, Ph.D. (Department of Sociology and Anthropology)


The study of Classics examines first the origins and growth of Greek and Roman culture in the Mediterranean area and second its impact on that area (and others) until the present. This study is by nature interdisciplinary: the study of language and literature, history, philosophy and religion, archaeology, economics and science all contribute to an appreciation of Greco-Roman civilization.

Students in either major or minor programs may concentrate in various combinations of these and other disciplines as they relate to ancient civilization. The diversity of the program should encourage the student to follow her or his special interests while simultaneously gaining an overview of classical civilization.

Courses in ancient Greek and Latin lead to proficiency in language while introducing the student to major literary texts. The Joseph A. Maurer Classics Prize is awarded yearly, at the discretion of the program, to the senior(s) who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in Classics (ancient Greek or Latin) and/or classical civilization. Courses in classical civilization require no knowledge of the ancient languages; they offer introductions to various disciplines of Classics with frequent reference to modern perspectives. Upper-level courses tend to be small, fostering closeness between faculty and students.

Petitions are required for freshmen to take 100-level or higher courses and for sophomores to take 200-level or higher courses.

Major Programs

Students may major either in Classical Civilization or in Classics. The Classics major offers a comprehensive view of language and culture; it is possible to begin an ancient language at Lehigh and to complete the major program successfully. The Classical Civilization major enables the student to gain a broad perspective on Greek and Roman civilization. The program welcomes double majors and the educational perspectives to be derived from combining ancient and modern studies.

Classics as a major has stood the test of time, offering helpful preparation for careers in widely diverse fields in the professions, business, and public service. Lehigh Classics majors have gone on to law school, to the ministry, to business school, with appropriate science courses to medical school, to graduate work in Classics, and to all kinds of entry-level employment.

Departmental Honors

A student may be recommended for program honors by vote of the program based on the student’s course work.

Study Abroad

Lehigh University is a cooperating institution of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies at Rome. Lehigh students are eligible for tuition grants in Athens and Rome.

Major in Classical Civilization

This major allows the student to gain an overview of Greco-Roman culture through the literature, archaeology, and history along with basic language study. A minimum of 36 credits is expected, but adjustments may be made for prior language study. Students need to consult the Program Director to determine appropriate adjustments to the guidelines for major requirements.

Select four of the following:16
Classical Epic
Greek Tragedy
Topics in Greek and Roman Literature
Greek and Roman Comedy
Greek Archaeology
Roman Archaeology
Any two courses in ancient history8
At least one elective from the remaining program offerings (ANTH 178 may be included)4
Two semesters of elementary Latin or Greek8
Total Credits36

Major in Classics

This major allows the student to concentrate in ancient Greek, Latin or both. Specific programs for this major are worked out for each student with due consideration for the individual’s particular previous study of the language(s). Thus a student may begin ancient Greek or Latin at Lehigh and successfully complete a major in it. A minimum of 36 credits is expected, but adjustments may be made for prior language study. Students need to consult the Program Director to determine appropriate adjustments to the guidelines for major requirements.

Required Major Courses
Select one of the following: 18
Elementary Latin I
and Elementary Latin II
Elementary Ancient Greek I
and Elementary Ancient Greek II
Select one of the following: 18
Intermediate Latin
and Intermediate Latin
Intermediate Ancient Greek
and Intermediate Ancient Greek
Three advanced courses in the major language minimum. 212
Any two ancient history courses.8
At least one elective from the remaining program offerings.4
Total Credits40
1

Depending on prior preparation.

2

Depending on prior preparation and on the extent of coursework in the second Classical language.  Students entering with significant previous language study in their major language (Latin or Greek) will be expected to take four or more advanced courses. The specific number of credits for language study will be determined in consultation with the Program Director.

Minor Programs

The program has three minors: Classics, Latin, and Classical Civilization. The minor in Classics combines language study and civilization courses (with a minimum of two courses in the languages). The minor in Latin focuses exclusively on the study of Latin. For the minor in Classical Civilization, students may take any combination of courses in Classical Civilization (any courses designated CLSS). All the minors require a minimum of 16 credits. The program can arrange individual courses of study.  Classical Studies Minor Declaration Form.

Classics Minor 16 credits
Latin Minor 16 credits
Classical Civilizations Minor 16 credits

Classics Courses

CLSS 021 (HIST 021) Greek History 4 Credits

The development of civilization from palaeolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great. The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 022 (HIST 022) Roman History 4 Credits

Rome from its origins to A.D. 476. Political, social and religious developments. Transformation of the late Roman Empire to the early medieval period.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 050 (ENGL 050) Classical Mythology 4 Credits

Introduction to the study of the Greco-Roman myths in their social, political, and historical contexts. Emphasis on myths and their analysis as important evidence for studying classical antiquity.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 052 (ENGL 052) Classical Epic 4 Credits

Study of major epic poems from Greece and Rome. Works include Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Apollonius’ Argonautica, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 054 (ENGL 054, THTR 054) Greek Tragedy 4 Credits

Aspects of Greek theater and plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in their social and intellectual contexts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 056 (ENGL 056) Topics in Greek and Roman Literature 4 Credits

Classical literature in translation, including themes or specific periods in Greek or Roman literature.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 058 (ENGL 058, THTR 058) Greek and Roman Comedy 4 Credits

Study of comedy as a social form through plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 091 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

CLSS 112 (ANTH 112) Doing Archaeology 4 Credits

Principles of archaeological method and theory. Excavation and survey methods, artifact analysis, dating techniques, and cultural reconstruction. Course includes field project.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 114 (JST 114, REL 114) Christian Origins: New Testament and the Beginnings of Christianity 4 Credits

Early Christianity from its beginnings until the end of the second century. Coverage includes the Jewish and Hellenistic matrices of Christianity, traditions about the life of Jesus and his significance, and the variety of belief and practice of early Christians. Emphasis on encountering primary texts.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 131 (PHIL 131) Ancient Philosophy 4 Credits

Historical survey of selected texts and issues in the classical world, from the pre-Socratics through Aristotle, with emphasis on the origins of the western philosophical traditions in ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 132 (PHIL 132) Hellenistic Philosophy 4 Credits

Historical survey of selected texts and issues in Post-Aristotelian Greek and Roman philosophy from the fourth century B.C. to the third century A.D. Areas of focus may include epicureanism, stoicism, academic and pyrrhonian scepticism, and neoplatonism.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 161 (HIST 161) Roman Law 4 Credits

Examination of Roman legal systems from the Twelve Tables to the Digest of Justinian. Emphasis on development of legal concepts and their historical context. Readings in primary sources; lectures; discussion.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 171 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

CLSS 174 (ANTH 174, ARCH 174, ART 174) Greek Archaeology 4 Credits

Ancient Greek culture from the neolithic to Hellenistic periods. Reconstructions of Greek social dynamics from the study of artifacts.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 176 (ANTH 176, ARCH 176, ART 176) Roman Archaeology 4 Credits

Cultures of the Roman Empire. Reconstructions of social, political, and economic dynamics of the imperial system from the study of artifacts.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 191 Special Topics 1-4 Credits

CLSS 213 (HIST 213, REL 213) Ancient Roman Religion 4 Credits

Religious experience of the Roman people from prehistory to end of the empire. Nature of polytheism and its interactions with monotheism (Christianity, Judaism). Theories of religion. Emphasis on primary source materials.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 231 (PHIL 231) Figures and Themes in Ancient Philosophy 4 Credits

This seminar course will involve in-depth focus upon a major ancient thinker (e.g. Plato, Aristotle, Sextus Empiricus, Plotinus, etc.) or the classical treatment of a particular theme (e.g.,“human nature,” “the good life,” ethical or political theory, etc.). Content varies. May be repeated for credit if content differs from previous. Must have completed one HU designated course in Philosophy.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: PHIL 105 or PHIL 116 or PHIL 117 or PHIL 120 or PHIL 121 or PHIL 122 or PHIL 123 or PHIL 124 or PHIL 125 or PHIL 127 or PHIL 128 or PHIL 129 or PHIL 131 or PHIL 132 or PHIL 133 or PHIL 135 or PHIL 137 or PHIL 139 or PHIL 140 or PHIL 141 or PHIL 142 or PHIL 145 or PHIL 146 or PHIL 150
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 232 (PHIL 232) Figures/Themes in Hellenistic Philosophy 4 Credits

This seminar course will involve an in-depth focus upon a major movement in Hellenistic Philosophy (roughly 4th century B.C.E. to the 2nd Century C.E.) such as Epicureanism, Stoicism, Ancient Scepticism, or Neoplatonism, or the Hellenistic treatment of a particular theme (e.g. freedom from anxiety, the nature of the Cosmos and our place within it, or human nature). Content varies. Must have completed one HU-designated course in Philosophy at 100-level or higher.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

CLSS 251 (REL 251) Classical Mythology 4 Credits

Myth, religion, and ritual in ancient Greece and Rome. Emphasis on primary sources; introduction to ancient and modern theories of religion. Cross-cultural material.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 281 Readings 4 Credits

Advanced study of a historical period or theme. Emphasis on primary sources. Consent of program head required.
Prerequisites: CLSS 021 or CLSS 022
Attribute/Distribution: ND

CLSS 282 Readings 4 Credits

Advanced study of a historical period or theme. Emphasis on primary sources. Consent of program head required.
Prerequisites: CLSS 021 or CLSS 022
Attribute/Distribution: ND

CLSS 291 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

CLSS 300 Apprentice Teaching 3 Credits

CLSS 311 (HIST 311) Twins and Sins: The Rise of Rome 4 Credits

Rome from its origins to the mid-third century B.C. Emphasis on foundation legends, the power of the monarchy, and development of Roman political and religious institutions. Papers, quizzes, discussions.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 312 (HIST 312) Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire 4 Credits

Political, social, and economic history of the Roman Empire, A.D. 117-A.D. 565. Romanization of the provinces, diffusion of Christianity, and special attention to transformation to medieval period. Includes readings in translation of primary sources.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 314 (HIST 314) Age of Caesar and Christ 4 Credits

Roman history of the first century A.D. Political, cultural, and socio-economic changes; special attention to the evolution of absolute power. Lectures, discussions, papers.
Attribute/Distribution: SS

CLSS 389 Honors Project 1-8 Credits

Greek Courses

GRK 001 Elementary Ancient Greek I 4 Credits

Fundamentals of the Greek language. Grammatical exercises and short passages of easy prose.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 002 Elementary Ancient Greek II 4 Credits

Continued work in Greek vocabulary, forms, and syntax. Selected readings in Greek. Students should have completed one semester of elementary ancient Greek or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GRK 001
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 011 Intermediate Ancient Greek 4 Credits

Readings in Herodotus, Homer, or Xenophon. Grammar review. Students should have completed two semesters of elementary ancient Greek or the equivalent.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 012 Intermediate Ancient Greek 4 Credits

May include Plato: Euthyphro, Apology and Crito, or other dialogues. Students should have completed two semesters of elementary Greek or the equivalent.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 091 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 111 Greek Drama 4 Credits

Representative plays of Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. Literary study of the drama. Students should have completed four semesters of ancient Greek or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: GRK 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 112 Readings in Ancient Greek 4 Credits

Readings of Greek prose and poetry, authors will vary. Students should have completed four semesters of ancient Greek or the equivalent.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: GRK 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 113 Greek Historians 4 Credits

Selections from Herodotus, Thucydides or Xenophon. Study of Greek historiography. Students should have completed four semesters of ancient Greek or the equivalent.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 171 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 271 Readings 4 Credits

Intensive readings in one author or in a selected genre. Must have completed eight hours of courses at the 100 level and consent of the program head.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 272 Readings 4 Credits

Intensive readings in one author or in a selected genre. Must have completed eight hours of courses at the 100 level. Consent of the program head required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

GRK 291 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

Latin Courses

LAT 001 Elementary Latin I 4 Credits

Fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Emphasis on language structure and vocabulary building.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 002 Elementary Latin II 4 Credits

Continuation of grammar, easy Latin prose and poetry. Students should have completed one semester of elementary Latin or the equivalent.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 011 Intermediate Latin 4 Credits

Readings in Latin prose or poetry. Consolidation of reading ability; introduction to literary analysis. Students should have completed two semesters of elementary Latin or the equivalent.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 012 Intermediate Latin 4 Credits

Readings in Latin prose or poetry. Consolidation of reading ability; introduction to literary analysis. Students should have completed two semesters of elementary Latin or the equivalent.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 091 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

LAT 111 Catullus and Horace 4 Credits

Translation and analysis of selected lyrics, focusing on imagery systems. Introduction to metrics. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: LAT 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 112 Latin Prose 4 Credits

Readings from Latin prose literature of the late republic and early empire; selections may include Cicero’s letters, Sallust, Pliny’s letters. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: LAT 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 113 Vergil 4 Credits

Selections from the Aeneid. Vergil’s creation of a Latin epic and its complex perspective. Metrics. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: LAT 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 114 Livy 4 Credits

Selections from the early books of Livy’s histories focusing on his creation of a Roman mythos. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LAT 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 115 Ovid 4 Credits

May include selections from the Ars Amatoria, Fasti, and the Metamorphoses, with attention to the problem of the ideology of Augustan Rome. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites: LAT 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 116 Petronius 4 Credits

Selections from the Satyricon, focusing on language usage and epic parody. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: LAT 012
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 171 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 211 Readings 4 Credits

Intensive readings in one author or in a selected genre. Must have completed eight hours of courses at the 100 level. Consent of the program head required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 212 Readings 4 Credits

Intensive reading in one author or in a selected genre. Must have completed eight hours of courses at the 100 level. Consent of the program head required.
Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 291 Independent Study 1-4 Credits

Attribute/Distribution: HU

LAT 300 Apprentice Teaching 3 Credits